Jessica Diaz-Hurtado

Jessica Diaz Hurtado is a Kroc Fellow at NPR. With roots in Latin America, her work focuses on immigration, race, conflict and culture. She received her B.A. in Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and was awarded the First Wave Hip Hop and Urban Arts Scholarship. She also received her M.A. in Latin American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin as a Ronald E. McNair Scholar. In 2014 she directed and produced her award-winning documentary series, Ta Ligado: Rodas e Hip Hop no Rio, on Rio de Janeiro's youth hip hop culture. After graduating, she was a freelance multimedia journalist in South America. She is currently a 2016-17 Kroc Fellow.

In an attempt to reach a younger and more diverse audience, the largest and most well-known Latino advocacy group in the U.S., the National Council of La Raza, renamed itself this month. The new name, UnidosUS, was announced at the group's 2017 conference in Phoenix. This has caused a rift in the U.S. Latino community — some see it as shedding a dated name, but others see it as leaving a legacy behind.

Whenever Esteban Castillo visited his grandparents in Colima, Mexico, he'd sit by his grandfather's taco stand and watch him cook. He'd also see his grandmother carry her homemade cheeses on her back and go door to door, selling them in different neighborhoods. To this day, his grandparents still make a living off of food.

"They basically transform their living room into a restaurant during the weekends to make ends meet," says Castillo.

It has been a long battle for the Henriquez family to finally sit in the same D.C. courtroom as the man who allegedly ordered the murder of their father and husband.

Hernan Giraldo Serna, a Colombian ex-paramilitary leader, was sentenced Friday to more than 16 years in prison for conspiring to import cocaine into the United States.

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