Frank Stasio

Host, "The State of Things"

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.

From there he went to National Public Radio, where he rose from associate producer to newscaster for All Things Considered. He left that job in 1990 to help start an alternative school in Washington, DC. Frank returned to NPR as a freelance news anchor, guest host of Talk of The Nation and other national programs, and host of special news coverage.

He also presents audio theater workshops for children and teachers and conducts radio journalism workshops for broadcasters in former Soviet-bloc countries. He lives in Durham.

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State of Things
11:27 am
Tue March 27, 2012

Get Your 1940 Census Data Here

http://www.ncdcr.gov/

One of the rules of the U.S. Census is that all names must be kept anonymous for 72 years. Historians, genealogists and demographers are eagerly awaiting next week’s big reveal of 1940 Census data - names included.

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State of Things
11:16 am
Tue March 27, 2012

Who Owns the Arctic?

http://cseees.unc.edu/news-and-events/Arctic03282012

The question of who owns the Arctic is under consideration at a conference hosted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill this week. The issue of Arctic sovereignty has arisen largely in response to climate change.

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State of Things
11:07 am
Tue March 27, 2012

Composer Stephen Jaffe Honored

http://www.duke.edu/~sjaffe/

When Stephen Jaffe was a child, his parents forbade him and his siblings from pursuing a career in music. Now all three are professional musicians, and Jaffe is being inducted in the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

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State of Things
10:43 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Meet Beverly McIver

beverlymciver.com

Artist Beverly McIver’s childhood in Greensboro was marred by racism, poverty and the pain of having a mentally disabled sister named Renee. When she left North Carolina to pursue a career as a painter, she never planned to return.

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State of Things
10:42 am
Fri March 23, 2012

Public Policy Polling

Raleigh's own Public Policy Polling first established a reputation for accuracy in the 2008 presidential election, but they stay in news with their sense of humor.

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State of Things
10:39 am
Fri March 23, 2012

Taking a Lesson from Emmett Till

More than a half century before 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was killed by a neighborhood watch captain in Florida, another black teenager named Emmett Till was murdered in Mississippi. “Dar He: The Lynching of Emmett Till” tells his story, with actor Mike Wiley playing all 36 roles in film.

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State of Things
10:29 am
Fri March 23, 2012

Leyla McCalla

Cellist Leyla McCalla was looking for creative inspiration when she left New York for New Orleans. She easily drew crowds on the streets of the Big Easy by performing classical music in a sea of jazz acts. Now, McCalla is working on recording an album of songs, some of which are inspired by the poetry of Langston Hughes.

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State of Things
11:46 am
Thu March 22, 2012

Raleigh's YWCA Closes

After 110 years in Southeast Raleigh, the town's YWCA has closed. The staff was fired on just one day's notice, and the programs that served the community are gone. Journalist Cash Michaels has been following this story closely for the Carolinian newspaper. He joins host Frank Stasio to talk about the sudden closing and its impact in Raleigh.

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State of Things
11:40 am
Thu March 22, 2012

Going to War with Iran

Former CIA analyst Ray McGovern is worried that the United States is going to go to war with Iran. McGovern was an outspoken critic of the conflict in Iraq and he is afraid that a determined Israeli

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State of Things
11:26 am
Thu March 22, 2012

Creeds

Robert Hanssen was an FBI agent responsible for one of the worst intelligence disasters in history. Over 22 years, he passed along American secrets to the Soviet Union and later Russia.

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