Christina Blyde

Intern
Dr. Leslie Smith speaks on the State of Things.
boonesunriserotary.org

This episode was a rebroadcast.  The program originally aired on Monday, February 25, 2013.

When Leslie Smith was 24 years old, she was in a fire. After spending 3 months at the Jaycee Burn Center in Chapel Hill, she was released. Smith told Host Frank Stasio “It took me about ten years to recover from those injuries.”

The film adaptation of Frank Yerby's 1946 best-selling novel, The Foxes of Harrow.
wikipedia.org

African-American literary authors like James Baldwin or Zora Neale Hurston are famous for their depictions of black life. But these novelists have also written books with white protagonists. Why is this unexpected? Is there a mandate that black authors write only about black characters?

kairabamusic.com

Diali Cissokho, a Senegalese musician, moved to the United States several years ago hoping to meet like-minded musicians. He formed the band Kaira Ba with four North Carolina natives.

facebook.com/bastardfilmencounter

A bastard film is a film that does not fit into any particular category. Bastard films are offensive, disturbing or just plain nonsensical.

Figure 8 Films Production About Twins Conjoined At The Head / Figure 8 Films

Bill Hayes is the founder of Figure 8 Films, a Carrboro production company which created hits like "Jon & Kate Plus 8," "Nineteen Kids and Counting," and "Sister Wives."

Hayes grew up on a chicken, tobacco and dairy farm in the quiet town of Mt. Airy, North Carolina. When colleagues and friends told him he was crazy for starting a production company in North Carolina, he said, "why not?" Bill Hayes joins host Frank Stasio to discuss his success as a documentarian, producer and director.

Mount Moriah band
Andrew Synowiez / mountmoriah.com

Mount Moriah is getting ready to continue their national tour for their critically-acclaimed album, "Miracle Temple." The band was signed by Merge Records and this is their first release under the new record label. "Miracle Temple" offers fans more of Heather McEntire's soulful vocals and lyrics but takes chances with a more intricate sound. Host Frank Stasio talks with founding members Heather McEntire and Jenks Miller about the band's incredible success.

President Bill Clinton meets Dr. Megan Coffee in Haiti
doctorcoffee.org

Experts are in Durham today and tomorrow, attending a conference on Haiti. Their goal is to assess and improve aid efforts to the country following the devastating earthquake there three years ago.

It's a collaboration between Duke University and North Carolina Central University called, “Humanitarianism in Haiti: Visions and Practice."

UNC Student Body President Paul Dickson introduces speaker Frank Wilkinson at the McCorkle Place wall
Jock Lauterer, unc.edu

Free speech is considered a hallmark of universities across the nation, but in the 1960s, that wasn't always true. At least not for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In 1963, the North Carolina legislature passed a speaker ban, prohibiting communists from speaking on campus.

Students on campus bristled at the notion that they could not listen to anybody they chose.

The Third Expression
reverbnation.com

  The Third Expression is an interesting hodgepodge of genres -- jazz, roots music and country -- and they only hit the Durham scene about two years ago.

Elaine Neil Orr
nigerianfaithful.org

Elaine Neil Orr was born and raised in Nigeria, the daughter of Baptist Missionaries. When she began writing her memoir about 10 years ago, her mother gave her a keepsake – the 1853 diary of the first Baptist Missionary in Nigeria. This artifact spoke to Orr, and it was the inspiration for her first novel, “A Different Sun: A Novel of Africa” (Berkley Trade/2013).

Chris Benfey
mtholyoke.edu

Several years ago, Chris Benfey decided to write a traditional memoir. He soon realized, however, that his family was anything but traditional. His new book, “Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay” (Penguin/2012), is part memoir, part history, part archeology.

It tells the stories of his ancestors’ work as bricklayers, his father’s escape from Nazi Germany and his great aunt and uncle’s pivotal role in the founding of Black Mountain College. Chris Benfey is a Professor of English at Mount Holyoke College. He joins Host Frank Stasio to discuss his family’s North Carolina stories.

Spanish catechism for the Catholic Church
book cover, amazon.com

Today, Pope Francis officially became the 266th Pope for the Catholic Church, and the first representative of the New World. The 265 men who served before him were all European, but Pope Francis was born in Argentina, where he continued to serve until the church tapped him for the top job in Rome.

cambridge.org

When we talk about terrorism we usually think of drones, suicide bombers or some other kind of technological weaponry, but its roots go back much further.

University of Georgia Press

  Medgar Evers’s assassination was a spark that motivated social activists and inspired writers, poets and journalists. Artists like Bob Dylan, Eudora Welty and James Baldwin have contributed to the collective memory of Evers through their own works.

Minrose Gwin, professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, talks to host Frank Stasio about her new book, “Remembering Medgar Evers” (University of Georgia Press/2013).

Neal Hutcheson

  For nearly 300 years the Core Sound community has earned a livelihood from the commercial fishing industry. It’s a livelihood that is now seriously threatened. “Core Sounders” is a new documentary that tells the story of a community in transition.

Host Frank Stasio is joined by Walt Wolfram, executive producer and professor of English at North Carolina State University; and Neal Hutcheson, the Emmy-Award winning director, to talk about their new film, “Core Sounders.”

Library
NCSU.edu

The James B. Hunt Library at North Carolina State University is a revolution in information storage.


At the Hunt, robots fetch the books. Two million volumes are folded into one ninth of the space they would have taken up in a conventional library because room for humans to walk through the aisles is unnecessary.

darkershadesofsymphony.com

Front man Michael Seebold describes his band, Darker Shades of Symphony, as neoclassical metal. If you’ve never heard of that genre, you’re probably not alone.

www.ackland.org

The exhibition "More Love: Art, Politics, and Sharing since the 1990s" looks at love as a political force. Thirty-three pieces by 25 artists look at our need for deeper human connection in a world that has been changed by politics, technology and consumerism.  Host Frank Stasio is joined by curator Claire Schneider; and Amanda Hughes, director of external affairs at the Ackland Art Museum, to discuss the works of art.

Dr. Leslie Smith speaks on the State of Things.
boonesunriserotary.org

When Leslie Smith was 24 years old, she was in a fire. After spending 3 months at the Jaycee Burn Center in Chapel Hill, she was released. Smith told Host Frank Stasio “It took me about ten years to recover from those injuries.”

“I had bandages from my neck down to my thighs where my burns were, and then from my thighs down to my ankles where they had taken skin to do skin grafting operations. So I literally was covered from ankle to neck in bandages.”

jonshain.com

Jon Shain grew up in a run-down mill town outside of Boston, but got a sense for the finer things in life at Duke University. He also became aware that the well off don’t always recognize the plight of the poor.

brianhare.net

The last ten years have seen a revolution in our understanding of dogs, and Brian Hare has led the way.

Hare is an Associate Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology at Duke University and the co-author – with his wife, Vanessa Woods - of “The Genius of Dogs: How Dogs Are Smarter Than You Think.”

“Everybody who has a dog is excited to tell you how smart they are,” he said on The State of Things. “But what science is able to contribute is that we compare dogs to other species and we’ve found that dogs are really remarkable.”

How remarkable?

Without training, Hare says dogs are able to learn words and make inferences. Some dogs learn words the first time they encounter them.

Dogs self-domesticated about 40,000 years ago, Hare says. “They chose us, so they got friendlier and they got smarter as a way to live with humans.”



Dogs are very good at solving problems on their own, but they may not be the heroic animals they are often made out to be in popular culture. Hare cites the “bookcase test” where a research project was done to test what dogs would do when its master was pinned under a bookcase and calling for help.

“The truth was, the dog didn’t run off and seek help,” Hare said. “In fact, the dogs just sort of stand around doing nothing.”

Hare has started a website, dognition.com, that will allow dog owners to play a series of science-based games that will reveal their dog’s unique abilities and help build a stronger dog/owner relationship.

  Not so long ago, Anna Rose Beck didn't think she could sing. She came to Durham to study biomedical engineering at Duke University, but eventually music pulled at her, and she decided to make it her life.

ucpress.edu

Deborah Hicks  grew up in an Appalachian paper mill town she hoped to escape. Her education opened doors for her to leave and travel to other parts of a country, but she returned time and again to Appalachia as a teacher. Deborah has dedicated her life to educating those that need her most - focusing on young girls in poor neighborhoods. She is the founder and director of PAGE, Partnership for Appalachian Girls' Education, in Madison County.

canopymeg.com
canopymeg.com

Meg Lowman has spent her life exploring the treetops. She was dubbed the real-life “Lorax” by National Geographic for her work exploring forest canopies and identifying the species that live there.