Isaac-Davy Aronson

Producer, "Morning Edition"

Isaac-Davy Aronson is WUNC's morning news producer and can frequently be heard on air as a host and reporter. He came to North Carolina in 2011, after several years as a host at New York Public Radio in New York City.  He's been a producer, newscaster and host at Air America Radio, New York Times Radio, and Newsweek on Air.

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Entrepreneurs, researchers, and the military are gathering in Chapel Hill today to discuss high-tech solutions to military problems.  The Federal Advanced Technologies Symposium is being hosted at UNC by Senator Richard Burr and the North Carolina Military Business Center, which works to secure military contracts in the state.

Tomorrow is primary day in North Carolina, again. In races in which no candidate received more than 40% of the vote in the May 8th primary, the top 2 vote-getters vie for their party's nomination in a runoff Tuesday. In addition to several U.S. House and General Assembly seats, there are run-offs for 5 statewide offices. Isaac-Davy Aronson has this look at the two candidates for the Republican nomination for Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Early voting ends Saturday in North Carolina's primary run-off elections. In races in which no candidate received more than 40% of the vote in the May 8th primary, the top 2 vote-getters face off on Tuesday for their party's nomination. In addition to several U.S. House and General Assembly seats, there are run-offs for 5 statewide offices. Isaac-Davy Aronson has this look at the two candidates for the Republican nomination for Secretary of State.

Family, colleagues, and state officials gathered Tuesday to honor the four North Carolina Air National Guard members killed while fighting a wildfire. The memorial service was held at the 145th Airlift Wing's base in Charlotte. Governor Bev Perdue hailed the men as heroes who gave their lives to protect others.

Bev Perdue: We celebrate their great love today for their spouses and their children, for their families and their friends, and for the communities they called home: Boone, Mooresville, Belmont, and Charlotte.

Early voting is underway in North Carolina's primary run-off elections. In races in which no candidate received more than 40% of the vote in the May 8th primary, the top 2 vote-getters face off on July 17th for their party's nomination. In addition to several U.S. House and General Assembly seats, there are run-offs for 5 statewide offices.

Early voting is underway in North Carolina's primary run-off elections. In races in which no candidate received more than 40% of the vote in the May 8th primary, the top 2 vote-getters face off on July 17th for their party's nomination. In addition to several U.S. House and General Assembly seats, there are run-offs for 5 statewide offices. Isaac-Davy Aronson has this look at the two candidates for the Republican nomination for Insurance Commissioner.

Early voting is underway in North Carolina's primary run-off elections. In races in which no candidate received more than 40% of the vote in the May 8th primary, the top 2 vote-getters face off on July 17th for their party's nomination. In addition to several U.S. House and General Assembly seats, there are run-offs for 5 statewide offices.

The Supreme Court's decision to uphold President Obama's healthcare overhaul sparked a range of reactions across North Carolina.

Tanner Latham: A rally to celebrate the Supreme Court's decision on Obama's healthcare law was held Thursday at Gaffney Health Services on Albemarle Road in East Charlotte.

Erika Braun
Erika Braun

The U.S. Olympic swimming trials are underway in Omaha, Nebraska, and several North Carolinians have already qualified for the Olympic team headed to London this summer. Among the competitors in the trials' final days will be Raleigh's Erika Braun. She's one of only four swimmers in the country age 40 or older to qualify for the trials.

Pew Center on the States
Pew Center

North Carolina is one of only four states to have funded its pension obligations over 95%. The latest report from the Pew Center on the States finds that most states are falling further behind in their contributions to public employee retirement funds.

A years-long project to coordinate heart attack care among North Carolina's hundreds of hospitals and emergency services has shortened response times and reduced the number of deaths.

That's according to a study out this week. One of its authors is Duke cardiologist James Jollis. He says one way the system reduced response times was by creating standard statewide practices for EMS workers.

Fayetteville's city council has approved new dog limits. Starting July 1st, people living in apartments will only be able to keep two dogs, and people living on less than a half acre will be limited to three. Cumberland County approved the same ordinance earlier this month. Three council members voted against the measure, saying the city should focus on problem dogs. But Cumberland County animal control director John Lauby says the new restrictions will make people safer.

The summertime travel season gets underway today. Officials at the State Department of Transportation are suspending most road works for the Memorial Day weekend. Tom Crosby works for AAA Carolinas. He says nearly a million drivers will be on North Carolina roads and highways this weekend, partly because gas prices have dropped from this time last year.

A ban goes into effect today on an industrial-scale method of fishing for menhaden off the North Carolina coast. The ban was approved earlier this month by the state Marine Fisheries Commission. Patricia Smith is with the state Division of Marine Fisheries.

A Raleigh man is getting a national honor for his work in the aftermath of last April's deadly tornadoes. Al Mignacci will receive the U.S. Small Business Administration's "Phoenix Award for Outstanding Contributions to Disaster Recovery by a Volunteer."

NC Division of Water Quality
NC Division of Water Quality

North Carolina environmental officials are formulating a strategy to reduce mercury levels in the state's waterways. The divisions of air and water quality are holding public meetings this week and next to share their findings and solicit ideas. Susan Massengale with the Division of Water Quality says they've just completed a study finding that 98% of the mercury in the state's water is coming from the air.

Graham Hughes
sas.com

Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina and Cary-based information technology giant SAS are collaborating to provide more personalized health care.

A training center opens in Raleigh this afternoon to highlight the latest uses for propane. North Carolina is the second largest user of the fuel behind California. John Jessup is the executive director of the North Carolina Propane Gas Association. He says propane burns cleaner and is cheaper than gasoline and diesel. He also says the natural gas boom is behind the boost in the propane supply.

The Army Corps of Engineers says it will begin dredging the Hatteras Inlet channel on Saturday, and not a moment too soon for ferry passengers. Service on the Hatteras-Ocracoke route has been suspended several times since the weekend. Lucy Wallace is with the North Carolina Ferry Division.

Senator Kay
Office of Senator Kay Hagan

Senator Kay Hagan toured UNC Children's Hospital yesterday as part of a push for her bill that would streamline approval of treatments for serious and rare diseases.

Hagan says the Food and Drug Administration needs to find faster ways to get treatments to patients suffering from rare diseases.

The Upside of Irrationality

Apr 27, 2012

We all do irrational things. Perhaps the strangest thing of all is convincing ourselves that we don’t. What if we embraced the irrationality of human decisions? Would we find that there are advantages to making illogical decisions?

Singer-songwriter Gigi Dover has been a staple of the music scene in North Carolina since the late 1980s when she performed with Americana band The Rank Outsiders.

The debate over a proposed constitutional amendment banning gay marriage and civil unions includes its potential economic impact.

With the May 8th vote less than two weeks away, the battle over a proposed constitutional amendment banning gay marriage and civil unions is heating up. For our series examining the arguments over the amendment, Isaac-Davy Aronson looks at one of the claims made by its opponents.

A proposed amendment to the state constitution banning gay marriage and civil unions has divided religious communities. For our series examining the arguments over the amendment, Isaac-Davy Aronson spoke to two North Carolina faith leaders.

Isaac-Davy Aronson: Michael Curry is the Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina. He opposes the amendment.

Michael Curry: This is coming out of my faith, as a Christian, as an Episcopal bishop, as an African American man, you don't do harm to people.

A proposed amendment to the North Carolina constitution would define marriage between one man and one woman as the only valid or recognized domestic legal union in the state. Opponents of the amendment claim its wording would put certain protections and benefits at risk for all unmarried couples and their children. Among them: child custody and visitation rights.

Opponents of a proposed amendment to the state constitution banning same-sex marriage and civil unions say the measure is written too broadly. Among the effects they claim it could have is the invalidation of domestic violence protections for unmarried couples. Amendment supporters call that a scare tactic.

A proposed amendment to the North Carolina constitution banning gay marriage and civil unions is just two sentences. But opponents of the measure say if voters approve it on May 8th, protections and benefits for unmarried couples and their children could be jeopardized. As part of our series examining the arguments over Amendment One, Isaac-Davy Aronson looks at whether a few words could change so much.

On May 8th, North Carolinians will vote on an amendment to the state constitution that would ban gay marriage and civil unions. Opponents of Amendment One claim the measure would have far-reaching consequences for gay and straight families alike. One claim is that some unmarried people and their children could lose health care coverage. Isaac-Davy Aronson reports for our series examining the arguments over Amendment One.

Hunting coyotes at night could soon be legal in some parts of the state. A proposed rule change by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission would allow the use of artificial lights to blind coyotes after dark. The move is prompted by concerns for livestock and pet safety as the animals' population increases. But David Rabon from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Red Wolf Recovery Program says the change could threaten the fragile Red Wolf population.

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