Jeff Tiberii

Greensboro Bureau Chief

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to complete strangers at the age of 2. Following a meal at La Cantina Italiana, Jeff climbed down from the booth and began asking other customers what was going on. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Massachusetts, graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse) and WFDD (Winston-Salem) dates back almost 10 years. Jeff grew up rooting for the Tar Heels (Donald Williams, Dante Calabria) and remains an avid basketball fan. He also works for IMG College as a Network Studio Host in Winston-Salem.

Jeff has covered a Presidential Inauguration, three NCAA Tournaments, another three ACC Men’s Tournaments, the wreckage of a plane crash, and the John Edwards Trial. His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here & Now. Jeff’s work has been recognized with three regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, and dozens of other honors. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad. Jeff began as the Greensboro Bureau Chief in September of 2011.

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Politics & Government
5:01 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

The Race To Replace Coble: 'It's A Wonderful Chance For A Republican' Says One Analyst

It was a small audience at a forum for 6th Congressional candidates at UNC-Greensboro last week.
Credit Jeff Tiberi

Early voting for begins this Thursday and candidates for federal, state and local offices are making a final push leading up to the May 6th primary. In the 6th Congressional District a crowded field of conservative hopefuls is vying for the republican nomination.

Early voting for begins this Thursday and candidates for federal, state and local offices are making a final push leading up to the May 6th primary.

In the Republican leaning 6th Congressional District a crowded field of conservative hopefuls is vying for the republican nomination to replace 83-year-old Howard Coble, who is retiring later this year.

When Coble was first elected to the US Congress, North Carolina had about 60 percent fewer residents. That's about four million people. You could still smoke on planes. Michael Jordan was a rookie with the Chicago Bulls.

The long-time incumbent is stepping aside leaving a significant vacancy. 

"This is a wonderful chance, the seat is open - well it's a wonderful chance for a Republican at least. It's a good year for Republicans. If you get the nomination for your party you're going to be in Congress. And once you're in Congress there is a good chance you can stay there," said Charles Prysby is a Political Science Professor at UNC-Greensboro.

Meeting the public

Some of the men campaigning for the 6th Congressional seat were in an old lecture hall on campus at UNCG last week. At the start of the forum there were fewer than 20 people in the audience. The forum featured four Republicans and a Democrat,.

Students asked questions and the conversation flowed from education to climate change, the war on drugs to minimum wage and touched briefly on foreign policy.

"It's surprising that you don't have more what I would call high quality Republican candidates," Prysby said.

He says a common path to Congress is first working as a state legislator. None of the candidates in the 6th have any experience in the General Assembly. By comparison, three candidates in the race for the open 12th congressional seat are current state legislators.

"Experienced candidates, people who have had elected office. So this is not a reflection on the inherent quality of some of the people - they may be absolutely wonderfully people. But of the nine Republicans I think only three have held elected office," added Prysby. 

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Education
4:03 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

UNC: Report Discredits Willingham Findings

Credit Dave DeWitt

An independent review is discrediting the findings of a whistleblower at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Mary Willingham is an academic advisor at UNC-Chapel Hill who first blew the whistle on no-show classes two years ago. More recently she claimed that one-fourth of all Carolina athletes were reading at our below a fourth-grade level.

UNC-Chapel Hill officials disputed the methods she used in making that assertion. The school hired three professors at other institutions to review Willingham’s data.

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Environment
5:28 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Why Duke Energy Wanted To Add Chemicals To Trees, And Why They Won't

Trees in Chapel Hill, NC
Credit Laura Candler

Officials with Duke Energy have decided to hold off on a program that would have used a chemical product, Cambistat, to slow the growth of trees near power lines.

Officials with Duke Energy have decided to hold off on a program that would have used a chemical product, Cambistat, to slow the growth of trees near power lines. The utility planned to inject the application into the soil around trees.  The application would slow growth, reduce how often trees near power lines needed to be trimmed, and save money. But residents questioned the risks, and complained that they were being forced into the program. 

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Environment
5:00 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Haw River Listed Among The Nation's Most Endangered Rivers

Haw River at Griffins Crossroads, NC
Credit Todd Martin / Flickr/Creative Commons

A national environmental group says the Haw River is among the most endangered in the nation. Earlier this year a pipe broke in Burlington and 3.5 million gallons of sewage spilled into the Haw. The River flows into Jordan Lake, which provides drinking water for about one million state residents.

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Environment
5:00 am
Tue April 8, 2014

'Astonishing:' State Appeals Requirement To Clean-Up Coal Ash

Credit Southern Environmental Law Center

A North Carolina environmental agency is appealing a recent ruling that called for immediate action to stop groundwater contamination, caused by coal ash.

A North Carolina environmental agency is appealing a recent ruling that called for immediate action to stop groundwater contamination, caused by coal ash.

The Environmental Management Commission (EMC) is a state regulatory panel. Its members are currently appointed by three republican lawmakers. Two years ago the EMC said it didn't have the authority to force Duke Energy to clean up the causes of groundwater contamination at 14 sites around the state. Environmentalists filed a lawsuit, claiming the EMC wasn't properly reading or enforcing the law. State judge Paul Ridgeway agreed with that take last month, telling the agency it had authority to mandate that Duke deal with contaminants.

Now, that same agency is appealing the judge's ruling. 

"So the state is now on the same side of this appeal as Duke Energy, defending Duke against our effort to enforce the law against them," said DJ Gerken, an attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center, who called this appeal astonishing. 

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Coal Ash
5:07 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Concerns Linger For N.C. Residents After Coal Ash Spill

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 1:04 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A federal criminal investigation is focusing on Duke Energy and a North Carolina state environmental agency. A couple of months ago, as you may recall, a storm water pipe ruptured and poured as much as 39,000 tons of potentially toxic carbon byproduct into the Dan River in North Carolina.

North Carolina Public Radio's Jeff Tiberii reports.

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Environment
8:32 pm
Mon March 31, 2014

Cleaning Coal Ash In Danville, VA

Duke Energy is scheduled to begin removing coal ash from the waters of Danville, VA today
Credit Steven Alexander / USFWS

Leaders of the Moral Monday movement will focus on coal ash during a town hall meeting in Eden. The moral Monday event consists of two panels of people who will discuss the health,

Leaders of the Moral Monday movement focused on coal ash during a town hall meeting in Eden. The 'Moral Monday' event consisted of two panels of people to discuss the health, environmental and economic impacts of the coal ash spill that originated in Eden, near the Virginia border almost two months ago. As much as 39,000 tons of potentially toxic ash poured into the Dan River when a metal pipe running through a Duke Energy coal ash dump, ruptured. The ash has been found as far as 70 miles downstream. Some of the ash at the spill site in Eden has been removed by the utility.

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Arts & Culture
2:14 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

How Lessons Learned From DPAC May Help Help The New Performing Arts Center In Greensboro

This rendering is of a proposed design for the performing arts center in Greensboro. The project is expected to break ground before the end of 2014.
Credit City of Greensboro

Plans for a new downtown performing arts center in Greensboro are moving forward. City officials and fundraisers finalized an agreement this month about construction and operation details for "The Steven B. Tanger Center For The Performing Arts". A ground-breaking could take place this fall. The building is expected to host Broadway shows and co-exist with a state-of-the-art venue just down the road, Durham's Performing Arts Center (DPAC.)

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Environment
5:35 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Following The Coal Ash News: DENR Abandons Proposed Settlement

The Dan River bank with residual dark grey coal ash.
Credit Steven Alexander / USFWS

Officials with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) have announced they are abandoning a proposed settlement with Duke Energy over the clean-up of coal ash.

Officials with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) have announced they are abandoning a proposed settlement with Duke Energy over the clean-up of coal ash. The proposed settlement would have levied Duke with a $99,000 fine, but had no requirement to remove or clean-up coal ash at two sites in the state. 

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The State of Things
5:00 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Today In Coal Ash: Federal Testimony And A Chatham County Investigation

A Duke Energy power plant and coal ash ponds outside Asheville, North Carolina.
Credit Zen Sutherland

Guest host Phoebe Judge talks with Jeff Tiberii, WUNC's Greensboro bureau chief about a Federal investigation of Duke Energy and DENR

  

A federal grand jury has been impaneled to hear evidence about the relationship between Duke Energy and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR). At the same time, that state agency is investigating the discharge of water by the utility at a site in Chatham County. Guest host Phoebe Judge talks with WUNC's Jeff Tiberii about the latest developments on The State of Things today.

First, the court proceedings:

The highly criticized relationship between Duke Energy and DENR is the focus of the federal investigation. The U.S. Attorney's office is demanding that Duke Energy and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources hand over records of wire transfers, receipts and any items of value that might have passed between the two.  Twenty current and former state employees have been called to testify before a grand jury about their relationship with Duke Energy. The company and state utility commission also received subpoenas. 

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