Eric Hodge

Host, "Morning Edition"

Eric Hodge hosts WUNC’s broadcast of Morning Edition, and files reports for the North Carolina news segments of the broadcast. He started at the station in 2004 doing fill-in work on weekends and All Things Considered.

In August 2004, he took over the Morning Edition slot where he enjoys the challenge of bringing North Carolina news to listeners each weekday. Eric moved to Carrboro from New York City in 2000. He worked for the BBC and XFM radio while living in London, England. He has also run his own music marketing company, worked for major record labels in both New York and London, and worked on the Grammy Award nominated Harry Belafonte project, "The Anthology of Black Music."

Eric grew up in Michigan, trained at the Broadcast Center in St. Louis with CBS's KMOX radio and worked at a variety of stations in the Midwest and upstate New York.

Ways to Connect

The State Employees' Credit Union is preparing to help people who may be laid off as part of North Carolina's attempt to balance the state budget. The Credit Union is updating its mortgage assistance program to help more people stay in their homes. Mark Coburn is the senior vice president of loan servicing for the Credit Union. He says partial payments, rate modifications and extending the term of mortgages can all help.

goduke.com

College basketball's March Madness is about to engulf fans across the country. At Duke University, an engineering professor says the usual suspects will dominate the NCAA Tournament. And Adrian Bejan says that can be explained by his theory of Constructal Law. He says great basketball players tend to wind up at the same colleges and universities in the same way water flows to a single point through many small streams that join bigger and fewer river channels.

Pisgah National Forest
usda.gov

A forestry law pushed by civic and business leaders in Asheville one hundred years ago is being celebrated today. The Weeks Act allowed the federal government to purchase private land for the establishment of National Forests. sg

James Lewis is a historian at The Forest History Society. He says what started in Asheville has grown to almost 20 million acres nationwide. 

Robert Plant
robertplant.com

A rock n' roll legend, former lead singer of Led Zeppelin Robert Plant has stayed busy as of late. His latest release is called "Band of Joy" and his current tour brought him through Raleigh recently. WUNC's Eric Hodge sat down with Plant to talk about the new album. Click "Listen Now" to hear the interview.

The Civil War began 150 years ago. As part of a four year commemoration, the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill is opening an exhibit today at Wilson Library. The display includes about one-hundred-sixty items that help tell the story of what happened in and around Chapel Hill and the University during the conflict. Susan Ballinger helped organize the collection. She says there are some very interesting documents to read:

James Guseh with NCCU students Desiree Lewis, Timeika White and Kaia Clarke
Leoneda Inge

Presidential politics in Africa and in the African Diaspora has flooded the news in the New Year. There is the stand-off in the Ivory Coast where nations around the world continue to beg a losing presidential candidate to cede power to the winner. And just recently – a former dictator of Haiti returned home – raising questions of his intentions as the country tries to rebuild. A professor at North Carolina Central University says he can’t change the world – but he can help change his home country of Liberia.  So he’s running for president.  

One of the biggest solar farms on the east coast is now generating power for customers of Duke Energy. The joint project with Sun Edison is located in Davidson County. Jason Walls works for Duke Energy. He says the facility will generate enough electricity to power 26-hundred homes.

Economic growth and protecting the environment were at the heart of the Green Future for Economic Development Summit held in Raleigh Wednesday. Urban planners along with business, government and non-profit leaders met at the McKimmon Center on the N-C State campus. Sig Hutchinson chaired the event. He says business leaders are drawn to the Triangle in-part, by clean water and air.

Abigail Washburn
abigailwashburn.com

Singer, songwriter, and banjo player Abigail Washburn is out with a new solo album called "City of Refuge." She plays at Berkeley Cafe in Raleigh tomorrow tonight and will be on A Prairie Home Companion on Saturday.

People interested in offshore energy development along the North Carolina coast are invited to attend a series of public hearings this week. The meetings are being organized by Governor Bev Perdue's Scientific Advisory Panel on Offshore Energy. Seth Effron from the state's energy office says even though there's a moratorium on drilling for oil and gas, there are other sources to consider.

Family and friends of America's fallen soldiers and civilians lost since 9/11 will be among the attendees at a ceremony on Fort Bragg today. Base officials are unveiling a monument honoring the dead this afternoon. Sergeant Major LaMonte Caldwell is participating in the event. He says its very personal for him:

 "I've lost a total of 11 soldiers that worked for me in my command and then also the fact that 36 was injured or maimed during the last operation that was in Afghanistan."

Officials at Appalachian State University are planning to sell beer brewed in the chemistry department. Faculty and students began a class on fermentation last spring. But current rules prohibit selling the fruits of their labor.

Brett Taubman is an assistant professor of chemistry at ASU and a home brewer:

fireworks
firstnightraleigh.com

New Year's Eve festivities are scheduled to take place all across North Carolina beginning this afternoon and extending into the early morning hours. There's everything from a pickle drop in Mount Olive to a bluegrass concert at Garner's Historic Auditorium. In the state capitol, First Night Raleigh activities begin at 2pm with a series of events for kids including a parade.

WUNC Morning Edition host Eric Hodge talks with Back Porch Music hosts Freddy Jenkins and Keith Weston about some memorable music events of 2010.  Inspired by NPR's year-end music series.

Justin Townes Earle
myspace.com/justintownesearle

Singer-songwriter Justin Townes Earle has forged a sound that harkens back to another era. His albums are crisp and his live performances inspired. The latest album, "Harlem River Blues" is something of a love letter to New York City. WUNC's Eric Hodge sat down with Justin Townes Earle before he played Cat's Cradle Monday, December 13th, 2010.

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