Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the Newsdesk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

The world was a demonstrably different place when Kevin Anderson and John Isner first took the court Friday for what would become a marathon Wimbledon semifinal. Tough as it may be to recall that heady era when the world was still young, we assure you it existed.

But boy does it look distant now.

The Republic of Ireland took a crucial step Thursday toward becoming the first country in the world to divest from fossil fuels. Lawmakers in the Dail, the lower house of parliament, advanced a bill requiring the Irish government's more than $10 billion national investment fund to sell off stakes in coal, oil, gas and peat — and to do so "as soon as practicable."

Updated at 12:15 a.m. ET on Friday

On Thursday, two days after its original deadline, the Trump administration announced that it has complied with the first part of a court order to return the nearly 3,000 migrant children separated from their parents in recent months.

The NFL had intended for its rule to achieve a resolution.

When President Trump signed the executive order last month that ended the separation of migrant families, he effectively swapped one controversial practice for another — in this case, the indefinite detention of whole families.

Of the nearly 3,000 migrant minors who were separated from their parents and placed in federal custody, the Trump administration says at least 102 are under 5 years old. And for several weeks, administration officials have been under a court-ordered deadline: Reunite those young children with their parents, and do it quickly.

Half a year after Myanmar prosecutors announced they'd seek charges against two Reuters reporters for allegedly violating state secrets, a court in Yangon has ruled that the controversial case can proceed. The decision Monday means Wa Lone, 32, and Kyaw Soe Oo, 28, will stand trial.

Former Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has been sentenced to 10 years in prison for his role in the massive corruption scandal that caused his ouster last year. The country's National Accountability Bureau handed down the verdict Friday, pairing it with a seven-year sentence for his daughter Maryam, whom many consider his political heir.

Updated at 8:15 a.m. ET

As the day dawned across the U.S. on Friday, a new economic reality dawned with it: The tariffs long threatened against billions of dollars in Chinese goods took effect just at midnight ET while many Americans were sleeping — but Beijing was ready immediately with a wake-up call of its own.

For Yemeni nationals currently living in the U.S., Thursday has brought a measure of solace: The Trump administration said it will be renewing the program that for years has shielded them from deportation if they meet certain conditions.

The designation known as temporary protected status, or TPS, has applied to people from Yemen since September 2015, when it was instituted "due to ongoing armed conflict in the country." Currently, the program covers about 1,250 Yemenis who pay hundreds of dollars to re-up their permits every 18 months.

Shoah, a Hebrew word, eludes easy definition. It has bedeviled translators, who have wrestled its multitudes into grim English stand-ins such as "catastrophe" or "calamity" or "annihilation." But no single term quite manages to bear the word's weight.

It was precisely this painful impossibility that drew Claude Lanzmann.

When volunteer British divers managed the remarkable late Monday night, finding 12 Thai boys and their soccer coach stranded on a ledge more than a mile into a complex cave system, they were greeted with a chorus of thank yous — and one very difficult question. It came from the mouth of a lanky boy who had just spent nine days with his teammates stranded in darkness a half-mile below ground.

"When can we leave?"

Updated at 7:50 p.m. ET

Justice Anthony Kennedy announced Wednesday he would be retiring from the Supreme Court. With him go his three decades of experience on the bench and, more politically pressing, his moderate legal philosophy.

It was this centrist streak that made his vote the key in many deeply divisive cases — so many, in fact, that Kennedy earned himself a reputation as the court's quintessential "swing vote."

The first suspect charged in the 2012 Benghazi attacks has been sentenced to 22-year prison term for his role in the deaths of four Americans, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens. Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khatallah received his sentence for conspiracy and providing support for terrorism Wednesday in Washington, D.C.

District Judge Christopher Cooper's decision caps a winding legal saga for Khatallah, who was captured in Libya by American forces in 2014.

Many in Spain believe the practice began as early as 1939, the year the dictator Gen. Francisco Franco came to power: newborns taken without their mothers' consent — often even without their knowledge.

Typically, when a headline pairs the words "police" and "detain," it's fair to assume those police officers did the detaining. It's in their job description, after all.

But what unfolded early Sunday in the Mexican state of Michoacán wasn't exactly typical.

Updated at 5:40 p.m. ET

Tens of thousands of people gathered Saturday in Ethiopia's capital, Addis Ababa, bearing flags and seeking a glimpse of a reformist leader whose tenure is just months old. Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed was in the central Meskel Square to deliver a speech — but not long after he finished, a deadly blast unraveled the crowd.

Just about 10 days ago, Katie Arrington was celebrating a hard-fought electoral win. The conservative South Carolina state lawmaker had dealt longtime incumbent Rep. Mark Sanford a surprising defeat in the state's congressional GOP primary.

Now Arrington, 47, is in the hospital facing quite another kind of fight.

A friend had been driving the U.S. House hopeful Friday night when their car was struck by a vehicle driving the wrong direction on the highway, according to her spokesperson.

Updated at 5:09 p.m. ET

In the image, a little girl wails in uncomprehending sadness and anxiety.

Her face flushed nearly as pink as her shirt and shoes, she stares up at her mother and a U.S. official, both too tall to be seen. The 2-year-old Honduran child's panic is so palpable, it's difficult for a viewer not to feel it, too.

More than a decade and a half after a weeks-long sniper rampage paralyzed the region around Washington, D.C., one of its two perpetrators is likely to get new sentencing hearings. An appeals court in Virginia confirmed Thursday that several of Lee Boyd Malvo's life sentences without parole must be vacated.

The regional office for Immigration and Customs Enforcement in Portland, Ore., stands quieter than usual. Since Wednesday, the keyboard clatter and quiet murmur of officials working inside have been replaced with an unfamiliar sound, coming muffled through the walls: the chatter of angry campers outside.

And that's precisely the way the demonstrators want it.

Seated in the Oval Office on Wednesday, flanked by his vice president and secretary of homeland security, President Trump walked back an administration practice that has separated more than 2,300 children from their parents along the border.

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

After more than a year of complaints and warnings — some subtle and others a little less so — the Trump administration has announced that the United States is withdrawing from the United Nations Human Rights Council. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley announced the decision in a joint statement Tuesday.

Federal prosecutors have charged a former CIA software engineer with stealing secret material from the agency and passing it along to "an organization that purports to publicly disseminate classified, sensitive, and confidential information."

On Thursday, after nearly two months of violence and upheaval, some residents who ventured into Nicaragua's city streets Thursday discovered something that had become something of a rarity: quiet.

Right around dawn Sunday, an unidentified person stole into an art exhibition space in Toronto. Encased in a sweatshirt, with hands in armpits and face obscured by a camouflage cap, the dark-dressed lurker slinked into a room lined with works by Banksy.

Milos Zeman, president of the Czech Republic, had an important announcement — but he wanted it to be a surprise. So he called a news conference Thursday.

Pages