Jeff Tiberii

Capitol Bureau Chief

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to strangers after dinner at La Cantina Italiana, in Massachusetts, when he was two-years-old. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Ma., an avid fan of the Boston Celtics, and took summer vacations to Acadia National Park (in Maine) with his family.  He graduated from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse), WFDD (Winston-Salem) and now  WUNC, dates back 12 years. 

He works in the Capitol Bureau in downtown Raleigh. Jeff started at WUNC as the Greensboro Bureau Chief, in September of 2011. He has reported on a range of topics, including higher education, the military, federal courts, politics, coal ash, aviation, craft beer, opiate addiction and college athletics.

His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here & Now. Jeff’s work has been recognized with four regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, and dozens of other honors. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad.

If you have a story, question or thought find him at or @J_tibs

Ways to Connect

photo of the NC legislature

Two controversial bills are scheduled for debate in legislative committees Wednesday afternoon. One of the proposals has undergone significant changes prior to debate. Some are calling those alterations completely unrelated.

NC Legislative building
NC General Assembly

Following delays, divisions and more than eight hours of debate House lawmakers gave approval to a $22 billion state budget early Friday.

The plan increases state spending by more than a billion dollars, though the road to passage was hardly smooth. Deliberations on the measure were delayed by more than a day following criticism of the budget draft from some members and conservative groups.

N.C. General Assembly, State Legislature
Dave DeWitt / WUNC


Updated Thursday, May 21, 4:45 p.m.

N.C. House lawmakers have started debating a proposed budget plan that leaders revamped in an effort to win more votes from Republicans. The proposal reduces DMV fee hikes and cuts back on the money to help bring film and TV productions to North Carolina.

North Carolina State Legislature
Dave Crosby / Flickr

Like a flight that keeps getting delayed, House budget deliberations never took off on Wednesday.

The setbacks points to the slow, complex process of passing a state spending plan. They also hint at some divisions and philosophical differences within the Republican Party.

The $22.2 billion budget draft unveiled earlier this week has faced criticism from some conservatives.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Lawmakers in the North Carolina House will debate a two-year spending plan Wednesday. Discussion over the budget draft began last week.

This $22.2 billion proposal would increase state spending by more than $1.3 billion, or six percent.

Lead budget writer Republican Nelson Dollar quickly attributed much of that boost to enrollment growth in Medicaid, public schools and the UNC system.

The House budget also includes $158 million dollars in grants and incentives. It provides raises to all state employees and increases funds for charter school vouchers.

The North Carolina legislative office building

North Carolina lawmakers have introduced a plan to increase state spending by more than $1 billion.

The budget draft introduced Monday afternoon would grow starting teacher salaries, give state employees a 2% raise and put $120 million toward a film grant program. The $22.2 billion draft budget roughly represents a 5% increase compared to the current state spending plan.

N.C. General Assembly, State Legislature
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

North Carolina House representatives are introducing parts of their two year spending plan.

Education, Health and Human Services, transportation, and judicial appropriation committee meetings take place throughout Thursday as policy makers begin to digest parts of a $21 billion state spending plan.

An image of a tanning bed in use

Legislation that would ban minors from using tanning beds is heading to the Governor's desk. State Senators gave overwhelming support to House Bill 158 - "The Teen Skin Cancer Prevention Act" on Wednesday afternoon.

This proposal would ban anyone under 18 from using a tanning bed. Presently, teenagers ages 14 to 17 can artificially tan with written parental consent. A similar proposal died in the Senate two years ago after it did not receive a vote.

Pat McCrory
Dave DeWitt

Governor Pat McCrory and Senate Leader Phil Berger expect debate on an economic development measure this month. The powerful Republicans had lunch together Tuesday, and hours later spoke at an NC Chamber event in Raleigh.

McCrory said he “expects action and debate in the next two weeks and I think that’s very good news.”

An image of chickens on farm
Charlie Neibergall / Associated Press


North Carolina officials are closely monitoring an outbreak of the avian bird flu spreading in the Midwest and Western United States. Thirty million birds have either died from the disease, or have been killed as a preventive measure to control the flu from spreading, according the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The North Carolina Legislative Building
Dave Crosby / flickr

Lawmakers are weighing in on Volvo's decision to bring at least 2,000 jobs to South Carolina. The car maker announced Monday that it plans to open a production facility outside of Charleston.

Unemployment lines

State officials have paid down $2.8 billion owed to the federal government. The debt came from money used to pay unemployment benefits during the recession.

That debt climbed to $2.8 billion in early 2013. Months later, lawmakers then passed controversial House Bill 4, which did the following:

Dorothea Dix campus
Ted Buckner / Flickr/Creative Commons

State officials voted unanimously Tuesday morning to sell the Dorothea Dix Hospital campus to the City of Raleigh for $52 million. This deal is more than a decade in the making.

The long-term plan is to transform the 300-plus acre site into a downtown park. Governor Pat McCrory said he hopes it becomes a destination for citizens across the state.

NC State House

Policymakers at the General Assembly are pushing through dozens of measures with a Thursday deadline looming.

On Tuesday, Representatives pushed through about 30 measures. Most of the bills now heading to the Senate passed following little contention or debate, and with overwhelming support. Among the proposals:

School Boards Keep Power To Sue

The Screen Gems Studios is the largest facility of its kind in the U.S., east of Los Angeles.
Jeff Tiberii

For more than 30 years, the Wilmington area has been a hub for the filming of movies, TV shows and commercials.  Dawson’s Creek and Iron Man 3 are among the hundreds of productions cast in the region.

But earlier this year, a tax credit designed to incentivize the industry expired. Now business owners say with only a few productions remaining, the economic effects are significant.

Port City Signs is a small shop situated along a busy road in this coastal community. It has been around since the 1940s, printing signs, vehicle wraps or decals, and other art.

Thousand of Cameron Crazies cheered on Duke Monday, beneath the banners representing the schools previous championships. A fifth title will be honored later this year.
Jeff Tiberii

Duke is again champion of the college basketball world. The Blue Devils topped Wisconsin 68-63 last night in Indianapolis, claiming the fifth men’s Division 1 basketball title in school history.

Millions of viewers around the world watched as two freshmen helped to further cement the legacy of Coach Mike Krzyzewski. A few thousand fans watched the come-from-behind victory together, in some familiar seats.

The House debated SB 353 today.
Screen Shot, WRAL Broadcast

Republican lawmakers are proposing changes to North Carolina abortion laws. A bill filed Wednesday would ban employees at state university medical schools from performing abortions and require a longer waiting period before the procedure is allowed.

Rep. Tim Moore is the GOP's choice for Speaker of the House
NC General Assembly

North Carolina House Speaker Tim Moore says a religious freedom bill is not moving forward anytime soon.

The controversial measure filed last week would give private business owners the ability to deny service to someone based on their personal religious beliefs.

Opponents say it will lead to discrimination against gays, lesbians, and potentially others in the state. During a hastily called news conference Tuesday afternoon, Moore said he needs to see how the bill would help North Carolina's brand.

Picture of WUNC microphone and control room board
Keith Weston / WUNC

Trustees at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill are changing the organizational structure of North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC.

A governing board will be created to oversee the radio station. The board will be made up of several trustees, several appointees made by the trustees, Vice Chancellor for Communications and Public Affairs Joel Curran, and WUNC President and General Manager Connie Walker.

The station has not previously been governed by its own board. Currently, Walker reports to Curran, who reports to UNC Chancellor Carol Folt. 

A Rooms To Go billboard.
Jeff Tiberii

They’ve been called a deal breaker, a necessary evil, and largely useless.

Lawmakers are debating the role of economic incentives. Growing the economy is a complicated and arduous process. Senators approved a short-term allocation for incentives yesterday. The long-term funding plan is not as clear.

All vehicles traveling north on I-95 about halfway between Raleigh and Fayetteville pass a massive construction site in Dunn.  The unfinished building is longer than a football field.

Wake County

At the Capitol, two controversial redistricting bills are heading for debate on the Senate floor. One would modify the boundaries for Wake County Commissioner seats. The other would change the maps for Greensboro City Council districts. Supporters say these measures improve representation. Opponents want state lawmakers to leave local governments alone.

Governor Pat McCrory has amended a state ethics form to include travel expenditures that were previously omitted. 

The form, submitted on Friday and officially filed Monday, shows seven trips valued at more than $13,000.

Gov. Pat McCrory
Governor's Office

Governor Pat McCrory is proposing raises for new teachers, tax incentives for corporations and a cut to the University system. On Thursday morning, the governor laid out his budget proposal for the next fiscal year.

Governor McCrory detailed his spending blueprint for the fiscal year that begins July 1st. His 298-page, $21.5 billion proposal is just the first step in a long process.

Photo: The North Carolina General Assembly's Legislative Building
Jorge Valencia

State legislators sparred over job incentives and a change to the gas tax during finance and appropriation committees meetings Tuesday. The bills eventually made it out.

There was opposition from both liberals and some conservatives over the tax breaks designed to lure jobs.

Secretary of Commerce John Skvarla told one committee nobody likes incentives, but that the state must be competitive. The Governor has been pushing for extended and expanded incentives.

snow at the General Assembly building, Raleigh
Dave DeWitt

Some Republicans are calling on leaders at the General Assembly to again change when the state will hold its presidential primary.  Two years ago lawmakers decided to make the primary earlier - on the first Tuesday after South Carolina's, next February. State GOP Chairman Claude Pope now wants the primary moved to March 1st. He says the national Republican Party is threatening to take away delegates from North Carolina for the earlier primary. Republican state Senator Andrew Brock disagrees.