Jeremy Loeb

Reporter

Ways to Connect

Creative people are more likely to cheat and lie. That's according to a new study out of Duke University. Dan Ariely is a Professor of Behavioral Economics at Duke and co-author of the study. He says the research shows the ability to think creatively makes someone more likely to use that ability for personal gain.

Corolla Wild Horses
corollawildhorses.com

The death of a two-week old horse in Corolla has led a conservation group to hire beach patrols to educate the public about the wild horses that roam there. The horse died after being fed, which is against the law. Karen McCalpin is Executive Director of the Corolla Wild Horse Fund. She says her small staff wasn't able to adequately protect the horses in their 11 mile, 75-hundred acre habitat.

A picture of a yellow NCDOT truck.
ncdot.org

The North Carolina Department of Transportation is expanding its driver assistance patrols to interstate between major cities. The Incident Management Assistance Patrol, or IMAP, has increased its number of yellow trucks on areas between Charlotte and Raleigh. That includes Davidson, Randolph, and Rowan Counties along I-85. IMAP directs traffic in the event of major accidents and helps with broken down vehicles to improve congestion. Sam Whittington is the Regional Instant Management Engineer for the Triad.

Cumberland County is in danger of losing its only rape crisis center. Rape Crisis Volunteers of Cumberland County Director Deanne Hardin, says they didn't get an expected $35,000 private grant. She says their board of directors informed her last week there wouldn't be money to pay the staff's three employees.

ncdrought.org
ncdrought.org

State officials are taking steps to stay on top of the drought in North Carolina that's becoming more and more severe. The North Carolina Drought Management Advisory Council met July 21st in Williamston face-to-face in an acknowledgement of the severity of the issue. The focus of the meeting was mostly on the drought's impact on agriculture in the eastern part of the state. A recent federal map classified most of eastern North Carolina in the "severe" drought category. Ten counties in the southeast were listed in the "extreme" drought category. Spokeswoman for the State Division of Water Resources Sarah Young says the last time we saw extreme drought conditions was in December of 2008.

A sulfur-melting plant proposed near Morehead City has provoked a public outcry. Tom Pasztor, Senior Director of Corporate and Government Relations for the Potash Corporation says they need the plant in order to produce fertilizers, agricultural feed and industrial products. The Potash Corporation is the parent company of PCS Phosphates. PCS already uses sulfur to produce fertilizers and agricultural feeds at a facility in Aurora, North Carolina. The plant would allow them to melt dry sulfur that arrives at the port.

Water contamination at Camp Lejeune is the subject of a public forum today in Wilmington. Experts estimate close to a million people at Camp Lejeune might have been exposed to contaminated water between the 1950's and 1980's. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry will host the session. Previous meetings have been held at the agency's headquarters in Atlanta. But they're holding the meeting in Wilmington because of the large number of affected residents in North Carolina.

Marines at Camp Lejeune are welcoming the shipment of locally-produced biofuel. 800 gallons were delivered today as a demonstration of the capability of biofuel in North Carolina. The delivery is part of the efforts of the North Carolina Eastern Region's Military Growth Task Force. George Miller is the Program Manager for the Food and Fuel Program for the task force. He says the crop was grown in eastern North Carolina in Jones and Craven Counties, turned into 100 percent biofuel at the Piedmont Biofuels refinery in Pittsboro, then sent to Potter Oil back east.

Memory device
ncsu.edu

A team of researchers at NC State has high hopes their creation could lead to much larger innovations. They've developed a simple memory device, a primitive version of what you'd find in your computer. Except this one is made of a Jell-O-like substance. It's soft and squishy and can function underwater. Michael Dickey is an assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at NC State. He says the device is notable not just because of its mechanical properties.

A homeless shelter for women veterans in Fayetteville is getting a makeover. The ABC reality television program "Extreme Makeover Home Edition," selected the shelter run by former Navy officer Barbara Marshall. Her organization Steps-n-Stages works to house women vets in the home. It will be renovated by a company called Blue Ridge Log Cabins. The show has also partnered with the USO of North Carolina to organize a food drive for the Second Harvest Food Bank. Renee Lane is director of the Fort Bragg Center of the USO of North Carolina. She says there will be a big food drive this Sunday in Festival Park in downtown Fayetteville.

Defense attorneys have decided to present evidence during jury selection in the murder trial of Robert Stewart. He's accused of shooting and killing eight people two years ago at the Pinelake Health and Rehabilitation Center in Moore County. Stewart's attorneys say he was under the influence of alcohol and prescription drugs at the time and is not legally responsible for his actions. Defense lawyers are showing potential jurors graphic images of the shootings and Stewart admitted this week during jury selection he killed the victims.

Cary Arts Center Opens

Jul 13, 2011
Cary Courthouse
townofcary.org

The town of Cary has opened a new cultural arts center. The official dedication for the Cary Arts Center isn't until August 13th. But it's already open and bustling with activity. The Brussels Chamber Orchestra is performing there this week. And kids of all ages are painting and sculpting in larger classrooms. Joy Ennis is the Festival Coordinator for the town. She says the new center gives the Cary Cultural Arts Program much more class space than it had previously.

Researchers at UNC Chapel Hill will be leading an effort to find a cure for HIV AIDS. The National Institutes of Health awarded a $32 million, 5-year grant to UNC. That money will then be distributed to 19 different laboratories at 9 different academic institutions. David Margolis is a professor of medicine, microbiology, and immunology in the UNC School of Medicine and is a lead researcher with the project. He says previous efforts have lead to anti-retroviral drugs that have improved and prolonged the life of people with HIV.

The world we live in is a complex, evolving ecosystem. North Carolina State University ecologist and evolutionary biologist Rob Dunn wanted to explore how mankind’s interaction with other living species has come to define who we are and why we act the way we do. He found that the human body itself plays host to a myriad of living creatures, some good and some bad, and that our relationships with these life forms are as mysterious as they are vital to our existence.

Deep Budget Cuts

Jun 28, 2011

North Carolina’s General Assembly recently passed the budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1st. The $19.7 billion budget was vetoed by Democratic Governor Bev Perdue. But a handful of Democrats sided with Republicans, giving them enough votes to override that veto.

NC Clean Energy Data Book
energync.org

People interested in North Carolina's clean energy economy will now find much of what they're looking for in one source. The non-profit North Carolina Sustainable Energy Association has released a book that compiles various data, maps, and charts on North Carolina's green infrastructure.
Spokeswoman Julie Robinson says there isn't just one dominant source of clean energy.

A commonly used image of Lowry.
www.ncmuseumofhistory.org

Henry Berry Lowry was a Lumbee Indian sometimes described as the “Robin Hood” of Robeson County, North Carolina. But Lowry’s story is much more nuanced than that. He’s a hero to some, a murderer to others. All told, Lowry and his gang of outlaws were responsible for some two dozen killings as the Civil War ended and during Reconstruction.

RBC bank
RBC

PNC Financial has announced that it will buy Raleigh-based RBC Bank in a move that will allow the Pittsburgh-based bank to expand into the South. The deal is worth nearly $3.5 billion. Jim Westlake is the CEO of RBC Bank in Raleigh. He says he doesn't know yet what the local impact will be.

Moonshine

Jun 14, 2011

Charlie Thompson wanted to learn more about his grandfather’s history in moonshine, so began investigating his hometown and the “Moonshine Capital of the World,” Franklin County, Virginia. What he found was a complicated picture of poverty and necessity juxtaposed with a hierarchy of power that was revealed during a famous conspiracy trial in 1935.

Tom Maxwell

Jun 10, 2011
tommaxwell.com

Tom Maxwell is best known for his time spent with the Chapel Hill ‘90s group the Squirrel Nut Zippers, but a lot has happened since then. His then 3-year-old son Esten was diagnosed with Leukemia and has completed treatment.  Maxwell is writing a memoir about that experience and about his time with the Squirrel Nut Zippers. He's started a Kickstarter project to help pay for that project.  And now he’s releasing his second solo record, “Kingdom Come.” The CD release party is at Motorco in Durham tonight at 8 p.m.

Restorative justice is a theory of justice that emphasizes healing rather than punishing. The idea is to repair the harm for everyone involved: the victims, the offenders, and the community. The Campbell University School of Law in Raleigh plays host to the third annual National Conference on Restorative Justice June 8-10 at the Sheraton Hotel in Raleigh. Host Frank Stasio talks about restorative justice with Therese Bartholomew, producer and director of “The Final Gift,” a film about her brother’s murder and her attempt to reconcile with his killer; Howard Zehr, professor of restorative justice at Eastern Mennonite University, and Amy Elliott, co-founder of the Restorative Justice Project in Durham.

A statewide advocacy group is launching a new program to raise awareness of pool safety. The campaign by "Safe Kids North Carolina" aims to improve safety at pools and encourage simple steps that can save lives. Director Kelly Ransdell says about 400 kids under the age of 14 drown in pools and spas each year in the United States.

The recession has highlighted the need for a more educated workforce. That's according to "The State of the North Carolina Workforce 2011-2020" report. Kenneth Poole is CEO and President of the Center for Regional Economic Competitiveness.

A Lowe's home improvement store in Sanford all but leveled by the April 16th tornados will be rebuilt. Construction will begin May 25th at the same site where Lowe's employees rushed customers to safety as the tornados approached. Bob Bridwell is the Director of Planning and Development for Sanford and Lee County.

Bob Bridwell: "Lowes is the symbol of our storm damage here in Lee County. It's also the symbol of our recovery. So seeing this come back to life for the rest of the town I think is extremely important."

A former Alcoa smelting plant in Stanly County will now be home to an electronics recycling center. 

Solar energy industry leaders are gathered in Raleigh for a 5 day national conference. It's the 40th year for the National Solar Conference held by the American Solar Energy Society. This year it's being held at the Raleigh Convention Center. The public is invited to the final day of the conference this Saturday.

Town commissioners in Hope Mills have a plan for repairing the broken Hope Mills Dam. The dam failed last June leaving the Hope Mills Lake dry. The town's attorney presented the plan during a commissioner's meeting this week. It calls for repairing the existing dam rather than building a new one. The companies that built the dam will repair it at their expense. Mayor Eddie Dees says he's happy to have the plan.

Durham health officials want to ban smoking in a number of public places, including all county and city grounds, athletic fields, playgrounds, and bus stops. Gayle Harris is director of the Durham County Health Department.

Huge crowd of fans turn out to see Scotty McCreery on Saturday
Jeremy Loeb

 

  This week, Garner native Scotty McCreery will perform in the final three of the American Idol tv show. The newly-minted 17 year old star was welcomed home over the weekend with a made-for-tv celebration. 

Scotty McCreery
americanidol.com

  The Town of Garner is getting ready to welcome home "American Idol" finalist Scotty McCreery. Jeremy Loeb reports.

 The 17-year-old baritone advanced to the "Final 3" of the television show "American Idol" last night. McCreery has been wowing audiences with his mature, deep-voiced renditions of country classics. Mayor Ronnie Williams called the singer's success the biggest thing that's ever happened to Garner.

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