Dave DeWitt

Reporter @DaveDeWitt

Dave DeWitt is currently working on the year-long North Carolina Teacher Project. He came to WUNC in 2003 and spent four years on the staff of The State of Things.

He regularly files for NPR’s news magazines as well as Marketplace and Only A Game. He is a graduate of Denison University and formerly worked in college athletics, college admissions, and with the Tar Heel Sports Network. In 2001, he wrote the non-fiction book "True Blue".

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Politics & Government
2:33 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

More Voting Changes In Watauga County

The Watauga County Board of Elections has restored several polling sites in Boone. That comes a day after the State Director of Elections indicated she would not approve a plan to combine the three sites into one location. 

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Politics & Government
4:29 am
Fri September 6, 2013

No More Pre-Registration Puts Youth Vote In Question

North Carolina was one of only 12 states to pre-register 16-and-17 year olds to vote.
Credit Malate269 / Wikimedia Commons

As the legislative wheels turn, the Voter Identification Verification Act was introduced, debated, and passed at light speed. It was late July - the last week of the General Assembly’s session - when Republican leaders introduced the sweeping voting changes.

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Politics & Government
4:01 am
Wed September 4, 2013

State Elections Board Weighs In On High-Profile Cases

Montravias King is a senior at Elizabeth City State University and a candidate for City Council.
Credit Dave DeWitt

Richard Gilbert, who goes by Pete, is the chair of the Republican Party in Pasquotank County. Over the years, he’s ambled into the County Elections Board meetings in that coastal county and challenged the legitimacy of dozens of voters, many of them students from Elizabeth City State University.

His argument is almost always the same: that the college students who live in dorms there aren’t permanent residents.

So it wasn’t a surprise when he challenged the candidacy of Montravias King, a senior at the historically black university, who had filed to run for city council.

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Politics & Government
4:43 am
Tue September 3, 2013

State Board Of Elections To Hear Disputed Local Cases

Local County Board of Elections meetings are usually quiet, lightly attended affairs. But in Watauga and Pasquotank Counties, recent meetings have been acrimonious and highly partisan.

Last month, the Watauga County Board of Elections moved a polling site off of the Appalachian State University campus. Across the state, the Pasquotank County Board of Elections denied a college student a chance to run for local office. Both decisions were decried by Democrats as efforts to suppress the votes of young people. Since this spring, all local Boards of Elections are Republican-majority.

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Education
3:06 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Frazier Appeals Firing To NCCU

Henry Frazier III has retained a high-profile attorney to represent him in his case against NC Central.
Credit NC Central University

The football coach recently fired by N.C. Central is making an appeal to get his job back. Henry Frazier, III says he was wrongly terminated.

Frazier says his second arrest in two years came after he tried to inform his ex-wife that he would be paying a parking ticket on their car. Frazier was suspended last year after being arrested for spousal abuse and was subjected to an order of protection.

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Education
4:14 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Wake County Beefs Up Bus Routes

Wake Schools pumped $2 million into its transportation system.
Credit Dave DeWitt

Most traditional-calendar public schools open their doors to students starting this morning. In Wake County, all will be on its extensive transportation system.

Last year was, by most anyone’s standards, a disaster for the bus system in Wake County. Hundreds of students were late for school, stranded at the wrong bus stop, or simply not picked up. It came about because buses were removed from routes to save money when implementing a choice-based student assignment plan.

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Education
5:00 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Two New Chancellors Welcome Students

Debra Saunders-White is the first woman to permanently serve as Chancellor at NC Central.
Credit NC Central University

College students began meeting their new roommates and unpacking boxes last week at several of the large universities in the Triangle and Triad. This year, the freshmen won’t be the only new faces on campus.

Carol Folt began her first official day on the job as chancellor at UNC-Chapel Hill a little over a month and a half ago. She replaced Holden Thorp, who is now the provost at Washington University in Saint Louis. Folt comes to Carolina from Dartmouth. She’s the first woman to lead UNC-Chapel Hill.

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Education
2:25 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

App State Students Suffer Under Voting Changes

Students at Appalachian State University will no longer be able to vote on campus.
Credit Appalachian State University

On the same day Governor Pat McCrory signed sweeping election changes into law, the Watauga County Board of Elections made several decisions that raised the ire of democrats in western North Carolina.

The three-member Board, with a 2-to-1 Republican majority, voted to close the early voting site on the Appalachian State campus. The Board also consolidated the three voting sites in Boone into one polling place. That means more than 9,000 voters will vote at one site. The next most populous polling place in the county has fewer than 5,000 voters.

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Politics & Government
9:33 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Brand New N.C. Voter ID Law Already Facing Challenges

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 6:31 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Voting rights advocates are focusing their sights on North Carolina. The ACLU and the NAACP filed lawsuits challenging the state's new voting rules just minutes after Governor Pat McCrory signed the bill into law yesterday.

Dave DeWitt of North Carolina Public Radio reports the new law does more than merely require voters to show an ID at the polls.

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Education
4:34 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Teachers, Universities Will Hurt From Loss Of "Master's Bump"

Teachers will no longer be able to raise their salaries by earning a master's degree.
Credit Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools

The automatic salary bump that comes when teachers earn a master's degree is going away.

Michael Martin is a teacher. His wife is a teacher’s assistant. They love their jobs and work in adjacent rooms in their school in Buncombe County, teaching special needs students and raising three kids of their own. But their life’s work comes with a real-world sacrifice, here in the state that ranks 48th in the country in teacher salaries.

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