Isaac-Davy Aronson

Producer, "Morning Edition"

Isaac-Davy Aronson is WUNC's morning news producer and can frequently be heard on air as a host and reporter. He came to North Carolina in 2011, after several years as a host at New York Public Radio in New York City.  He's been a producer, newscaster and host at Air America Radio, New York Times Radio, and Newsweek on Air.

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Early voting is underway in North Carolina. Voters are electing a new governor and they're also making selections for other statewide offices.

On November 6th, North Carolina voters will elect a new governor. They'll also make selections for Council of State offices. 

The labor commissioner enforces workplace safety and other employment laws, and inspects equipment including elevators. Republican Cherie Berry is running for a fourth term in the office.

Cherie Berry: "We have the luxury this year of comparing records of commissioners of labor."

That's because her opponent, Democrat John C. Brooks, previously held the post for four terms.

On November 6th, North Carolina voters will elect a new governor. They're also making selections for Council of State offices. Isaac-Davy Aronson has this look at the two candidates for Lieutenant Governor.

On November 6th, North Carolina voters will elect a new governor. They'll also make selections for Council of State offices. Isaac-Davy Aronson has this look at the two candidates for Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Business leaders, state officials, and diplomats gathered last night to launch a new chapter of the British American Business Council. Steve Cain is the president of the new Triangle/Eastern North Carolina chapter. He says the region is very attractive for international investment.

Triad-based mattress giant Sealy is being acquired by rival Tempur-Pedic. The Lexington, Kentucky-based leader in foam mattresses will pay about $228 million in cash, and assume or pay back all of Sealy's outstanding debt. The merger would create the world's largest bedding company. Tempur-Pedic CEO Mark Sarvary says no major changes are expected in how either company is run.

An advocacy group says it plans to file a lawsuit against the UNC system, alleging inconsistent and unfair treatment of veterans. Jason Thigpen is president of Student Veterans Advocacy Group.

"The UNC school system across the board - universities and community colleges - have invariably misclassified many of these student veterans and family members as out-of-state residents, when they meet all the qualifications to be considered an in-state resident for tuition purposes," said Thigpen.

Blakely Cannon at NC Museum of History
NC Dept of Cultural Resources / http://www.ncdcr.gov

A cannon that saw service in Wilmington during the Civil War will now mark the plaza in front of the North Carolina Museum of History. The Raleigh museum is unveiling the artifact later this morning, adding to its exhibits marking the sesquicentennial of the conflict.

Child hunger is the target of a collaboration between Triangle-based farmers' markets and nonprofit Farmer Foodshare. Food and money will be collected this week at markets in Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Carrboro and elsewhere. Margaret Gifford is the founder and executive director of Farmer Foodshare. She says there's plenty of food to go around in North Carolina.

About 20 private wells in a Wake Forest neighborhood have been found to be contaminated with a toxic degreasing agent. Kenneth Rhame is a federal on-scene coordinator with the Environmental Protection Agency. He says one home off Stony Hill Road had concentrations of TCE more than 65 times the safe drinking limit.

Advocates are speaking out about a spike in domestic violence-related homicides in Wake County. There have been five alleged such killings in the last four months - one more than in all of last year. Organizers of a silent march in downtown Raleigh yesterday say about 75 people turned out to honor Agata Vellotti. Police say she was killed by her estranged husband 2 weeks ago. Another march will be held for Kathleen Bertrand, allegedly shot by her ex-husband at a Raleigh shopping center on Monday.

Raleigh is holding a day of volunteering and "doing good" to mark the 11th anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks. Isaac-Davy Aronson reports, the city is hoping it will become a new annual tradition.

The annual American Mortgage Conference gets underway today in Raleigh. Bankers, regulators, and government officials will meet for 3 days to discuss ways to get the mortgage market moving again. Thad Woodard is president and CEO of the North Carolina Bankers Association. He says the system now is much more strictly regulated under the Dodd-Frank financial reform act.

The economic downturn hit North Carolina harder than much of the country, and it will take the state longer to recover. That's the conclusion of a new report from UNC's Global Research Institute.

Grandfather Mountain Trees
Hugh Morton

With summer drawing to a close, thoughts turn to fall...and the tradition of leaf-peeping in Western North Carolina. While much of the country has been in drought, North Carolina has gotten plenty of rain in recent months...and that means the foliage this year could be particularly spectacular. Pamela McCown is coordinator for the Institute for Climate Education at A-B Tech in Asheville. She says rainfall is the most important factor in predicting a good year for fall foliage.

Tropical Storm Isaac may be far from North Carolina, but it could put a damper on Labor Day weekend travel plans in the Tar Heel state. Angela Daley is with AAA Carolinas. She says the storm has been disrupting oil production at Gulf Coast refineries.

Angela Daley says, "Gas prices had been going up all summer, but certainly in the past few days we've seen a huge spike of almost 10 cents in just a few days. So that's pretty significant, and we think a lot of last-minute travelers will choose not to travel this weekend."

NC Delegates Wrap Up Week In Tampa

Aug 31, 2012

North Carolina's delegates to the Republican National Convention are headed home, after their big week in Tampa. Delegate John Steward from Union County joined thousands of fellow party members at Mitt Romney's nomination acceptance speech last night. He says he likes that Romney is not backing away from cutting federal spending.

John Steward says, "I really liked the fact they're not backing off the Medicaid and Medicare - the only way to save it is to reform it and they're not backing off of that."

In Tampa, Republicans are eagerly awaiting Mitt Romney's big speech tonight. Attendees at the Republican National Convention were enthused by Vice Presidential nominee Paul Ryan's speech last night and North Carolina's delegates were no exception. Helen Eckman from Beaufort County says she likes Ryan's promise that if he and Mitt Romney are elected, they'll limit federal spending.  She wants Romney to adopt much of the budget Ryan proposed in the U.S. House.

Doctors and nurses from Duke University are training medical professionals in Rwanda, and helping the African nation build a sustainable health care system. Duke is among several American academic institutions participating in the U.S.-government-funded program.

Catherine Gilliss is Dean of Duke's Nursing School. She says the objective is to train nurses in Rwanda to deliver more sophisticated care.

One year ago Hurricane Irene made landfall near Cape Lookout. The Category 1 storm was slow moving and lingered along the North Carolina coast, killing seven people and causing $1.2 billion in damage. Julia Jerema works for North Carolina Emergency Management. She says recovery efforts are not quite complete.

The town of Chapel Hill will appeal a judge's rulings that struck down new towing and cell phone ordinances.

A North Carolina Yellow Pages publisher is continuing its transition into digital marketing through a merger with a Texas rival. Cary-based Dex One and Dallas-based SuperMedia have both emerged from bankruptcy in recent years, as the market has moved from print phone books to the Internet.

SuperMedia chief Peter McDonald says the marketing needs of small businesses today go far beyond an ad in the Yellow Pages.

The Appalachian Trail turns 75 this week. The nearly 2,200-mile route runs from Georgia to Maine.

Steve Paradis is the Chief Operating Officer of the Appalachian Trail Conservancy. He says the trail serves much the same purpose today as it did when it was completed in 1937.

Steve Paradis: It was proposed as a footpath that would connect small working communities and provide an opportunity for people to essentially escape the, if you will, the rat race along the east coast and to rejuvenate their spirit and refresh their souls.

North Carolina is hoping to find better uses for discarded food. A new study from the Department of Environment and Natural Resources finds that residents and businesses generate over a million tons of food waste a year. Scott Mouw is director of the state recycling program.

Scott Mouw: We now should turn our attention to diverting that material from landfills and to other kinds of uses, whether it's using the food for donation to food banks, or to composting, or to other uses that may eventually turn into energy like in anaerobic digestion.

More than 150 Parent Teacher Association leaders from across the country have gathered at the White House. They're being recognized for their work, and getting the chance to hear from and question federal education officials. Debra Saunders-White, a former vice chancellor at UNC-Wilmington, is with the Department of Education's Office of Post-secondary Education. Speaking at today's event, she stressed the importance of Pell grants.

A conference on North Carolina shale is underway in Raleigh. Scientists, government officials, environmentalists, and industry representatives will consider the potential and pitfalls of natural gas drilling in the state.

North Carolina's top apple-producing county is experiencing its worst crop in decades. That's according to growers and agriculture officials who say this year's unusual weather has devastated many of Henderson County's orchards.

Adam Pryor is a farmer and President of the Blue Ridge Apple Growers Association. He says the crop was hit hard in April by an overnight frost, after unusually warm weather had caused the trees to start blooming.

A sergeant accused of hazing a private who then committed suicide goes on trial today at Fort Bragg. Sergeant Adam Holcomb of Youngstown, Ohio, is one of eight soldiers charged in the death of 19-year-old Private Danny Chen, of New York. Military officials say Chen shot himself last year in Afghanistan after weeks of physical and emotional abuse. He was allegedly targeted because he was Chinese-American.

Coming soon to a restaurant near you: a rare hamburger. New food safety rules will free up many establishments to serve undercooked meat as long as they provide a written warning of the risks on the menu or elsewhere. It's part of federal food guidelines adopted by North Carolina last week, and being implemented statewide September 1st.

Larry Michael is head of the food protection program with the state Division of Public Health. He says the rules are about more than just a rare burger.

A concerted effort by the military is reducing the number of homicides of young children by parents or caregivers. That's the finding of a report from Action for Children North Carolina. Tom Vitaglione is a senior fellow with the organization.

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