Jeff Tiberii

Capitol Bureau Chief

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to strangers after dinner at La Cantina Italiana, in Massachusetts, when he was two-years-old. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Ma., an avid fan of the Boston Celtics, and took summer vacations to Acadia National Park (in Maine) with his family.  He graduated from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse), WFDD (Winston-Salem) and now  WUNC, dates back 12 years. 

He works in the Capitol Bureau with Jorge Valencia and Reema Khrais. Jeff started at WUNC as the Greensboro Bureau Chief, in September of 2011. He covered a range of topics, including higher education, the military, federal courts, politics, coal ash, and college athletics.

His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here & Now. Jeff’s work has been recognized with four regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, and dozens of other honors. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad.

If you have a story, question or thought find him at JTiberii@WUNC.org or @J_tibs

Ways to Connect

Commuters in Winston-Salem board a P.A.R.T. express bus bound for Greensboro
Jeff Tiberii

The Piedmont Authority for Regional Transportation is having its busiest year ever. The bus service connecting Winston-Salem, Greensboro, High Point and many smaller communities in the Triad is 9 years old. Yet despite strong ridership P.A.R.T. is in financial trouble.

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro is hosting a national conference on girls and women in sports.

The three day event will feature speakers from around the country. Presenters will discuss practices for encouraging girls to be physically active, myths about muscles and strength for females in sports, and the role of nutrition before and after physical activity.

President Obama at Guilford Technical Community College
Jeff Tiberii

On Tuesday morning President Obama was in the Triad to promote his American Jobs Act.

Day two of a three-day bus tour brought President Obama to the campus of Guilford Technical Community College. His speech lasted 25 minutes in front of a gymnasium full of spectators. The message deviated slightly from remarks he made in Western North Carolina on Monday.

The Greensboro Police Department is getting a new headquarters.

Earlier this year the city purchased the old IRS building for 1 dollar. The 94,000 square foot building will undergo 900 thousand dollars in renovations during the next three years. But overall the 56-year-old building is in good condition

Greensboro police Captain Mike Richey: "There's really no telling how long this building will last. the structure, the foundation is in great shape and we expect it to last for years to come"

This week one North Carolina company gave Davie County a substantial gift.

Winston-Salem based R.J. Reynolds Tobacco gave the rural county 360 acres of undeveloped land southwest of the city. The gift is expected to help bring manufacturing jobs. Terry Bralley is President of the Davie County Economic Development Commission. He says at least one furniture company is considering a plant in the area.

A new counseling program begins tonight for teens in the Triad.

Text 4 Teens is a program that allows youths to seek support without saying a word. Teenagers can use texting to find help with depression, suicidal thoughts, substance abuse pressures or relationship problems. Michael Cottingham with Center Point Human Services believes using newer technology is the best way to connect.

The State is considering a request from the City of Greensboro to draw water from the Haw River.

Tonight the Division of Water Quality will listen to citizens at the first of several public hearings. As of now Greensboro takes its water from Lakes Higgins, Brandt and Townsend.  Greensboro's Interim Director of Water Resources Kenny McDowell says the proposal to use the Haw would allow the city greater flexibility.

Wake Forest University researchers are participating in a project aimed at better projecting upcoming world events.

Instead of using traditional experts, researchers are now enlisting about 1500 everyday citizens as part of a new crowdsourcing model. Wake Forest Associate Psychology Professor Eric Stone says researchers hope to one day better predict political uprisings, terrorist attacks, and even World Cup Winners.

The economic impact of North Carolina's wine industry is now more than billion dollar-a-year.

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