Frank Stasio

Host, "The State of Things"

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.

From there he went to National Public Radio, where he rose from associate producer to newscaster for All Things Considered. He left that job in 1990 to help start an alternative school in Washington, DC. Frank returned to NPR as a freelance news anchor, guest host of Talk of The Nation and other national programs, and host of special news coverage.

He also presents audio theater workshops for children and teachers and conducts radio journalism workshops for broadcasters in former Soviet-bloc countries. He lives in Durham.

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State of Things
11:35 am
Tue May 1, 2012

Shareholder Spring

trilliuminvest.com

Two years ago, the Supreme Court allowed unlimited corporate political spending, paving the way for companies like Bank of America to contribute millions of dollars in political donations.

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State of Things
11:27 am
Tue May 1, 2012

Jude the Obscure

When "Jude the Obscure" was published in 1895, the criticism Thomas Hardy received was so harsh that he vowed never to write another book. And he didn’t. Time has ushered this novel into the English canon, and now the Burning Coal Theatre is resurrecting it for the stage as a two-part musical. Host Frank Stasio talks to the play’s director, Jerome Davis, and playwright Ian Finley to discuss the relevance of Hardy’s work more than a century after it was published. Actors Stephen Letrent and Alice Rothman-Hicks, playing Jude and Sue respectively, join to perform scenes from the play.

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State of Things
11:18 am
Tue May 1, 2012

Aviaries

Yvonne Murphy loves a good paradox. Her poetry focuses on the embodiments of irony that are all around us. For instance: the aviary is meant to cage birds without appearing to cage birds.

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State of Things
9:43 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Meet Lauren Winner

www.laurenwinner.net

In 2002, theologian and writer Lauren Winner was feeling blessed to have found what felt like faith’s perfect fit in Christianity. She converted from Judaism and wrote about her spiritual transition in the best-selling memoir “Girl Meets God.”

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State of Things
10:43 am
Thu April 26, 2012

The Novel World

Steve Jobs famously said, “People don’t read anymore.” Ironically, after his death, his biography went on to become the bestselling book on Amazon last year. Nancy Armstrong researches how books –

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State of Things
10:30 am
Thu April 26, 2012

Il Trovatore

www.facebook.com

It's one of the most popular operas of all time and notoriously difficult to perform, but the North Carolina Opera is bringing it to the Triangle this weekend. Il Trovatore, Giuseppe Verdi's masterpiece, pits two enemies against each other in a dramatic love tale that ends with a twist.

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State of Things
5:23 pm
Wed April 25, 2012

Remembering Doris Betts

http://englishcomplit.unc.edu

North Carolina lost one of its most beloved writers and teachers this week. Doris Betts died of lung cancer at the age of 79.

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State of Things
11:37 am
Wed April 25, 2012

Brewing in North Carolina

Erik Lars Myers was disguised as your average IT guy, but he was also diligently spending his nights and weekends brewing beer in his backyard for 13 years. He found the world of beer so interesting that he wrote a popular blog about it called topfermented.com.

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State of Things
11:29 am
Wed April 25, 2012

Rock Star of the Stars

by Patrick Queen for Columbia Magazine

Neil deGrasse Tyson is a rock star of the stars. The astrophysicist is one of the most famous faces in science. Tyson is the director of the Hayden Planetarium in New York, a research associate at the American Museum of Natural History and the host of the PBS show, “NOVA scienceNOW.”

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State of Things
11:17 am
Wed April 25, 2012

Goliath

Outsourcing has sent many of North Carolina's manufacturing jobs overseas, siphoning the lifeblood out of some small communities.Author Susan Woodring witnessed this when she moved to North Carolina in the late '90s, and she decided she wanted to write about it.

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