Jeremy Loeb

Reporter

Ways to Connect

NC Clean Energy Data Book
energync.org

People interested in North Carolina's clean energy economy will now find much of what they're looking for in one source. The non-profit North Carolina Sustainable Energy Association has released a book that compiles various data, maps, and charts on North Carolina's green infrastructure.
Spokeswoman Julie Robinson says there isn't just one dominant source of clean energy.

A commonly used image of Lowry.
www.ncmuseumofhistory.org

Henry Berry Lowry was a Lumbee Indian sometimes described as the “Robin Hood” of Robeson County, North Carolina. But Lowry’s story is much more nuanced than that. He’s a hero to some, a murderer to others. All told, Lowry and his gang of outlaws were responsible for some two dozen killings as the Civil War ended and during Reconstruction.

RBC bank
RBC

PNC Financial has announced that it will buy Raleigh-based RBC Bank in a move that will allow the Pittsburgh-based bank to expand into the South. The deal is worth nearly $3.5 billion. Jim Westlake is the CEO of RBC Bank in Raleigh. He says he doesn't know yet what the local impact will be.

Moonshine

Jun 14, 2011

Charlie Thompson wanted to learn more about his grandfather’s history in moonshine, so began investigating his hometown and the “Moonshine Capital of the World,” Franklin County, Virginia. What he found was a complicated picture of poverty and necessity juxtaposed with a hierarchy of power that was revealed during a famous conspiracy trial in 1935.

Tom Maxwell

Jun 10, 2011
tommaxwell.com

Tom Maxwell is best known for his time spent with the Chapel Hill ‘90s group the Squirrel Nut Zippers, but a lot has happened since then. His then 3-year-old son Esten was diagnosed with Leukemia and has completed treatment.  Maxwell is writing a memoir about that experience and about his time with the Squirrel Nut Zippers. He's started a Kickstarter project to help pay for that project.  And now he’s releasing his second solo record, “Kingdom Come.” The CD release party is at Motorco in Durham tonight at 8 p.m.

Restorative justice is a theory of justice that emphasizes healing rather than punishing. The idea is to repair the harm for everyone involved: the victims, the offenders, and the community. The Campbell University School of Law in Raleigh plays host to the third annual National Conference on Restorative Justice June 8-10 at the Sheraton Hotel in Raleigh. Host Frank Stasio talks about restorative justice with Therese Bartholomew, producer and director of “The Final Gift,” a film about her brother’s murder and her attempt to reconcile with his killer; Howard Zehr, professor of restorative justice at Eastern Mennonite University, and Amy Elliott, co-founder of the Restorative Justice Project in Durham.

A statewide advocacy group is launching a new program to raise awareness of pool safety. The campaign by "Safe Kids North Carolina" aims to improve safety at pools and encourage simple steps that can save lives. Director Kelly Ransdell says about 400 kids under the age of 14 drown in pools and spas each year in the United States.

The recession has highlighted the need for a more educated workforce. That's according to "The State of the North Carolina Workforce 2011-2020" report. Kenneth Poole is CEO and President of the Center for Regional Economic Competitiveness.

A Lowe's home improvement store in Sanford all but leveled by the April 16th tornados will be rebuilt. Construction will begin May 25th at the same site where Lowe's employees rushed customers to safety as the tornados approached. Bob Bridwell is the Director of Planning and Development for Sanford and Lee County.

Bob Bridwell: "Lowes is the symbol of our storm damage here in Lee County. It's also the symbol of our recovery. So seeing this come back to life for the rest of the town I think is extremely important."

A former Alcoa smelting plant in Stanly County will now be home to an electronics recycling center. 

Solar energy industry leaders are gathered in Raleigh for a 5 day national conference. It's the 40th year for the National Solar Conference held by the American Solar Energy Society. This year it's being held at the Raleigh Convention Center. The public is invited to the final day of the conference this Saturday.

Town commissioners in Hope Mills have a plan for repairing the broken Hope Mills Dam. The dam failed last June leaving the Hope Mills Lake dry. The town's attorney presented the plan during a commissioner's meeting this week. It calls for repairing the existing dam rather than building a new one. The companies that built the dam will repair it at their expense. Mayor Eddie Dees says he's happy to have the plan.

Durham health officials want to ban smoking in a number of public places, including all county and city grounds, athletic fields, playgrounds, and bus stops. Gayle Harris is director of the Durham County Health Department.

Huge crowd of fans turn out to see Scotty McCreery on Saturday
Jeremy Loeb

 

  This week, Garner native Scotty McCreery will perform in the final three of the American Idol tv show. The newly-minted 17 year old star was welcomed home over the weekend with a made-for-tv celebration. 

Scotty McCreery
americanidol.com

  The Town of Garner is getting ready to welcome home "American Idol" finalist Scotty McCreery. Jeremy Loeb reports.

 The 17-year-old baritone advanced to the "Final 3" of the television show "American Idol" last night. McCreery has been wowing audiences with his mature, deep-voiced renditions of country classics. Mayor Ronnie Williams called the singer's success the biggest thing that's ever happened to Garner.

A proposal from WakeMed to buy Rex Healthcare from UNC is getting a chilly response. UNC president Thomas Ross said in a statement selling Rex Healthcare would be damaging to its core mission and not in the best interest of the people of North Carolina. He went on to say UNC Health Care's board of directors will discuss the proposal on Monday. WakeMed President and CEO Bill Atkinson says there are number of uncertainties over health care in Wake County.

Triangle residents will soon have to dial 10 digits to make local phone calls. That's because almost all numbers with the 919 area code are used up. Switzon Wigfall is a Senior Operations Analyst with the North Carolina Utilities Commission. He says this is a result of the explosion of cell phone use.

Switzon Wigfall: "When you have school kids 7 and 8 years old with cell phones, you can see the multiplicity effect of all the applications that's taken place in telecommunication markets today. So, yes. As some point, you exhaust the numbers."

Firefighters continue to fight a large blaze burning in northeastern North Carolina. Officials reported progress Monday in protecting homes and business from the fire. It started last Thursday in the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. Spokesman Bill Sweet says favorable weather conditions allowed firefighters to burn land in the path of the fire to keep it from spreading further.

There's new evidence that the method of extracting natural gas called "hydraulic fracturing" could be contaminating drinking water. A team of Duke researchers have found elevated levels of methane in well water near hydraulic fracturing sites. That could be an important finding as state legislators consider whether to begin allowing the practice here in North Carolina. Natural gas deposits have been discovered deep under some of the state's most populated counties like Wake, Durham, and Orange.

Marines at Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville have a new facility to train for their biggest threat in Afghanistan: roadside bombs.

Improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, are responsible for nearly 80 percent of combat deaths in Afghanistan. The Marine Corps says Camp Lejeune's new training facility will ensure Marines are as prepared as possible before going into harm's way.

Jamani the gorilla from the NC Zoo
NC Zoo

  A gorilla at the North Carolina Zoo in Asheboro is expecting. That's big news for the zoo which has only had one other gorilla birth in its history. Spokesman Rod Hackney has been at the zoo for 24 years and still remembers the last birth. It was 22 years ago in 1989.

A dam breach in Moore County didn't put the public in danger. But it did serve as a reminder of the many dams in North Carolina that could be more dangerous if they failed. Mell Nevils, Chief of the Land Quality Section of the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, which includes the North Carolina Dam Safety Program, says the dam in Moore County was classified as an "intermediate hazard" meaning there was a likelihood of property damage in the event of a failure.

Roy Cooper
governor.state.nc.us

A settlement between the Environmental Protection Agency and the Tennessee Valley Authority includes a payment to North Carolina. The TVA agreed to implement better emissions technology at all of its coal-fired plants including the four closest to North Carolina. Attorney General Roy Cooper filed a lawsuit against the TVA in 2006.

Foreclosures Down in NC

Apr 14, 2011

The number of foreclosures in North Carolina was down in the first quarter of 2011. That's according to a report from RealTrac, a firm that tracks foreclosures. But the number is down due to a logjam of foreclosures for lenders, not because there are fewer people going into foreclosure. Banks are being investigated for lending practices that led to the mortgage meltdown. Daren Blomquist with RealTrac says the seemingly good news is artificial.

A state trust fund that provides money for water pollution cleanup could shrink significantly under the budget proposed by the state House. That's according to Richard Rogers, the Chief Executive of the Clean Water Management Trust Fund. He says the House budget appropriates 10 million dollars to the trust fund, 80 percent less than the 50 million proposed by Governor Bev Perdue in her budget.

Pages