Frank Stasio

Host, "The State of Things"

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.

From there he went to National Public Radio, where he rose from associate producer to newscaster for All Things Considered. He left that job in 1990 to help start an alternative school in Washington, DC. Frank returned to NPR as a freelance news anchor, guest host of Talk of The Nation and other national programs, and host of special news coverage.

He also presents audio theater workshops for children and teachers and conducts radio journalism workshops for broadcasters in former Soviet-bloc countries. He lives in Durham.

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State of Things
1:58 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Meet Gary Kueber

www.scientificproperties.com

Gary Kueber went to medical school and became a doctor in Durham, but being an M.D. wasn’t enough for him. He also had a passion for architecture and turned it into his blog, Endangered Durham. He has chronicled the destruction and preservation of Durham’s historic landmarks for years.

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State of Things
11:19 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Shana Tucker

(shanatucker.com

Classically trained cellist-turned jazz vocalist Shana Tucker has been leading a double life this year. She’s been traveling back and forth between Nevada and North Carolina. In Las Vegas, she’s a part of the musical cast of the Cirque du Soliel show “Ka,” but Durham is still home for Tucker and this weekend, she’s back for a special concert where she’ll film scenes for a new music video. Tucker joins host Frank Stasio to perform live and talk about the bi-coastal life plus her new music projects.

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State of Things
11:02 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Winston's Foxy Woman

Pam Grier (facebook.com)

Before the 1970s, opportunities for Black women in film were limited. African-American actresses were often relegated to roles as “mammies” or “tragic mulattos.”

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State of Things
8:57 am
Fri September 28, 2012

The Spook Who Infiltrated Hollywood

Sam Greenlee's

Writer Sam Greenlee’s controversial 1969 novel “The Spook Who Sat by the Door” told the story of Freeman, an African-American man with CIA training, a militant spirit and a seething anger at America’s racial and social injustices. The book became a cult favorite and later a film.

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State of Things
10:37 am
Thu September 27, 2012

Enlightened Choices

Kim Wade-Benzoni (www.fuqua.duke.edu/)

As adults, we are expected to behave maturely, but scientists find that often the reverse is true. People prefer their own gain over that of others and prefer instant gratification instead of delayed reward. However, a new study shows that with the right prompting, people can be led to forgo their selfish desires in favor of leaving an altruistic legacy.

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State of Things
10:23 am
Thu September 27, 2012

Los Restos de la Revolución

Kevin Kunishi's

In 1979, a socialist movement in Nicaragua led by a group called the Sandinistas overthrew dictator Anastasio Somoza. They set about creating a socialist government for Nicaragua, but during the Cold War era, the U.S. intervened and the CIA supplied and trained a counter-insurgency called the Contras. What proceeded was a decade-long civil war.

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State of Things
10:15 am
Thu September 27, 2012

Silent Spring Turns 50

Rachel Carson's

Fifty years ago, the book "Silent Spring" launched the environmental movement and changed the way we think about man-made chemicals. Its impact has been long lasting and the writing of author Rachel Carson still influences people to this day. Host Frank Stasio talks about Carson and the legacy of "Silent Spring" with Linda Lear, biographer, historian and author of "Rachel Carson: Witness for Nature" (Holt/1998).

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State of Things
11:34 am
Wed September 26, 2012

Storytelling Festival

Donald Davis, professional storyteller

In the age of digital technology, storytelling is alive and well. In fact, many professional storytellers travel, working the festival circuit. Donald Davis is on the road 42 weekends this year, entertaining audiences with tales about identity, spirituality and everyday life.

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State of Things
10:59 am
Wed September 26, 2012

Wage Theft

Kim Bobo's

Wage theft has been called "America's silent crime wave." It’s when businesses steal from their employees through a variety of unconscionable methods. Twenty-six percent of low wage workers don't get paid the minimum wage they are entitled to by law. Seventy-six percent of the country's work force doesn't get paid for the over time they work.

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State of Things
11:50 am
Tue September 25, 2012

National Day of Remembrance for Murder Victims

More than 85 people were murdered in the Triangle and Triad regions of North Carolina last year.  You may have heard about the crimes in the news, but you probably don’t know much more than that. The National Organization of Parents of Murdered Children aims to raise awareness about these losses of life.

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