Jeff Tiberii

Capitol Bureau Chief

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to strangers after dinner at La Cantina Italiana, in Massachusetts, when he was two-years-old. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Ma., an avid fan of the Boston Celtics, and took summer vacations to Acadia National Park (in Maine) with his family.  He graduated from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse), WFDD (Winston-Salem) and now  WUNC, dates back 12 years. 

He works in the Capitol Bureau in downtown Raleigh. Jeff started at WUNC as the Greensboro Bureau Chief, in September of 2011. He has reported on a range of topics, including higher education, the military, federal courts, politics, coal ash, aviation, craft beer, opiate addiction and college athletics.

His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here & Now. Jeff’s work has been recognized with four regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, and dozens of other honors. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad.

If you have a story, question or thought find him at or @J_tibs

Ways to Connect

Jeff Tiberii

The trial of former North Carolina Senator John Edwards is being delayed again. From Greensboro, Jeff Tiberii reports a serious medical condition is the cause.

More North Carolinians are carpooling to work. Jeff Tiberii has more.

Jeff Tiberii: Last year 27-hundred people signed up to be part of the states Share the Ride NC program. The Department of Transportation says there are now more than 31-thousand people who car pool to and from work.

Jennifer Garifo: A big advantage is just a relief on stress; especially people that are in urban areas, sitting by yourself in the car, stop and go traffic.

Winston-Salem Police say one man was drunk driving prior to a fatal car crash involving an elected official last month.

Frigid temperatures are affecting many across the state today.

Jeff Tiberii: Eric Murphy is a hot dog vendor in downtown Greensboro. He works in front of City Hall for five and a half hours each week day, serving dogs, chili, chips and drinks. During today’s lunch hour it was 31 degrees.

North Carolina Law Enforcement officials plan to crack down on methamphetamine labs in 2012. Jeff Tiberii has more.

Jeff Tiberii: Last year there were 331 illegal methamphetamine lab busts in North Carolina, an all-time high. The main ingredient in the drug is pseudoephedrine, which is found in Sudafed. Beginning this week all retailers will be hooked into a tracking system tracing pseudoephedrine purchases. North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper:

Pickles, possums and fleas will help bring in 2012 across rural North Carolina.

Jeff Tiberii: The city of Mount Olive expects more than 2,000 visitors for its 13th annual pickle drop tomorrow night. A thirty-pound wooden flea will drop in Eastover to commemorate the New Year. And in the Western reaches of the state a live possum will be lowered, not dropped, 18 feet inside of some Plexiglas. Clay Logan is the organizer of the alcohol-free, family-oriented event.

A state audit has found that the Department of Agriculture assessed only two fines following thousands of safety violations involving liquefied petroleum.

Liquefied Petroleum – or L.P. – gas is used in grills, lighters and even to heat homes. During a 12-month period, Department of Agriculture inspectors wrote nearly 7,500 safety violations, but levied just two fines. State Auditor Beth Wood says violations ranged from storage plants, to dangerous pipes in homes. She says inspectors should have assessed much more in penalties.

Laurence Lovette will serve the rest of his life behind bars for murdering UNC Chapel Hill student body president Eve Carson. On Tuesday Lovette became the second man convicted in the killing. District Attorney Jim Woodall says in the four years since the crime, the Carson case has received attention throughout the country.

Jim Woodall: "I've literally prosecuted thousands of cases. One thing that made this case different is that it was so senseless. And then that Eve had such a bright future. She meant so much to so many people."

One North Carolina hospital is using a new device to help patients who have congestive heart failure.

Wake Forest Baptist health is the first hospital in the state implanting the dual ventricular lead. In laymans terms it’s a more advanced pacemaker. The small device will help hearts pump more blood and with a better rhythm. Dr. Glenn Brammer is a Cardiac Electro Physiologist. He says this device also has 10 internal vectors that allow physicians options after the procedure. 

Occupy groups from the Triad are holding an employment march tomorrow.

Organizers expect about 200 people to participate in downtown Greensboro. Members of the occupy groups from Winston-Salem, Greensboro and High Point are joining together for the event. A rally will follow the march. Speakers from organized labor groups and worker owned cooperatives will address the crowd. John Kernodle is organizing the march:

Dean Jim Ryan gives a demonstration of the 3-D visualization room
Jeff Tiberii

Yesterday the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering in Greensboro cut the ribbon to its brand new 64 million dollar facility. Students from UNC-Greensboro and North Carolina A&T State University have been using temporary facilities for the past year. Now, they have state-of-the-art technology as they research everything from diseases to the components of a cell phone.

Abu, from Africa, smiles in the ''Giving Closet'' at the Newcomers School in Greensboro
Jeff Tiberii

The Doris Henderson Newcomers School in Greensboro is a melting pot. Since August of 2007 the school has welcomed about 3,000 students from around the world who are transitioning to a life in America while learning English. Seventy-five percent of the students are refugees and the challenges facing them are numerous.

With the winter approaching more beds are being made available to people who are homeless.

In recent weeks shelters in Greensboro have turned away a significant number of people seeking assistance. This week eight winter emergency, or 'WE' shelters are opening throughout the city. One new site is at the YWCA. It will serve up to 25 single women each night. Sharon Sumner is Director of the WE Shelters for the Greensboro Urban Ministries. She says this new shelter increases capacity where there is a growing demand.

North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper wants shoppers to be smart and safe this holiday season.

Cooper and the Better Business Bureau are asking consumers to do their homework this holiday season. They recommend looking into a charity before making a donation and shopping at familiar retailers.

Roy Cooper: "I would avoid a company that I don't know who I'm dealing with. There are so many options out there. Why deal with someone you don't know? You might be wanting to get a great deal, but if seems to good to be true it probably is."

Clean-up continues in Davidson county where two people died following a tornado on Wednesday.

At least 11 people were taken to the hospital following the severe storms. The National Weather Service confirmed that a tornado touched down near Lexington just after 6pm. Major Larry James is with Davidson County Emergency Services. He says the path of the tornado was tight, but caused some significant damage.

Larry James: Preliminary figures look like somewhere between 35 and 50 structures with some varying degree of damage.

High Point is home to a refurbished firearms facility.

Nearly two million dollars has been spent on improvements for the 20-year-old facility. Now, officers from around the state can use the centrally located center for practice and training. Kenneth Shultz is a Major with the High Point Police Department. He says among other improvements, upgrades include a classroom and a moving target system to help with reaction time.

Greensboro Aquatic Center
Jeff Tiberii

This weekend the Greensboro Aquatic Center hosts the first prominent event in its brief history. The facility is serving hundreds of local people each day while trying to also gain attention on the national swimming stage.

Voters in Greensboro have elected a new mayor.

Voters are casting ballots in local elections across the state today. Greensboro voters will pick a mayor and City Council.

Bloodhound Ellie Mae with her handler officer J.D. Fraser
Jeff Tiberii

About 20 bloodhounds from across the country are in the Triad this week working to earn certification. Dogs and their handlers are receiving training from the National Police Bloodhound Association. Greensboro K-9 officer J.D. Fraser works with four-legged partner Ellie Mae. She is trained to assist in missing person searches. Officer Fraser says the re-certification process hones Ellie Mae's skills and gives credibility to the practice.

Winston-Salem based BB&T is acquiring part of Florida’s BankAtlantic.

The bank will pay $300 million in exchange for nearly $5.5 billion in loans and deposits. The North Carolina company will not take on any loans at risk of default or bad assets in the merger. BB&T CFO Darryl Bible says the acquisition is ultimately safe.

Darryl Bible: "They separated the good bank form the bad bank. BB&T is acquiring all the good assets from BankAtlantic, about 2.1 billion dollars. BankAtlantic is basically retaining all the non performing assets."

A Veteran's clinic and several hundred jobs are likely heading to Kernersville.

A federal judge has denied motions to dismiss the case against former North Carolina Senator John Edwards.

WUNC welcomed a new Greensboro Bureau Chief this summer. Jeff Tiberii has worked in the Triad region of North Carolina since 2006. He joins host Frank Stasio with a review of the most-buzzed about headlines including the upcoming local elections in Greensboro and John Edwards’ appearance in federal court.

Former North Carolina Senator John Edwards sat through federal court hearings on Wednesday as his Lawyers tried to get an indictment against him dismissed.

Wearing a navy blue suit, red tie and wedding ring, the former two-time Presidential Candidate listened to a contentious hearing yesterday.