Dave DeWitt

Reporter @DaveDeWitt

Dave DeWitt is currently working on the year-long North Carolina Teacher Project. He came to WUNC in 2003 and spent four years on the staff of The State of Things.

He regularly files for NPR’s news magazines as well as Marketplace and Only A Game. He is a graduate of Denison University and formerly worked in college athletics, college admissions, and with the Tar Heel Sports Network. In 2001, he wrote the non-fiction book "True Blue".

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Arts & Culture
6:00 am
Fri June 24, 2011

The Civil War And The Dukes

Washington Duke
Credit Duke Homestead

Before the Civil War, North Carolina was a poor, agrarian state. The people who lived here were renowned for their independence. It was a quality that would serve the state well after the war.

Washington Duke was a penniless, ambivalent Confederate soldier in the spring of 1865 when he was released from a Union prison in New Bern. Ahead of him was a 130 mile walk home to Durham - waiting for him there were 4 children, no wife, and a ransacked farm.

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Sports
5:50 am
Fri June 17, 2011

UNC Football Takes Another Hit

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has released more documents compiled in its investigation into the football program. UNC

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Education
5:10 pm
Tue June 14, 2011

Wake School Board Races Heat Up

The races for Wake County School Board are heating up. Five seats are up for grabs in this fall’s election.

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Education
5:40 am
Tue June 14, 2011

Wake Testing Choice Model

Wake County Parents are getting a chance to test drive one of the two proposed student assignment plans.

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Education
6:00 am
Mon June 13, 2011

Teaching The Civil War

Brick At Stagville
Credit Dave DeWitt

The first public school in North Carolina was created in 1840. Before the Civil War, those schools were reserved only for Whites. And then, four years after the war ended, the system was revived.

Segregated schools were the law in the state for much of the 20th century. And as you might imagine, the Civil War was taught much differently depending on the color of the students’ skin.

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Politics & Government
6:00 am
Wed June 8, 2011

Perdue Touts Grad Rates

Gov. Bev Perdue
Credit Office of the Gov.

  Governor Bev Perdue and state education officials are touting the state’s improved high school graduation rate  - and criticizing Republicans for making cuts. 

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Business & Economy
6:00 am
Tue June 7, 2011

Equal Pay Elusive For Women On Campus

Last month, U.S. News and World Report ranked the Durham-Chapel Hill area as the best place in the country for gender equality in the workplace. As one reason, the magazine cited the area’s percentage of highly-educated women. It might seem obvious that the area’s progressive universities are part of the reason… but the truth is, universities are lagging in equal pay for women. 

Nan Keohane was a young, ambitious political science professor at Swarthmore when she got her first taste of gender inequality. 

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Education
3:18 pm
Fri June 3, 2011

Wake Schools Brace For Budget Cuts

Tony Tata
Credit Wake Schools

Educators across the state are reacting to the state budget making its way through the legislature today. 

 Wake County Superintendent Tony Tata prepared his budget on the premise that the state’s largest school district would receive 5 percent less than it did the previous year from the state. The current budget is more like 6 percent. But Tata isn’t complaining. 

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Education
4:40 pm
Thu June 2, 2011

State School Board Slams GOP Budget

 The State Board of Education voted unanimously on a resolution that sharply criticizes the budget passed by the state senate today. They say it will lead to thousands of teachers and teacher assistants being laid off. 

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Education
6:00 am
Tue May 31, 2011

Public To Have Say On Wake School Plans

Officials with Wake County Schools are visiting high schools across the county this week. They are holding public hearings on two very different proposed student assignment plans.

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