Jeff Tiberii

Capitol Bureau Chief

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to strangers after dinner at La Cantina Italiana, in Massachusetts, when he was two-years-old. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Ma., an avid fan of the Boston Celtics, and took summer vacations to Acadia National Park (in Maine) with his family.  He graduated from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse), WFDD (Winston-Salem) and now  WUNC, dates back 12 years. 

He works in the Capitol Bureau in downtown Raleigh. Jeff started at WUNC as the Greensboro Bureau Chief, in September of 2011. He has reported on a range of topics, including higher education, the military, federal courts, politics, coal ash, aviation, craft beer, opiate addiction and college athletics.

His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here & Now. Jeff’s work has been recognized with six regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, and dozens of other honors. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad.

If you have a story, question or thought find him at JTiberii@WUNC.org or @J_tibs

Ways to Connect

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WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

This week the General Assembly passed legislation to strip powers from the executive branch. Democratic lawmakers, and hundreds of angry protesters, said this was simply a power grab as a Republican governor is about to be replaced by a Democrat.

WUNC reporters Jeff Tiberii and Jess Clark spent many hours on Jones Street this week covering all the action. They got together in this week's WUNCPolitics Podcast to recap a wild week.

Protesters Jenny Lynch of Apex, left, and Heidi Alcock of Chapel Hill.
Jess Clark / WUNC

The General Assembly building on Jones Street in downtown Raleigh literally shook Friday as protesters reached a boiling point over bills Republican lawmakers had pushed through during a surprise special session.

Despite the protests, lawmakers concluded the session Friday afternoon, passing two bills that curb the powers of incoming Democratic governor Roy Cooper.

Protesters descended on the N.C. General Assembly Thursday evening.
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

After an acrimonious day that led to protests and arrests, lawmakers are likely to give final approval Friday to bills that would remove executive powers.

On Thursday, hundreds of protesters gathered at the N.C. General Assembly to voice their opposition to these Republican policy proposals and chanted in unison, "Shame! Shame! Shame! Shame! Forward together, not one step back!"

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

North Carolina legislative building
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

A wild day at the North Carolina General Assembly began with bipartisan support for a $200 million disaster relief bill and ended with an unscheduled special session, dozens of new bills, and an effort to remove some authority from Democratic Governor-elect Roy Cooper.

In a chaotic scene of political theater, Republicans flexed their legislative muscles and proposed a series of provisions that would remove certain powers from the Executive Branch, including the Secretary of State and Governor. 

North Carolina legislative building
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

State lawmakers will convene for yet another special session Wednesday afternoon. The fourth extra legislative gathering of 2016 follows a two-day effort to pass the Disaster Relief Act, a $201 million dollar funding bill to help victims of hurricane flooding and mountain wildfires.

protesters inside the General Assembly
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

UPDATED Tuesday, December 13, 2016 at 7:05 p.m. The state House voted unanimously Tuesday night to pass their version of a disaster relief measure. The bill goes onto the Senate for further debate Wednesday.

North Carolina legislative building
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

State lawmakers will convene in Raleigh Tuesday to deal with disaster relief, but the agenda is open-ended.

Lame duck Republican Governor Pat McCrory called this gathering to deal with disaster relief stemming from Hurricane Matthew and mountain wildfires in western North Carolina, as well as “for the purpose of addressing any other matters the General Assembly elects to consider.”

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, David McLennan, professor of political science at Meredith College, stops by to chat about executive transitions, a looming special session, the color purple and street meat.

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory
Hal Goodtree / Flickr Creative Commons

Incumbent Governor Pat McCrory conceded in his reelection bid after several weeks of disputing the results. The governor congratulated Governor-Elect Roy Cooper in a video message. 

Pat McCrory
Catie Ball / WUNC

It took 28 days.

Following weeks of unfounded voter fraud allegations, conspiracy theories that the legislature could intervene in the outcome, and expectations that this race would end up in the courts, North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory stood down.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

Durham election officials have been ordered to do a machine recount on more than 90,000 ballots after technical challenges on election night. Late Thursday, the State Board of Elections gave Durham a Monday deadline to complete that recount.

Image of a judge's gavel
Wikipedia

A three-judge panel of a federal court ordered the North Carolina legislature to redraw their district lines and hold a new election next year. The court found 28 of the state house and senate districts were unconstitutionally racially gerrymandered. The decision requires the redrawing of the lines and shortens all the terms of members elected earlier this month to one year. 

Pat McCrory
Catie Ball / WUNC

North Carolina's State Board of Elections has ordered Durham County to recount tens of thousands of ballots cast during early voting, reversing the decision of the county board a couple of weeks ago.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

Republican incumbent Pat McCrory trails Democrat Roy Cooper by more than 6,100 votes in the ongoing race for North Carolina's governor.

In the two weeks since Election Day, McCrory’s campaign has called for all provisional and absentee ballots to be counted, while raising dozens of claims of voter fraud. As more votes have been tabulated, Cooper’s lead has increased.

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Roy Cooper addresses supporters at a rally in Raleigh on Election night.
Brian Batista / WUNC

The protracted gubernatorial race continues across North Carolina. Counties face a deadline to certify local results by the end of the day. Some will do just that, but many others will need an extension into next week to finalize vote counts. And in Durham, an evidentiary hearing takes place to determine if paper ballots should be recounted, following a computer glitch.

Stack of Ballots for Super Tuesday
Wikimedia

The race for the state's highest office is still in limbo. County Boards of Elections are counting provisional ballots this week. Attorney General Roy Cooper leads Governor Pat McCrory by several thousand votes. But McCrory says the race is not over. Host Frank Stasio talks with capital bureau chief Jeff Tiberii about the latest. 

 

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Roy Cooper addresses supporters at a rally in Raleigh on Election night.
Brian Batista / WUNC

A special hearing will be held Friday at the Durham County Board of Elections to examine its handling of ballots on Election Night.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

The 2016 election is, almost entirely, complete. Republican Donald Trump carried the state's 15 electoral votes en route to winning the presidency, voters granted Republican Richard Burr a third term in the U.S. Senate, and the state saw another ticket-split.

Roy and Kristin Cooper
Gerry Broome / AP

The governor’s race between Republican Pat McCrory and Democrat Roy Cooper is not over yet. After more than a year of campaigning, the two rivals are separated by fewer than 5,000 votes and this gubernatorial battle is very likely headed for a recount.

Photo: A voting ballot
Flickr Creative Commons/ Ken Zirkel

The 2016 election cycle will hopefully come to a close tonight. Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump is expected to become the 45th president-elect of the United States. Yet while that divisive race has dominated the airwaves for much of 2016, many other contests hang in the balance on this Election Day.

Photo: A Massachusetts voting station sign
Katri Niemi / Flickr

The 2016 election cycle has been strange, unorthodox, offensive, entertaining, unpredictable, divisive and long.

For more than a year, strategists have tried to use scandals, wedge issues and the media, among other political tools, as candidates chase victory on Election Night. But now, it all comes down to numbers. Here are a few to consider in the final stretch of the campaign.

a vote here sign in Carrboro
Elizabeth Baier / WUNC

Jennifer Lietzke picks up toys in the playroom of her Cary home. One son is napping; the other is at school. That offers her a rare moment of relative quiet -- to reflects on politics.

a vote here sign in Carrboro
Elizabeth Baier / WUNC

Millions of North Carolinians will cast ballots this election – and millions will not. With the cacophony of attack ads, character assaults and ambiguous policy positions at a fevered pitch, perhaps the most important political question these days – will you vote?

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics podcast, we talk with Loretta Boniti, a senior political reporter at Time Warner Cable.

The countdown to Election Day is on, and candidates are hitting the trail in North Carolina. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump visited the state earlier this week and democratic nominee Hillary Clinton stops in Winston-Salem later today, in a joint appearance with first lady Michelle Obama. What do the presidential campaigns do for candidates down ballot? And how close is the gubernatorial race? Host Frank Stasio talks with WUNC capitol bureau chief Jeff Tiberii about the latest. 

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, host Jeff Tiberii talks with Jason deBruyn, WUNC’s data reporter, about the races in play - and the potential balance of power - in the North Carolina General Assembly (and Jason's strong sock game).

Governor Pat McCrory talks with reporters after the final gubernatorial debate on Tuesday, October 18, 2016.
Logan Ulrich / WUNC

With early voting set to begin, North Carolina residents got another side-by-side look of Governor Pat McCrory and Attorney General Roy Cooper Tuesday night. The two sparred – along with Libertarian Lon Cecil - over a range of topics in their final scheduled gubernatorial debate.

Orange County GOP Office
Credit: NC GOP

Updated 10:26 a.m., October 18, 2016

 

The Orange County Democratic Party says someone spray-painted its headquarters in Carrboro on the same day someone set fire to the Republican headquarters in Hillsborough. 

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