Jeff Tiberii

Capitol Bureau Chief

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to strangers after dinner at La Cantina Italiana, in Massachusetts, when he was two-years-old. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Ma., an avid fan of the Boston Celtics, and took summer vacations to Acadia National Park (in Maine) with his family.  He graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse), WFDD (Winston-Salem) and now  WUNC, dates back 11 years. 

He works in the Capitol Bureau with Jorge Valencia and Reema Khrais. Jeff started at WUNC, as the Greensboro Bureau Chief, in September of 2011. He covered a range of topics, including higher education, the military, federal courts, politics, coal ash, and college athletics.

His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here & Now. Jeff’s work has been recognized with four regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, and dozens of other honors. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad.

If you have a story, question or thought find him at or @J_tibs

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N.C. General Assembly, State Legislature
Dave DeWitt


Updated Thursday, May 21, 4:45 p.m.

N.C. House lawmakers have started debating a proposed budget plan that leaders revamped in an effort to win more votes from Republicans. The proposal reduces DMV fee hikes and cuts back on the money to help bring film and TV productions to North Carolina.

North Carolina State Legislature
Dave Crosby / Flickr

Like a flight that keeps getting delayed, House budget deliberations never took off on Wednesday.

The setbacks points to the slow, complex process of passing a state spending plan. They also hint at some divisions and philosophical differences within the Republican Party.

The $22.2 billion budget draft unveiled earlier this week has faced criticism from some conservatives.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Lawmakers in the North Carolina House will debate a two-year spending plan Wednesday. Discussion over the budget draft began last week.

This $22.2 billion proposal would increase state spending by more than $1.3 billion, or six percent.

Lead budget writer Republican Nelson Dollar quickly attributed much of that boost to enrollment growth in Medicaid, public schools and the UNC system.

The House budget also includes $158 million dollars in grants and incentives. It provides raises to all state employees and increases funds for charter school vouchers.

The North Carolina legislative office building

North Carolina lawmakers have introduced a plan to increase state spending by more than $1 billion.

The budget draft introduced Monday afternoon would grow starting teacher salaries, give state employees a 2% raise and put $120 million toward a film grant program. The $22.2 billion draft budget roughly represents a 5% increase compared to the current state spending plan.

N.C. General Assembly, State Legislature
Dave DeWitt

North Carolina House representatives are introducing parts of their two year spending plan.

Education, Health and Human Services, transportation, and judicial appropriation committee meetings take place throughout Thursday as policy makers begin to digest parts of a $21 billion state spending plan.

An image of a tanning bed in use

Legislation that would ban minors from using tanning beds is heading to the Governor's desk. State Senators gave overwhelming support to House Bill 158 - "The Teen Skin Cancer Prevention Act" on Wednesday afternoon.

This proposal would ban anyone under 18 from using a tanning bed. Presently, teenagers ages 14 to 17 can artificially tan with written parental consent. A similar proposal died in the Senate two years ago after it did not receive a vote.

Pat McCrory
Dave DeWitt

Governor Pat McCrory and Senate Leader Phil Berger expect debate on an economic development measure this month. The powerful Republicans had lunch together Tuesday, and hours later spoke at an NC Chamber event in Raleigh.

McCrory said he “expects action and debate in the next two weeks and I think that’s very good news.”

An image of chickens on farm
Charlie Neibergall / Associated Press


North Carolina officials are closely monitoring an outbreak of the avian bird flu spreading in the Midwest and Western United States. Thirty million birds have either died from the disease, or have been killed as a preventive measure to control the flu from spreading, according the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The North Carolina Legislative Building
Dave Crosby / flickr

Lawmakers are weighing in on Volvo's decision to bring at least 2,000 jobs to South Carolina. The car maker announced Monday that it plans to open a production facility outside of Charleston.

Unemployment lines

State officials have paid down $2.8 billion owed to the federal government. The debt came from money used to pay unemployment benefits during the recession.

That debt climbed to $2.8 billion in early 2013. Months later, lawmakers then passed controversial House Bill 4, which did the following: