Dick Gordon

Host, "The Story"

Before coming to North Carolina Public Radio to host The Story, Dick Gordon was host of The Connection, a daily national call-in talk show produced in Boston, from 2001 to 2005.  Gordon is well-known in the profession as an experienced, seasoned journalist with an extensive background in both international and domestic reporting. He was a war correspondent and back-up host for the CBC's This Morning, a national current affairs radio program.  An award winning journalist, he has also served as a Parliamentary reporter, Moscow correspondent and South Asia correspondent for both radio and television. 

In his career Gordon has covered the conflicts in Bosnia, Kashmir, Afghanistan, Indonesia and Sri Lanka as well as the unrest in South Africa, Mozambique, Pakistan, India and the Middle East.  He has received two Gabriel Awards, two National Journalism Awards and has been nominated twice for the ACTRA Award for excellence in reporting. He is a graduate of Queens University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada and the Kent School, Kent, Connecticut.

Pages

The Story
3:34 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Marching On Washington: A Photographer, A Minister, A Student, A Ranger

A woman at the March on Washington
Credit David Johnson/ Library of Congress

By the morning of Aug. 28, 1963, Naomi Moore, Jurgen Ahler, David Johnson and Gunny Gundrum had traveled to the heart of Washington D.C. – some from across town, others from across the country – for an event that none of them would forget.

Read more
The Story
11:48 am
Fri August 2, 2013

The Day A Long Distance Swimmer Met A Baby Whale

Credit WikiPaintings

When Lynne Cox was 17 years old, she'd already broken several world records for long-distance swimming. She'd crossed the English Channel twice and always trained. One morning, she was swimming in the ocean off Seal Beach, Calif., before the sun was up.  Suddenly, she realized a baby whale was following her. She couldn't swim back to shore because he'd follow her and run aground, so she stayed in the water with him for hours and hours, hoping his mother would come back for him. Cox tells guest host Phoebe Judge the story of Grayson.

Read more
The Story
2:58 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Journey To The Centroid Of The Country

A topographer at work with an alidade and plane table.
Credit U.S. Geological Survey Photographic Library

What's a centroid? It is a hypothetical calculation of the exact center of the U.S. population. It involves the U.S. Census and has changed over the country's 220 years, sometimes falling in a town and at other times settling in the middle of rural country. Orion Magazine writer Jeremy Miller explores the centroid and finds that its movement has matched the country's westward expansion and development.

Read more
The Story
3:39 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Growing Up With Anne Frank

Amsterdam, 1937. Children sit in a sandbox, including Anne Frank (second from left) and Barbara Rodbell (second from right).
Credit Barbara Rodbell

In 1933, when Nazi power was surging, Barbara Rodbell's family left Germany for Amsterdam. There, in the Jewish community, Barbara and her sister became good friends with Anne Frank and her family. The Nazis began to round up Jews in Amsterdam and at age 17, Barbara chose to hide in plain sight - to pass as a non-Jew. She took off her yellow star and obtained false identification papers. She connected with a group of resistance activists, and this is how she survived.

Read more
The Story
4:59 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

A Digital Detox From Wired Technology

Credit thedigitaldetox.org

At 23, Levi Felix was the vice president of a startup in California, making a good salary, but he was working around the clock, not eating well, and sleeping with his cell phone under his pillow. Then, one day he felt weak and checked himself into the hospital.

When his doctors ordered him to slow down, he set off on what would become three years of around-the-globe traveling and completely disconnecting from technology.

In this conversation, Felix tells host Dick Gordon what he learned about disconnecting and how he brought it back to the U.S. through what he calls Digital Detox, a summer camp and retreat for anyone who wants to get away from her gadgets.

Hear the full conversation at The Story's website. Also in this show: Ed Rosenthal went for what he thought would be a short hike in the Mojave Desert, then wound up lost; and Margareta Claesson and her husband, noted physiologist Knut Schmidt-Nielsen, studied the camel and found the key to its survival is in its nose.

Read more
The Story
7:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

An American In The Cold War, Caught In The Stalin Family's Agony

George Krimsky in Moscow
Credit Krimsky Family

George Krimsky had been living in Moscow for a few months when he met the grandson of an infamous dictator: Josef Stalin. Krimsky, an American correspondent with the Associated Press, quickly sensed he had a major story in front of him.

The grandson, Josef Alliluyev, told Krimsky that his mother had defected to the United States in 1967, and that he wanted to join her. In order to do that, the grandson said, he would need Krimsky’s help to send and receive letters from his mother.

Read more
The Story
3:23 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

In Chicago Factory, A New Era For Worker Ownership

Ricky Macklin
Credit The Working World

Two former workers from the bankrupt Republic Windows and Doors factory, Armando Robles and Ricky Macklin, talk with host Dick Gordon about what has happened since they held a lock-in in 2008. In May this year, with help from labor organizations in Chicago and a loan from The Working World, they were able to “fire the boss” and start an employee-owned factory, New Era Windows Cooperative. “We used to always say that owners need workers, but workers don’t necessarily need owners,” Macklin says.

Read more
The Story
12:12 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

For Evangelical Pastor, A Road From Belief To Atheism

Credit Perseus Books

Jerry DeWitt spent most of his life working as an evangelical preacher in Louisiana. Then, two years ago, something happened.

He got a phone call from one of his parishioners asking him to pray for her seriously injured brother.  DeWitt realized that he had no proof that praying was going to do anything to save this man and it was unfair to get the sister’s hopes up. He couldn’t do it.

DeWitt left the church and is now an atheist.  The transition has not been easy.  He has been ostracized from his community and his family, but says that he could no longer spend his life doubting the very existence of something that he was leading others to believe.

Hear the full conversation at The Story's website. Also in this show: how a group of students and professionals created a human-pedaled helicopter that can rise higher than 10 feet and hover for more than a minute.

Read more
The Story
7:02 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

Hunger Strike: A Protest Across California

Untitled by Zdislav Beksinski
Credit WikiPaintings

For the past two weeks, thousands of California inmates in solitary confinement have been protesting conditions in security housing units with a hunger strike.  Among the demands: that a photograph be allowed in the cell, and that counseling and more nutritious food be provided.

Read more
The Story
5:09 pm
Fri July 19, 2013

A NATO Pilot Meets The Serbian Commander Who Shot Him Down

Lockheed F-117 Nighthawk
Credit U.S. Department of Defense

Dale Zelko and Zoltan Dani had no reason to ever meet. But in 1999, Zelko, a NATO pilot, was flying an F-117A Nighthawk stealth fighter over Serbia. And Dani, a colonel with the Yugoslav Army, shot down Zelko’s stealth bomber, becoming a national hero for defending his country.

That was their first meeting. As Zelko parachuted to the ground, he thought about the man who'd hit him.

"I imagined standing next to the Serbian surface-to-air missile officer who shot me down," Zelko says. "I imagined standing next to him at a café, and I imagined saying to him, 'Really, really, really nice shot, but you're not going to get me.'"

Read more

Pages