Jeff Tiberii

Greensboro Bureau Chief

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to complete strangers at the age of 2. Following a meal at La Cantina Italiana, Jeff climbed down from the booth and began asking other customers what was going on. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Massachusetts, graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse) and WFDD (Winston-Salem) dates back almost 10 years. Jeff grew up rooting for the Tar Heels (Donald Williams, Dante Calabria) and remains an avid basketball fan. He also works for IMG College as a Network Studio Host in Winston-Salem.

Jeff has covered a Presidential Inauguration, three NCAA Tournaments, another three ACC Men’s Tournaments, the wreckage of a plane crash, and the John Edwards Trial. His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here & Now. Jeff’s work has been recognized with three regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, and dozens of other honors. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad. Jeff began as the Greensboro Bureau Chief in September of 2011.

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Environment
4:31 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

Today In Coal Ash: More Subpoenas, DENR On The Defense

Tom Augspurger (l), USFWS, taking core sample during February 8th reconnaissance of Dan River coal ash spill. (l-r) Tom Augsperger, USFWS, John Fridell, USFWS, Rick Smith, Duke Energy.
Credit Steve Alexander / USFWS

Federal prosecutors have handed out more subpoenas in a criminal investigation stemming from the recent coal ash spill in Eden. The government is seeking documents from 20 current and former employees at the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR). Prosecutors are also calling on those individuals to testify before a grand jury. The subpoenas seek records related to cash, items of value or investments that state employees might have received from Duke.

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Environment
9:07 am
Wed February 19, 2014

DENR To Duke Energy: Stop Using Other Stormwater Pipe

The Dan River was affected by the coal ash spill. It flows through Danville, VA
Credit Jeff Tiberii

State officials with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) have told Duke Energy to stop using a stormwater pipe running under a coal ash pond in Eden.

State officials with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) have told Duke Energy to stop using a stormwater pipe running under a coal ash pond in Eden. (This is a different pipe than the one that ruptured 17 days ago, causing the third largest coal ash spill in U.S. history.) Following that spill at a retire coal fired power plant north of Greensboro, many environmentalists and media members questioned the durability of this second, smaller pipe. Duke has said repeatedly this pipe is structurally sound and water running through it, is clean. DENR tested some water and determined that not to be the case.

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Arts & Culture
6:33 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

Civil Rights Museum Lifts Tour Guide Requirement

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum
Credit Jeff Tiberii

Members of the Greensboro City Council will get an update Tuesday afternoon about the downtown Civil Rights Museum.  Leaders in Greensboro were upset to learn late last week that part of a loan they approved was paid out before a written agreement went into place.  The city council agree d last fall to provide the Civil Rights Museum with a $1.5 million loan. 

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Environment
7:28 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Duke Energy And DENR Receive Subpoenas Related To Coal Ash Spill

The Dan River flows through Danville, VA 22 miles down stream from the site of a coal ash spill in Eden. Officials say treated water there remains safe to drink.
Credit Jeff Tiberii

The federal government has issued subpoenas to Duke Energy and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR). The U.S. Attorney is investigating a suspected felony. The subpoenas dated Monday seek a wide range of documents, reports and photographs related to the recent coal ash spill into the Dan River. It’s not clear what felony the federal government suspects Duke or DENR of having committed. A metal pipe beneath a coal ash pond ruptured 11 days ago, sending potentially toxic material into the river. 

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Environment
7:21 am
Wed February 12, 2014

Many Questions, Few Answers About Eden NC Coal Ash Spill

The Dan River flows through Danville, VA
Credit Jeff Tiberii

Jeff Tiberii reports on a public meeting related to the recent coal ash spill in Eden, NC.

More than 100 people filled the city hall chambers in Danville, Virginia last night. They heard from federal and state officials about clean-up efforts following a recent coal ash spill in Eden, NC. A pipe underneath a coal ash pond there ruptured ten days ago,

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Politics & Government
2:00 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

NC County Will Trade Vintage Bonnie And Clyde Style Machine Guns For New Weapons

Vintage Tommy Guns
Credit Forsyth County Sheriff's Office

Commissioners in Forsyth County voted last night to allow the Sheriff's office to trade antique guns for new weapons. The Sheriff now can trade two 1928 fully automatic Thompson submachine guns for 88 new semi-automatic Bushmaster rifles.

Our original story about the trade 1/13/14:

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Arts & Culture
7:27 am
Sat February 8, 2014

Behind The Big Top: A Conversation With An Elephant Handler

A baby elephant peeks through a fence at The Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey circus in Greensboto
Jeff Tiberii

The 'Greatest Show On Earth' arrived in Greensboro this week. The Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey circus has been performing for nearly a century. That longevity has led to some circus family traditions that cover multiple generations. 

Young children in strollers and on shoulders are trying to contain their excitement as they wait on the side of the road across from the train tracks in Greensboro. And then, at dusk, from over a hill come a few elephants and several horses.

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Around the Nation
6:09 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

More Than 80,000 Tons Of Coal Ash Flow Into N.C. River

Volunteers with the Dan River Basin Association, graduate students from Duke University and staff with the environmental group Appalachian Voices collect water samples on the Dan River after a massive coal ash spill.
Eric Chance Appalachian Voices

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 10:23 pm

Over the weekend at an old power plant in Eden, N.C., a stormwater pipe that goes under a coal ash pond broke, sending about 82,000 tons of ash into the Dan River.

The river stretches more than 200 miles from North Carolina, through Virginia and into the Atlantic Ocean. It's home to all sorts of wildlife, and a popular destination for fishermen and kayakers.

On Wednesday, Jennifer Edwards, with the Dan River Basin Association, was checking the water and sediment about a mile downriver from the spill.

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Education
7:28 am
Fri January 31, 2014

Whistleblower Calls For Reform In Educating Athletes At UNC

UNC Athletics Logo
Credit UNC-Chapel Hill

Mary Willingham is a polarizing name in Chapel Hill these days. The academic advisor at UNC says a majority of football and men’s basketball players are woefully underprepared for the college classroom. University administrators dispute those claims. As the credibility of Willingham’s findings has been called into question, she’s asking how universities can better educate these young men.

The worlds of academics and big-time athletics often operate independently with little overlap. In recent weeks at UNC the two have converged, or maybe more accurately, collided.  

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Environment
7:42 am
Thu January 23, 2014

Committee Charged To Clean-Up Jordan Lake

State lawmakers want to clean up an abundance of algae in Jordan Lake.
Credit Dave DeWitt

A committee of state lawmakers is trying to determine how to best clean-up Jordan Lake. The group met for the first time yesterday.  Jordan Lake has large amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus, which on their own don’t present any significant problem. But when those nutrients sit stagnant in the lake for as long as a year at a time, it leads to toxic algae and chlorophyll.  The state is going to soon start using something called the SolarBee, devices that will move water around and decrease stagnation.

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