Jeff Tiberii

Greensboro Bureau Chief

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to complete strangers at the age of 2. Following a meal at La Cantina Italiana, Jeff climbed down from the booth and began asking other customers what was going on. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Massachusetts, graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse) and WFDD (Winston-Salem) dates back almost 10 years. Jeff grew up rooting for the Tar Heels (Donald Williams, Dante Calabria) and remains an avid basketball fan. He also works for IMG College as a Network Studio Host in Winston-Salem.

Jeff has covered a Presidential Inauguration, three NCAA Tournaments, another three ACC Men’s Tournaments, the wreckage of a plane crash, and the John Edwards Trial. His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here & Now. Jeff’s work has been recognized with three regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, and dozens of other honors. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad. Jeff began as the Greensboro Bureau Chief in September of 2011.

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Environment
5:00 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Haw River Listed Among The Nation's Most Endangered Rivers

Haw River at Griffins Crossroads, NC
Credit Todd Martin / Flickr/Creative Commons

A national environmental group says the Haw River is among the most endangered in the nation. Earlier this year a pipe broke in Burlington and 3.5 million gallons of sewage spilled into the Haw. The River flows into Jordan Lake, which provides drinking water for about one million state residents.

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Environment
5:00 am
Tue April 8, 2014

'Astonishing:' State Appeals Requirement To Clean-Up Coal Ash

Credit Southern Environmental Law Center

A North Carolina environmental agency is appealing a recent ruling that called for immediate action to stop groundwater contamination, caused by coal ash.

A North Carolina environmental agency is appealing a recent ruling that called for immediate action to stop groundwater contamination, caused by coal ash.

The Environmental Management Commission (EMC) is a state regulatory panel. Its members are currently appointed by three republican lawmakers. Two years ago the EMC said it didn't have the authority to force Duke Energy to clean up the causes of groundwater contamination at 14 sites around the state. Environmentalists filed a lawsuit, claiming the EMC wasn't properly reading or enforcing the law. State judge Paul Ridgeway agreed with that take last month, telling the agency it had authority to mandate that Duke deal with contaminants.

Now, that same agency is appealing the judge's ruling. 

"So the state is now on the same side of this appeal as Duke Energy, defending Duke against our effort to enforce the law against them," said DJ Gerken, an attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center, who called this appeal astonishing. 

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Coal Ash
5:07 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Concerns Linger For N.C. Residents After Coal Ash Spill

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 1:04 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A federal criminal investigation is focusing on Duke Energy and a North Carolina state environmental agency. A couple of months ago, as you may recall, a storm water pipe ruptured and poured as much as 39,000 tons of potentially toxic carbon byproduct into the Dan River in North Carolina.

North Carolina Public Radio's Jeff Tiberii reports.

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Environment
8:32 pm
Mon March 31, 2014

Cleaning Coal Ash In Danville, VA

Duke Energy is scheduled to begin removing coal ash from the waters of Danville, VA today
Credit Steven Alexander / USFWS

Leaders of the Moral Monday movement will focus on coal ash during a town hall meeting in Eden. The moral Monday event consists of two panels of people who will discuss the health,

Leaders of the Moral Monday movement focused on coal ash during a town hall meeting in Eden. The 'Moral Monday' event consisted of two panels of people to discuss the health, environmental and economic impacts of the coal ash spill that originated in Eden, near the Virginia border almost two months ago. As much as 39,000 tons of potentially toxic ash poured into the Dan River when a metal pipe running through a Duke Energy coal ash dump, ruptured. The ash has been found as far as 70 miles downstream. Some of the ash at the spill site in Eden has been removed by the utility.

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Arts & Culture
2:14 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

How Lessons Learned From DPAC May Help Help The New Performing Arts Center In Greensboro

This rendering is of a proposed design for the performing arts center in Greensboro. The project is expected to break ground before the end of 2014.
Credit City of Greensboro

Plans for a new downtown performing arts center in Greensboro are moving forward. City officials and fundraisers finalized an agreement this month about construction and operation details for "The Steven B. Tanger Center For The Performing Arts". A ground-breaking could take place this fall. The building is expected to host Broadway shows and co-exist with a state-of-the-art venue just down the road, Durham's Performing Arts Center (DPAC.)

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Environment
5:35 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Following The Coal Ash News: DENR Abandons Proposed Settlement

The Dan River bank with residual dark grey coal ash.
Credit Steven Alexander / USFWS

Officials with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) have announced they are abandoning a proposed settlement with Duke Energy over the clean-up of coal ash.

Officials with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) have announced they are abandoning a proposed settlement with Duke Energy over the clean-up of coal ash. The proposed settlement would have levied Duke with a $99,000 fine, but had no requirement to remove or clean-up coal ash at two sites in the state. 

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The State of Things
5:00 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Today In Coal Ash: Federal Testimony And A Chatham County Investigation

A Duke Energy power plant and coal ash ponds outside Asheville, North Carolina.
Credit Zen Sutherland

Guest host Phoebe Judge talks with Jeff Tiberii, WUNC's Greensboro bureau chief about a Federal investigation of Duke Energy and DENR

  

A federal grand jury has been impaneled to hear evidence about the relationship between Duke Energy and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR). At the same time, that state agency is investigating the discharge of water by the utility at a site in Chatham County. Guest host Phoebe Judge talks with WUNC's Jeff Tiberii about the latest developments on The State of Things today.

First, the court proceedings:

The highly criticized relationship between Duke Energy and DENR is the focus of the federal investigation. The U.S. Attorney's office is demanding that Duke Energy and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources hand over records of wire transfers, receipts and any items of value that might have passed between the two.  Twenty current and former state employees have been called to testify before a grand jury about their relationship with Duke Energy. The company and state utility commission also received subpoenas. 

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Environment
6:21 pm
Fri March 14, 2014

Dispute Over Latest 'Action' From DENR

The Riverbend steam station along the Catawba River was retired in 2013.
Credit coalashchronicles.tumblr.com

On Friday the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) announced it plans to modify Duke Energy water permit. Those water permits are administered by the state and adhere to federal guidelines for discharge. DENR says it plans to change permits so that Duke would be required to remove all coal ash from unlined pits at two plants - one along Lake Catawba near Charlotte, the other outside of Asheville. The changes would also call for Duke to dewater and close coal ash ponds at Lake Sutton (outside of Wilmington).

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Environment
10:50 am
Fri March 14, 2014

DENR Calls Duke's Coal Ash Clean-Up Plan Inadequate

Taking core samples of coal ash spill.
Credit Sara Ward / USFWS

The CEO of Duke Energy sent a letter this week to Governor Pat McCrory and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) outlining the company's plans for coal ash clean-up in the state.

Duke says the letter is a big deal.

DENR described it as inadequate.

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Environment
5:00 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Democrats Want Coal Ash Removed

Credit Appalachian Voices / via Creative Commons/Flickr

A group of elected Democrats will detail their plans for the clean-up of coal ash Thursday afternoon in Raleigh. Democrat Pricey Harrison of Guilford County has introduced legislation a half dozen times to require the clean up of the potentially toxic coal ash at 14 Duke Energy-owned sites around the state. Her efforts have never advanced through the legislature.

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