Frank Stasio

Host, "The State of Things"

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.

From there he went to National Public Radio, where he rose from associate producer to newscaster for All Things Considered. He left that job in 1990 to help start an alternative school in Washington, DC. Frank returned to NPR as a freelance news anchor, guest host of Talk of The Nation and other national programs, and host of special news coverage.

He also presents audio theater workshops for children and teachers and conducts radio journalism workshops for broadcasters in former Soviet-bloc countries. He lives in Durham.

Ways To Connect

Mayorga-Gallo's book explores the benefits of living in a racially diverse Durham neighborhood.
UNC Press

Researchers concluded long ago that segregated schools and neighborhoods were linked to racial inequality. “Separate, but equal” is a fallacy.

But Sarah Mayorga-Gallo wanted to find out if the converse is true. Is there a link between diverse neighborhoods and more racial equality?

She tried to answer that question by studying a racially diverse community in Durham. 

Her research is compiled in a book called Behind the White Picket Fence: Power and Privilege in a Multiethnic Neighborhood (UNC Press/2014).

Photo from the first U.S. nuclear field exercise on land on Nov. 1, 1951.
Federal Government of the United States / Wikimedia Commons

    

It has been nearly 50 years since the U.S. and the Soviet Union first sat down to talk about limiting their arsenals of nuclear weapons. 

Today, Russia and the U.S. have reduced their stockpiles, but they still have nearly 2,000 warheads each and several other countries have shown interest in creating or expanding their nuclear arsenal. 

So how do we gauge the threat of a nuclear conflict? What would nuclear war look like if it were limited to one region of the world?

From Nest To Sea And Back Again

Feb 27, 2015
Loggerhead sea turtle
US Fish and Wildlife Service

  

Researchers at UNC-Chapel Hill may have proof that sea turtles use the magnetic field of the earth to find their way back to their nesting places after traveling hundreds of miles at sea during adulthood.

Scientists have long suspected sea turtles use their sensitivity to magnetism to locate their hatching sites, but tracking them over long distances and time spans made the theory difficult to prove.

Host Frank Stasio talks with J. Roger Brothers, PhD candidate at UNC-Chapel Hill and lead author of the latest study on sea turtle navigation.

Carolina Academic Press

  

The U.S. justice system is meant to protect Americans from wrongdoing and hold accountable those who would harm others.

But advocates for reform point to incidents like the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner as just a few examples of a broken system.

Peacemaking criminologist Michael DeValve says love can rebuild it, arguing that where equality fails, empathy and compassion can succeed.

Michael Traister / Six String Drag

North Carolina musician Kenny Roby teamed up with his friend and bass player Rob Keller in the early 1990s to create a roots band called Six String Drag.

The alternative country-soul-rock music thrust Kenny, Rob and the rest of the band into their own careers, but now they are back together, and they have created their first album in 18 years, called Roots Rock 'N' Roll.

They returned to their eclectic style with a few images of the 1950s and 1960s thrown in, including a song called "I Miss the Drive-in."

multiple choice test
Alberto G. / flickr

    

College athletics programs are under a lot of pressure to make money for their schools. That means, among other things, keeping players academically eligible.

The scandal at UNC-Chapel Hill is one example. An investigator there found that over the course of 18 years, nearly 3,000 students took classes that did not require them to show up. About half were student athletes, and the report pointed the blame at a few administrators.

The Biltmore Company

Biltmore House is bringing Downton Abbey to Asheville with a new exhibit featuring more than 40 original costumes from the show.“Dressing Downton: Changing Fashion for Changing Times” traces the evolution of fashion and social norms during the early 20th century and draws a number of parallels between

Sarita and her family arrived from Nepal in 2008, where they had lived in a refugee camp for many years after fleeing political instability in Bhutan.
Andrea Patiño Contreras

The economy can have a major influence on the history of a city.

Factories once brought folks from the world over to new places with a similar goals in mind - to prosper and make a better life. That is the story of Lynn, Massachusetts. Once the home of General Electric and the countless shoe factories, the city was home to immigrants from Canada, Ireland, Greece, Italy and Armenia. Now, Lynn bears only the vestiges of its industrial success and is economically depressed. Immigration continues but from new areas of the world.

Laura Wagner/ The Radio Haiti Archive

Radio Haiti was the first independent Haitian radio station and the first public media platform to broadcast largely in Creole. Under the leadership of journalists Jean Dominique and Michele Montas, the station spent decades covering the social, cultural and political stories often ignored by most other Haitian media. Radio Haiti was shut down by the government a number of times and was under constant government pressure while it was on the air.

Photo by Barcelona-based photographer Violeta de Lama, courtesy of Wil Weldon.

More and more people around the world are choosing to get their hands dirty—digging in the dirt in their backyard or at a community garden to plant produce.

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