Frank Stasio

Host, "The State of Things"

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.

From there he went to National Public Radio, where he rose from associate producer to newscaster for All Things Considered. He left that job in 1990 to help start an alternative school in Washington, DC. Frank returned to NPR as a freelance news anchor, guest host of Talk of The Nation and other national programs, and host of special news coverage.

He also presents audio theater workshops for children and teachers and conducts radio journalism workshops for broadcasters in former Soviet-bloc countries. He lives in Durham.

Mayor Alice Butler points to a map hanging in Roseboro Town Hall.
Patrick Nichols

Second to Pennsylvania, North Carolina has the most small towns in the United States. And it has been able to remain the so-called “small town state” because of the many miles of state highways connecting dispersed towns to one another.

photo of airport security lines
Kitt Hodsden / Wikimedia Commons

Memorial Day weekend is a peak travel time. And with more than two million travelers in TSA security lines over the holiday weekend, flying was as hassle-filled as driving.

Members of Congress have called for TSA reforms and the administration removed a top official last week. Are the changes enough to shorten the lines and keep the skies safe?

Host Frank Stasio talks with Time Warner Cable senior Washington reporter Geoff Bennett about the TSA challenges.

photo of Matthew Quick
Benj Lipchak

As an English teacher, Matthew Quick reveled in placing the right book with the right student.

He is now a best-selling novelist and explores the power of a good book in his latest work, Every Exquisite Thing (Little, Brown and Company/2016). The novel features the story of an unassuming high school girl who chooses to rebel against her prescribed well-to-do lifestyle after she reads an inspiring book.

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

High profile leaders from both sides of the political aisle try to move the state towards compromise on House Bill 2.

And at the capitol, lawmakers continue to negotiate details of the state budget. In particular, the two chambers do not have common ground on the amount and distribution of teacher pay.

And on the national stage, Trump says he officially has the delegates for the GOP nomination, and buzz continues about possible vice presidential selections.

Host Frank Stasio talks with political junkie Ken Rudin about the latest.

Leon Capetanos

As a kid growing up in Raleigh Leon Capetanos never imagined that he’d spend most of his life out West. He was an aspiring poet and studied writing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After participating in a talent program in Hollywood, he got a call from Universal Studios to join their writing department, and his career took off from there.

photo of Lincoln Durham
Robyn Von Swank

Lincoln Durham is not afraid to reveal his demons.

In his latest album, Revelations of a Mind Unraveling, Durham delivers dark and gritty punk-blues. As a one-man band, Durham arms himself with salvaged vintage instruments like cigar-box guitars and banjos to create his Southern Gothic sound.

The Last Good Girl

May 26, 2016
photo of "The Last Good Girl" by Allison Leotta
Allison Leotta

The statistics about campus sexual assault are staggering: one in five women is assaulted during her time on campus, and the vast majority of these assaults go unreported.

Advocates and survivors across the country have pushed to bring the issue to the forefront, and in the past few years, there has been increased attention paid to how universities are responding to students' needs.

photo of "Ordinary People," by Min Zaw
Courtesy of Ian Holliday

For most of the past 50 years, Myanmar has been under a military dictatorship and subsequently cut off from the western world. But the country is now in a time of transition after democratic elections last year.

Still From documentary
Erin Derham

Julian Price was born into money but spent most of his life giving it away.

A new documentary looks closely at how his social and entrepreneurial vision shaped downtown Asheville.

photo of a spread at Grady's Barbecue in Dudley, N.C.
Rien Fertel

North Carolina is the number two producer of pigs in America, and barbeque is by most accounts the state’s food. But historian Rien Fertel argues that most barbecue writing is hyperbole. 

In his new book “The One True Barbecue: Fire, Smoke, and the Pitmasters Who Cook The Whole Hog,” (Touchstone/2016) he examines the history of the southern barbecue art, and the wide range of mythology surrounding the meat and those who tend to it.

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