Frank Stasio

Host, "The State of Things"

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.

From there he went to National Public Radio, where he rose from associate producer to newscaster for All Things Considered. He left that job in 1990 to help start an alternative school in Washington, DC. Frank returned to NPR as a freelance news anchor, guest host of Talk of The Nation and other national programs, and host of special news coverage.

He also presents audio theater workshops for children and teachers and conducts radio journalism workshops for broadcasters in former Soviet-bloc countries. He lives in Durham.

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State of Things
9:53 am
Fri March 2, 2012

Ghosts of the Old North State

Ghosts of the Old North State
Credit http://www.ipass.net/jhart/

Jeff Hart fell in love with ghost stories when he was in first grade, and he has never stopped thinking about them. There were the Brown Mountain Lights – strange lights at Brown Mountain in North Carolina that moved mysteriously up and down the mountain. And there was Lydia, the young girl whose ghost haunted the road where she died in a car accident. As an adult, Jeff became a musician, but he remembered his love for scary stories, and now he hearkens back to the tales of his youth with his new album, “Ghosts of the Old North State.”

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State of Things
11:49 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Remembering Howard Morgen

Howard Morgen

Howard Morgen was a guitarist, an arranger and a beloved teacher. Among his students were Paul Simon, Edie Brickell, Christine Lavin and Carly Simon. He wrote regular columns for several music magazines and taught at the Guitar Study Center of the New School in Manhattan and the Jazz Studies Program at C.W.Post Campus, Long Island University. He retired to Chapel Hill from New York in 2002 and earlier this month, after a long and valiant struggle with leukemia, Morgen died at the age of 79.

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State of Things
11:46 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Greenpeace Versus Duke Energy

Greenpeace, the national environmental organization, has set it sights on North Carolina's own Duke Energy. A number of protesters were arrested in separate incidents last month targeting Duke Energy for its rate hikes, a prospective merger with Progress Energy and its reliance on traditional fuels like coal and nuclear power.

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State of Things
11:37 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Textiles of Exiles

AIDS mapula South Africa c. 1990s

For oppressed people forced to flee their native lands, textiles are often the last refuge of their artistic expression. An exhibit at the Gregg Museum of Art & Design at North Carolina State University highlights the work of exiles. It's called "Textiles of Exiles," and is running concurrently with another exhibit called "Barkcloth, Bras, and Bulletproof Cotton: The Powers of Costume." Host Frank Stasio talks about both exhibits with museum director Roger Manley.

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State of Things
11:28 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Season 1, Ep 10: Jade City Pharaoh - Home

Even superheroes get stressed out by hostage situations.

Superhero Herald MF Jones finds himself in the middle of a tense hostage situation when a mild-mannered Jade City citizen named Benjamin Macintosh decides to hold a bank loan officer against his will. What caused Macintosh to snap?

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State of Things
10:57 am
Wed February 29, 2012

Shadows in Flight

Orson Scott Card
Credit www.hatrack.com

When it comes to science fiction, few names are as well known as Orson Scott Card. The Greensboro, NC writer created the novel "Ender's Game," which is a must-have for any true sci-fi fan. His latest work is "Shadows in Flight" (Tor Books/2012) and it follows Bean, a minor character from "Ender's Game," as he travels through space racing to find a cure for a genetic illness that threatens him and his children. Host Frank Stasio talks to Orson Scott Card about his new book and his influence on literature.

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State of Things
10:50 am
Wed February 29, 2012

Growing Power

Will Allen is co-founder and director of Growing Power.
Credit sharedtablessymp.wordpress.com

Will Allen grew up on a farm, but becoming a farmer was the furthest thing from his mind as a child. Allen was a basketball star and his athletic talent carried him through college and into professional leagues in the U.S. and abroad. During a stint in Belgium, Allen got back to his roots and started farming natural foods. He loved having his hands in the soil so much that when he returned to America, he started an urban farm to help members of his community gain access to healthy, organic produce. His hobby became a nonprofit called Growing Power, which is based in Milwaukee, WI with operations in Chicago, IL. But, Allen’s message has traveled worldwide: access to good food should be a basic, human right.

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State of Things
11:49 am
Tue February 28, 2012

College Sports Reform

Charles Clotfelter is the author of ''Big-Time Sports in American Universities''

Big time college sports like basketball and football have a contradictory reputation at many universities. They bring in big bucks and engender loyalty to a school, but they also distract from higher education's primary mission. Are reforms necessary in the college sports system? Host Frank Stasio talks to Dave Dewitt, WUNC's education reporter and a former college basketball player and coach; Charles Clotfelter, professor of public policy, economics and law at Duke University and author of “Big-Time Sports in American Universities" (Cambridge University Press/2011); and Will Blythe, editor-at-large of Byliner and author of “To Hate Like This is to be Happy Forever” (Harper/2007), which chronicles the UNC-Duke basketball rivalry. Listener call-in.

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State of Things
11:15 am
Tue February 28, 2012

To Free a Family

To Free a Family: The Journey of Mary Walker

Historian Sydney Nathans spent most of his career studying U.S. political history and he was just making the transition to social history when he came across an intriguing letter. It was a plea written in 1859 to a North Carolina slave owner, asking for the opportunity to purchase some of the people being held in bondage. The message was sent by a white man named Peter Lesley on behalf of Mary Walker, a runaway who was once enslaved by the family she was attempting to contact. The slaves Walker wanted to purchase were her children and mother. Nathans’ curiosity about that letter, the slave woman’s request and the white man who authored it led him on a decades-long quest to find answers. The history he uncovered has been recorded in a new book, “To Free a Family: The Journey of Mary Walker” (Harvard University Press/2012). Nathans joins host Frank Stasio to talk about his findings and what Walker’s story illustrates about the power of family and community.

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State of Things
10:32 am
Mon February 27, 2012

Meet Steve Sager

Rabbi Steve Sager arrived at Congregation Beth El in Durham over 30 years ago.
Credit www.sichaconversation.org

Rabbi Steve Sager arrived at Congregation Beth El in Durham over 30 years ago. He was 27 years old, trained in the Reconstructionist tradition of Judaism and new to North Carolina. His academic bent and his interest in conversation made the move a good fit. Sager retired last year from the pulpit. Now he has started a new venture that's called Sicha, which means conversation. He wants to help people embrace ancient texts and traditions while deepening their modern lives. Rabbi Steve Sager joins host Frank Stasio in the studio today to talk about his new spiritual chapter.

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