Laura Candler

Web Producer

Laura moved from Chattanooga to Chapel Hill in 2013 to join WUNC as a web producer. She graduated from the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in the spring of 2012 and has created radio and multimedia stories for a variety of outlets, including Marketplace, Prairie Public, and Maine Public Broadcasting. When she's not out hunting stories, you can usually find her playing the fiddle.  

Ways to Connect

Exoneree Charles Chatman spent 27 years in prison an innocent person.
David Persoff

One of the longest prison sentences ever served by an innocent person was done by Charles Chatman of Dallas County Texas. Chatman, a black man, was wrongfully convicted of raping a white woman in 1981 and sentenced to 99 years in prison. He served nearly 27 years before he was exonerated in 2008. Although he went before the parole board multiple times during his sentence, he was never granted parole because he never admitted guilt.

Hartman Center, Rubenstein Library, Duke University

The title of last night’s show,"Favors," accurately sums up a major theme seen in the episode.  Many characters need or give favors, though not without consequences.  The SC&P staff realizes that they are competing for two similar clients, Sunkist and Ocean Spray, so one will have to be resigned. While talking to Peggy, Pete’s mother claims she is in love with her nurse Manolo, and implies that their relationship is sexual. Sylvia and Arnold are afraid because their son Mitchell is reclassified 1A by the draft after dropping out of school and sending back his draft card in protest.

Exoneree Damon Thibodeaux
David Persoff

Damon Thibodeaux has a lot to be angry about. In 1997, when he was 22 years old, he was wrongfully convicted of murder and spent the next 15 years on death row, terrified of dying for a crime he did not commit. But he’s trying not to dwell on that.  At 38 years old, he’s focusing on the years he has in front of him.

Exoneree John Thompson
David Persoff

John Thompson was a 22-year-old father of two when the New Orleans police broke down his door to arrest him. What happened next was like a nightmare. He was taken to the homicide division, where he listened to a cassette tape of a man he knew accuse him of murder. The acquaintance had sold him a gun recently, which turned out to be the murder weapon. Then, other people around the neighborhood started coming forward with additional, unrelated crime reports and pinned them on Thompson. A neighbor said that he looked like the man who robbed his children. He became a suspect for an unsolved armed robbery that had occurred weeks earlier.

Ballad singer and banj player Sheila Kay Adams.
Kim Dryden, courtesty of Sheila Kay Adams

Mention the name Sheila Kay Adams to any traditional old time musician and you’re likely to elicit a reverent response.  In the world of American ballad singers, Adams remains one of the pillars of tradition, drawing on her Madison County roots to perform and teach the old style of singing and banjo playing passed down in her family for generations.  This week, her lifetime of nurturing and sharing traditional music earned her a National Heritage Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Eric Staal in the Carolina Hurricanes' new uniform, NHL
Carolina Hurricanes

The Carolina Hurricanes have spent 15 years in the same uniform, but next season that all changes. Today the PNC arena, the team unveiled a new design for its home and road dress. While the signature red and white colors and the identifying logo remain the same, the style is cleaner and more modern.

Hartman Center, Rubenstein Library, Duke University

The riots and politics of the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago continually weave in and out of Episode 10, through media and discussions. The partners begin discussing changing the agency's name.  Don, Roger and Harry travel to Los Angeles for client presentations, including Carnation. Harry drives Don and Roger to a party in the Hollywood Hills.  Starlets and stoned hippies roam poolside. Don is invited to share a hit from a hookah. His hallucination ends with him seeing himself face down in the swimming pool. He comes to on the deck, wet and coughing, with a soaked and out-of-breath Roger telling everyone he's fine.

Promotional poster for Homeland TV series' first season.
Homeland

The critically-acclaimed TV series “Homeland” heads to Downtown Raleigh June 3-4 to film scenes for season three. The Showtime series normally shoots in and around Charlotte. Earlier this week, the show filmed a scene in The Charlotte Observer newsroom. (The News & Observer created a slideshow of the newsroom filming.)

Mad Men Tuesday: Episode 9 With Duke's Hartman Center

May 28, 2013
Hartman Center, Rubenstein Library, Duke University

This is a weekly column written by the Hartman Center, part of Duke University's Rubenstein Library that studies advertising history. Each Monday they dig through their archive to find ads for items referenced in the latest Mad Men episode. Here is this week's column (originally posted on their blog) written by Jacqueline Reid Wachholz and the Hartman Center.

Anna Roberts-Gevalt and Elizabeth LaPrelle singing the ballad 'Lord Bateman' with a 'crankie.'
Laura Candler

When traditional Appalachian musician Anna Roberts-Gevalt first showed ballad singer Elizabeth LaPrelle a crankie, Elizabeth was speechless.

“I really freaked out,” LaPrelle said. She was astounded not only because she had never seen one before, but also because it was such a powerful tool for storytelling.

Hartman Center, Rubenstein Library, Duke University

This is a weekly column written by the Hartman Center, part of Duke University's Rubenstein Library that studies advertising history. Each Monday they dig through their archive to find ads for items referenced in the latest Mad Men episode. Here is this week's column (originally posted on their blog) written by Lynn Eaton and the Hartman Center.

A child playing a street piano in New York.
Ed Yourdon via Flickr, Creative Commons

All the world’s a stage. Or, at least Downtown Raleigh will be for the next two weeks, as six pianos have been placed there outdoors for anyone to play.  The decorated instruments are set up in public locations around the city as a part of Artsplosure, Raleigh’s annual visual and performing arts festival, and passersby of any skill level are encouraged to give them a go.

Repository: Hartman Center, Rubenstein Library, Duke University

This is a weekly column written by the Hartman Center, part of Duke University's Rubenstein Library that studies advertising history. Each Monday they dig through their archive to find ads for items referenced in the latest Mad Men episode. Here is this week's column (originally posted on their blog) written by Jacqueline Wachholz and the Hartman Center.

Museum of the Albemarle and Gary Cooper

People often turn to history books to learn about bygone eras, but a new exhibit at the Museum of the Albemarle showcases the value of postcards important cultural documents.  The exhibit contains old and new postcards that depict a variety of coastal North Carolina scenes: people on beaches, coastal transportation, architecture, and more. Some of the cards have even been altered to be viewed in 3-D. (Glasses are provided.)

Stephen Colbert
David Shankbone

On his popular Comedy Central talk show The Colbert Report Wednesday night, Stephen Colbert mourned the fact that his sister, Elizabeth Colbert-Busch, lost to former South Carolina governor Mark Sanford in a race for the state’s first district’s Congressional seat.

“Mark Sanford beat my sister,” Colbert said. “I feel so betrayed by South Carolina.”

A rescue swimmer from Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City trains with rescue basket from a MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter.
US Coast Guard

A British man in a sailboat 70 miles off of Kitty Hawk was rescued by a Coast Guard helicopter this morning.

Trevor Wilson, 72, requested a medevac from his 24-foot sailboat named Erma at approximately 6 a.m. He told the Coast Guard that had fallen and hit his head and been unconscious for seven hours.

A Coquerel's Sifaka lemur at the Duke Lemur Center.
Laura Candler

A Walking with Lemurs tour at the Duke Lemur Center might just seem like an ordinary walk through the woods at first. But at the rustle of a food bucket, tiny, energetic animals begin to descend from the treetops, and you know you’re not walking in any normal forest. Lemurs zip past you at will, some of them with tiny infants clinging to their backs, and there are no barriers between you and the furry primates.

James Beard Foundation
James Beard Foundation

The James Beard Foundation announced the recipients of the 2013 Restaurant and Chef Awards on Monday night. Raleigh’s Ashley Christensen of Poole’s Diner was in the running for Best Chef in the Southeast, but the final award for that category went to Joseph Lenn of The Barn at Blackberry Farm in Walland, Tennessee. Christensen was North Carolina’s only James Beard Award Nominee (finalist) this year, out of 13 semi-finalists in the state. Hear her interview with WUNC's State of Things.

Mad Men Mondays: The Hartman Center Tackles Episode 6

May 6, 2013
Mad Men Mondays
John W. Hartman Center, Duke University Rubenstein Library

Starting today, WUNC will begin publishing the latest "Mad Men Monday" column written by the Hartman Center. A part of Duke University's Rubenstein Library, the Hartman Center studies advertising history, and each Monday they dig through their archive to find ads for items referenced in the latest Mad Men episode. Here is this week's column, written by Jacqueline Wachholz and the Hartman Center (originally posted here):

courtesy of Hartman Center, Rubenstein Library, Duke University.

AMC’s new Mad Men season debuted in April and has a lot of people talking. Locally, it’s creating a buzz at the Hartman Center, part of Duke's Rubenstein Library which specializes in advertising and marketing history. The center is an international resource for all things ad-related, and their archives are full of the sort of ads seen on Mad Men.

A performer at last year's Oak City 7 concert series in Raleigh.
Carter Peery, courtesy of OC7.

Summer is fast approaching, and so is outdoor concert season. If you’re aching to spend warm nights in the company of friends listening to good music under the stars, you’re in luck. The options for outdoor music in the Triad are numerous. Several small towns host regular, free concerts and larger cities like Raleigh, Durham, and Greensboro have multiple outdoor music series showcasing  everything from chamber music to R & B, and from hip hop to bluegrass.

The extremist literature collection is being prepared for scholarly use by the Rubenstein Library staff.
Duke University

The Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Project has donated its collection of extremist literature – pamphlets and flyers issued by the KKK, neo-nazis, racist skinheads, border vigilantes, and neo-Confederates – to Duke’s David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library. The nearly 90-box collection will be housed there to allow scholarly research on the histories of extremist groups in the U.S.

A scene from a Lost Colony performance.
The Lost Colony

The North Carolina outdoor drama The Lost Colony has been tapped for a 2013 Tony Honors for Excellence in the Theatre.  With 75 seasons under its belt, the yearly production on Roanoke Island began in the summer of 1937 and has continued almost every year since. It is the longest-running symphonic drama in the country. This video shows clips from the play:

Dogs wait in line for treats from the Waggin' Wagon.
courtesy of McKinney

The Triangle has some of the state’s most sought-after flavors: a recent slew of James-Beard Award semifinalists and Durham’s newest title, “Tastiest Town in the South,” have people chatting happily about the region’s good tastes.

Leaves on trees in a forest.
Laura Candler

A new study from researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has revealed exactly how trees play a role in smog production. The question has been a source of scientific uncertainty for years, and the findings are a milestone in air pollution research, with potentially significant implications for public health.

European Champion, Eric Terrien from France
Ben Thouard BIC SPORTS

Stand up paddleboarding (SUP) involves a surfboard, a paddle, and lots of abdominal strength. And in the world of sports, it’s catching on fast. That might not be too surprising, since it often involves bathing suits and sunny beaches, too.  Starting today, SUP athletes from around the world will compete in the third annual Carolina Cup at Wrightsville Beach.

A sample mug from Will McCanless of McCanless Pottery
Will McCanless / McCanless Pottery

Seagrove, North Carolina, located just a few miles south of the North Carolina Zoo in Randolph County, calls itself the handmade pottery capital of the United States. It is home to dozens of potters, and the tradition of pottery-making there dates back to the late 1700’s. English and German immigrants are said to have settled the area and quickly realized the value of its strong, red clay for making pots and dishes. Since then, the tradition has grown, and now the area is now a mecca for pottery and pottery-related history.

Events held there include the Seagrove Pottery Festival and the Celebration of Seagrove Potters, and the town is also home to the North Carolina Pottery Center and the Museum of Traditional NC Pottery. The Seagrove pottery directory lists dozens and dozens of potters in the area.

Six of the area potters (represented by four potteries)  are providing mugs to WUNC listeners as part of the Spring 2013 Fund Drive.  For a pledge of $120, or $10/month as a sustainer, you can choose to have WUNC send you a one-of-a-kind handmade mug created and fired in North Carolina from a Seagrove potter.

David Holt took this photo of Doc Watson's final Merlefest performance in 2012. Watson died a month later.
David Holt

If you’re searching for the who’s who among bluegrass, Americana, folk, and traditional country musicians, MerleFest is a good place to start. The annual four-day festival kicks off today in Wilkesboro, just as it has every April for the past 25 years. Headlining artists include The Avett Brothers, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Rhonda Vincent & The Rage, Jerry Douglas, Steep Canyon Rangers, Matraca Berg, and others. But this year for the first time, the festival will lack a performance from its founder, Doc Watson, who died May 29, 2012.

Sutton's Drug Store in downtown Chapel Hill.
courtesy of Sutton's Drug Store

Ask any long-time Chapel Hill resident to name a few of the town’s business icons, and Sutton’s Drug Store is likely to come up. Founded in 1923, the old fashioned pharmacy has been open for 90 years and celebrates that fact today with a special deal for its customers: from 11:00 to 4:30, hot dogs, Cokes and French fries will be only a nickel, reflecting the store’s 1923 prices. They’re expecting several hundreds of customers.

Walking a dog on Bolin Creek Trail.
Catherine Lazorko, Town of Chapel Hill

Orange County’s population may be smaller than that of its neighboring counties, but its greenways are no less loved. Chapel Hill and Carrboro both tout themselves as bike and pedestrian friendly towns, and Hillsborough has taken pains to create elaborate bicycle and walking routes throughout its downtown area that highlight dozens of historical buildings.  

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