Dave DeWitt

Managing Editor for News

Dave DeWitt is WUNC's Managing Editor for News. As an editor, reporter, and producer he's covered politics, environment, education, sports, and a wide range of other topics.

He has filed storites for NPR’s news magazines as well as Marketplace and Only A Game. He formerly worked in college athletics, college admissions, and with the Tar Heel Sports Network. In 2001, he wrote the non-fiction book "True Blue".

 

Ways to Connect

Class Gift

Apr 26, 2011

High School graduation is right around the corner. Seniors are busy with end of year exams, getting a graduation gown, and getting ready for what comes next.

Nikea Randolph remembers the moment when she decided music was going to be her life. 

Raleigh has been named the winner in a national sustainability contest. The city took the top prize in the Siemens Sustainable Community Awards in the mid-size community category.

150 years ago today shots rang out at Fort Sumter South Carolina, marking the beginning of the Civil War. In Charleston, Re-enactors will play out the day's events. Here in North Carolina, the state office of historical records will re-release documents that tell the story of the state's older confederate soldiers. The "Senior Reserves" were men between 45 and 50 years old who were drafted in the last year of the war.  Also, UNC Chapel Hill is launching a website, Civil War Day-to-Day.

Waiting For Super Geek

Apr 11, 2011

This is a period of unrivaled education reform. Charter schools, teacher merit pay, diversity policies - all efforts to improve what many see as a failing public school system. But every effort needs evidence as to whether it is working. Much of it comes from standardized testing. That puts even more emphasis on the most effective way to analyze the growing amount of data. The information is being used in all kinds of ways, from what classes a student takes to teacher merit pay and, in some cases, termination.

Tata
Wake School Choice

Wake County Schools Superintendent Tony Tata says the task force he created to come up with a new student assignment plan is making progress.

Tata re-assigned 6 staff members to work on the plan full-time. He says they are working on specific plans now, checking to see how viable they might be.

Environmental groups are urging the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to reconsider approval of a new design for nuclear power plants in North and South Carolina. The AP-1000 Oversight Group filed a petition with the NRC. The group argues that the AP-1000 reactor design is flawed and should not be used at Shearon-Harris and other sites. John Runkle is the attorney for the group. 

President Richard Brodhead says Duke University will end its salary freeze. In 2009, the school froze wages and made cuts to deal with a shrinking endowment.

Today is the five-year anniversary of the founding of the North Caroline Education Lottery. When it was created in 2006, North Carolina was one of the last states east of the Mississippi to create a lottery.

Research out of Duke University shows that a gifted curriculum has great benefits for students, even those students who aren’t originally identified as gifted.

The study placed 5,000 students across North Carolina into gifted programs, some of whom were not identified by educators as being gifted. Many of those students soon performed well-enough to be identified as gifted.

Bev Perdue
Office of the Governor

Leaders in business, education, and government gathered in Raleigh today to discuss the future of student readiness. They were there as part of the "Many Voices, One Goal" Education Conference.

The president of the national organization that represents community colleges visited Guilford County yesterday. Walter Bumphus was in the state as part of a national listening tour.

Bumphus included North Carolina in his travels because of the state’s robust and comprehensive community college system. There are 58 community colleges in North Carolina, serving nearly a million students. Scott Ralls is the president of the North Carolina Community College system.

He says the down economy has meant laid-off workers arriving on campuses in droves:

Teachers March For Jobs

Mar 18, 2011
Teachers protesting
Dave DeWitt

More than 1,000 teachers from around the state took to the streets of Raleigh today. They were in town for the North Carolina Association of Educators annual conference. They are protesting, in part, against possible budget cuts in the General Assembly that could lead to tens of thousands of teachers and school personnel being laid off. The Legislature is trying to plug a $2.5 billion dollar budget gap.

The North Carolina Association of Educators will hold its annual convention in Raleigh today. The teachers' group is also expected to march through the city streets.

North Carolina's teachers are facing thousands of potential layoffs across the state and a nationwide trend portraying them as entrenched and ineffective.

Wake County high schools have been placed on “accredited warned” status by the agency that accredits them.

The AdvancED report (pdf) states that the school board has"created a climate of uncertainty, suspicion, and mistrust throughout the community."

Duke Energy

Duke Energy CEO Jim Rogers says his company will continue to pursue building new nuclear plants in the Carolinas. Rogers spoke yesterday during a hearing of the North Carolina Utilities commission. Rogers was discussing the development of the Lee Nuclear Station in South Carolina. Duke is asking to spend $285 million to continue to develop the plant. Some of the money will likely come from a rate increase on North Carolina customers.

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