Hady Mawajdeh

Producer, "The State of Things"

Hady Mawajdeh is a native Texan, born and raised in San Antonio. He listened to Fresh Air growing up and fell in love with public radio. He earned his B.A. in Mass Communication at Texas State University and specialized in electronic media. He worked at NPR affiliate stations KUT and KUTX in Austin, Texas as an intern, producer, social media coordinator, and a late-night deejay.
 
Hady joined the team at The State of Things in 2014 as a producer. Though he is new to North Carolina, he is already a fan of the Durham Bulls and the newly-reformed Charlotte Hornets. In his spare time, Hady enjoys playing pick-up basketball, reading, seeing live music, and listening to a variety of podcasts.
 

Ways to Connect

close-up shot from an exhibit panel
museumofdurhamhistory.org

In recalling history, many cite the leaders who shaped the politics and business of the country, cities and communities. But what about the folks that created small businesses, tilled the farms or raised children?

An exhibit at the Durham History Hub examines the not-so-known names in Durham’s history like Richard Fitzgerald, brickmaker and president of the Mechanics and Farmers Bank.

The Silent Killer

Jun 2, 2015
Photo of The Duke Cancer Center
www.dukemedicine.org

African-American men are nearly two times more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer than their white counterparts. And the gap in life-saving treatment is worse; African-American men are nearly three times more likely to die from prostate cancer than white men.

  According to the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry, for every 100,000 African-American men in the state, 216 will develop prostate cancer, and 48 will die.

Book cover to 'The Cold Dish' which was the first instalment of the Longmire Mystery Series.
craigallenjohnson.com

Walt Longmire is a fictional Wyoming county sheriff who returns to work after his wife's death. Assisted by his friends and his daughter, Longmire investigates major crimes within his jurisdiction while campaigning for re-election.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Longmire creator Craig Johnson about the Longmire Mystery Series and about the books becoming a popular television show on A&E and now Netflix. Johnson reads Saturday at 11 a.m. at McIntyre’s Books in Pittsboro and Sunday at 3 p.m. at Quail Ridge Books in Raleigh.

Two white gold rings. (flickr.com/photos/72236935@N00)
Jeff Belmonte / Flickr

The leaders of the country's largest Protestant denomination have a message for millennials: get married already!

Over the past year, Southern Baptist leaders have encouraged churchgoers to get married young. The push comes in an effort to ensure more couples will be virgins on their wedding day. But does marrying young lead to happier marriages?

Flier for Audio Under the Stars Homecoming show on May 29 at the Center for Documentary Studies.
Jenn Hales

  

Home is defined in many ways. Whether it is a source of pride, embarrassment, love, or hate, it is fundamental to many people’s identities.

Lives are full of stories from home and local audiophiles share those stories at a community listening party in Durham called Audio Under The Stars.

pugetsound.va.gov/

Combat veterans often struggle at the end of life with feelings of guilt, abandonment and regret. For some dying service members and their families, a military hospital is a place where they can make those last days meaningful.

Host Frank Stasio talks with KUOW reporter Patricia Murphy about end of life care for our nation’s soldiers.

In many cities, the crumbling housing projects that once housed the nation's poorest families are being replaced by mixed- income housing developments.

The US Department of Housing and Urban Development has made mixed-income housing the preferred model for providing affordable housing. The concept is to deconcentrate individuals who earn lower incomes and to assist those families in maintaining a residence in a community that serves various income levels. A recent study examines the effects of low-income children living alongside more affluent neighbors.

Jim Grimsley was an 11-year-old boy growing up in Jones County, North Carolina, when the first black children enrolled in his all-white school.

It was more than 10 years after Brown v. Board of Education and Grimsley’s whole world was about to change. Grimsley gets into this in his new memoir, in which he describes the racist environment in which he was raised and how he began to rethink his assumptions.

An image of a police officer speaking
Charlie Shelton / WUNC

How much will it cost? When would it be recording? Who could access the videos? These are a few questions that have surrounded the public forums about body cameras hosted by the Durham Police Department. But Tuesday evening's forum prompted a different question:

What will it change?

The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, is a history of science and medical efforts to understand the heart.
Little, Brown & Co/2015

Biologist, writer and professor Rob Dunn was not always going to be a scientist, but he was probably born to be one. 

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