Frank Stasio

Host, "The State of Things"

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.

From there he went to National Public Radio, where he rose from associate producer to newscaster for All Things Considered. He left that job in 1990 to help start an alternative school in Washington, DC. Frank returned to NPR as a freelance news anchor, guest host of Talk of The Nation and other national programs, and host of special news coverage.

He also presents audio theater workshops for children and teachers and conducts radio journalism workshops for broadcasters in former Soviet-bloc countries. He lives in Durham.

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The State of Things
11:37 am
Tue February 22, 2011

Radio Shangri-La

Book Cover - Radio Shangri-La

Journalist Lisa Napoli was burned out. Then she met a handsome stranger at a party who pointed her in the direction of Bhutan, the tiny Himalayan hamlet famous for being remote and blissful.

Journalist Lisa Napoli was burnt out. She was tired of living in Los Angeles, tired of working the overnight shift for Marketplace Radio and tired of feeling like she didn't have enough of what she wanted in life. Then she met a handsome stranger at a party who pointed her in the direction of Bhutan, the tiny Himalayan hamlet famous for being remote and blissful. There, success is measured, not in Gross National Product, but in Gross National Happiness. Napoli arrived in Bhutan to help set up the first non-government owned radio station when the king peacefully abdicated the throne and the country transitioned into a constitutional monarchy. Her new book, "Radio Shangri-La" (Crown/2011) documents her journey to Bhutan and happiness, Bhutan's journey to democracy and the journey of a friend who left Bhutan for America only to find out that happiness was back at home. Napoli joins host Frank Stasio to talk about her travels and being a reporter in a place with no bad news.

The State of Things
9:35 am
Mon February 21, 2011

Meet Ping Fu

www.geomagic.com

Growing up in China, Ping Fu watched soldiers murder two of her teachers, lost her parents to reeducation camps and suffered rape. Today she's the CEO of Geomagic, a 3-D software company based in North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park.

Growing up in China, Ping Fu watched soldiers murder two of her teachers, lost her parents to re-education camps and suffered rape for trying to rescue her sister from drowning. She survived her childhood only to be imprisoned during college for her research into China's history of infanticide. She was deported and made her way to the United States where she became the creator and CEO of Geomagic, a 3-D software company based in North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park. Fu's technology is used by NASA, NASCAR and many others. 

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The State of Things
10:39 am
Fri February 18, 2011

The Murphey School Radio Show

The Murphey School Radio Show

Host Frank Stasio talks with Miller about the school’s legacy and reincarnation and Cartwright plays live in our studio.

The 1920s-era Murphey School in Orange County sat abandoned for years until Jay Miller, a philanthropist with a soft spot for historic properties, bought it and restored it. Now the school serves as an incubator space for small nonprofits associated with Miller’sShared Visions Project, while the auditorium serves as a community performance space. On Saturday night, Triangle area musicians and writers will gather to perform an old-time radio variety show in the school’s auditorium to raise money for local organizations. Among those participating will be accordion player Jay Cartwright.

The State of Things
10:20 am
Fri February 18, 2011

NC Literary Lights: A.R. Ammons

A.R. Ammons

As part of the occasional series, “North Carolina Literary Lights,” host Frank Stasio examines the life and work of A.R. Ammons with Alex Albright and Roger Gilbert.

Archie Randolph Ammons, known as "A.R." to his legions of devoted readers, was an award-winning poet who would have celebrated his 85th birthday today. He was born in Whiteville, North Carolina to a large family who farmed for their subsistence, sang in church and took in oddballs and strays. Ammons went on to serve in the Navy, attend Wake Forest University, and teach elementary school before joining the faculty of Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. As a poet, he was honored for his work with two National Book Awards, a Library of Congress Prize for Poetry, a Frost Medal and a fellowship from the Guggenheim Foundation, among many other prizes.

His poetic journey is actually many journeys from poems about rural North Carolina life to poems about science and engineering. And his story is actually many stories, from his early days on the farm to his later days in the rarefied world of poetic distinction.

As part of the occasional series, “North Carolina Literary Lights,” host Frank Stasio examines the life and work of A.R. Ammons with Alex Albright, a poet and an associate professor of English and Creative Writing at East Carolina University and the editor of several volumes of poetry including "The North Carolina Poems" by A.R. Ammons (Broadstone Press/2010). Also joining the conversation is Roger Gilbert, a professor of English at Cornell University who is currently working on a critical biography of Ammons.

The State of Things
10:44 am
Thu February 17, 2011

Deaver, Jeffery Deaver

Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver

Frank Stasio talks to Deaver about his plans for the suave spy.

Writer Ian Fleming created a British secret agent named James Bond in 1952. The character became a cultural phenomenon that continues to kill bad guys and bed beautiful women in books and on-screen. Chapel Hill resident Jeffery Deaver is the latest writer to take up the saga of “007.” His first Bond book, "Carte Blanche", is due out in the United States this summer. Frank Stasio will talk to Deaver about his plans for the suave spy.

The State of Things
10:35 am
Thu February 17, 2011

Deadly Spin

Deadly Spin by Wendell Potter

Potter joins host Frank Stasio to talk about health reform and being a health insurance industry whistleblower.

Wendell Potter, former head of corporate communications for Humana and CIGNA, two major health insurers, has testified before Congress that the insurance business model fails most consumers. Potter is the author of a new book, “Deadly Spin: An Insurance Company Insider Speaks Out on How Corporate PR Is Killing Health Care and Deceiving Americans”. He joins host Frank Stasio to talk about health reform and being a health insurance industry whistleblower.

The State of Things
10:22 am
Thu February 17, 2011

The Game Of Her Life

Phiona Mutesi

Tim Crothers joins host Frank Stasio to talk about how chess is changing Mutesi’s life.

Of the 600 million people who know how to play chess worldwide, Phiona Mutesi is one of the best. The 14-year-old Ugandan phenom recently competed in the Chess Olympiad, an international tournament that pits players against each other in strategic competition. A short time ago, Mutesi had never even heard of the game.

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The State of Things
11:34 am
Wed February 16, 2011

Egypt After The Uprising

Credit Chris Hondros - http://www.bagnewsnotes.com

As we wonder what will happen in the wake of the 30-year Mubarak regime, host Frank Stasio talks with experts, expatriates and observers about the possibilities.

Last week's toppling of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak has drawn the attentions of the world to the unrest in the Middle East. As we wonder what will happen in the wake of the 30-year Mubarak regime, host Frank Stasio talks with experts, expatriates and observers about the possibilities.

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The State of Things
11:15 am
Wed February 16, 2011

Public Understanding Of Science

When it comes to science, the public doesn't know what to think. Andrew Binder, a researcher at North Carolina State University, conducted a study on public opinion surveys of science. He found that people may say that a field of science, like nanotechnology, is too risky, but when asked specifics, their attitudes are often more favorable than they first appeared.

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The State of Things
10:26 am
Tue February 15, 2011

Listening To The Pictures

Credit Jimmy Williams

Host Frank Stasio talks with Jimmy Williams about how photographing blues musicians helps him see the world in a different way, and with Chris Williams about how the posters he creates for rock bands and events help reach listeners via their eyes.

The works of printmaker Chris Williams and photographerJimmy Williams offer two disparate examples of how music permeates visual art. Both artists are featured in a new exhibit called "Listenings," sponsored by the City of Raleigh Arts Commission. Host Frank Stasio talks with Jimmy Williams about how photographing blues musicians helps him see the world in a different way, and with Chris Williams about how the posters he creates for rock bands and events help reach listeners via their eyes.

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