Charlie Shelton

Producer, "The State of Things"
Pat McCrory
Dave DeWitt

Gov. Pat McCrory vetoed two bills this week that stirred controversy as they passed through the state legislature. 

House Bill 405- dubbed by opponents as an "ag-gag" bill- would have allowed businesses to sue employees who secretly recorded animal abuse or other illegal activity. The bill applied to farms, along with businesses like restaurants and daycare centers.

An image of Franklin Street in Chapel Hill
Wikipedia / Creative Commons

Update: Read a summary detailing some of your feedback about places not mentioned in the New York Times article.  

Kenan Memorial Stadium at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
William Yeung / Flickr/Creative Commons

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announced today it has received a Notice of Allegations from the NCAA. It is the second set of allegations UNC has received in the past five years.

The NCAA reopened its examination into academic irregularities at UNC last year. The notice is expected to outline allegations of fraudulent classes taken by student-athletes at the university.

Merge Records Co-Founder and Frontman for the indie band Superchunk, Mac McCaughan professional photo.
Lissa Gotwals / Merge Records

 

Mac McCaughan has worn many musical faces. Twenty five years ago, he helped start the band Superchunk and the independent music label Merge Records. He has also recorded under the name Portastatic.

 

Google Fiber logo
Wikipedia

 

 Google Fiber and the Nonprofit Technology Network are trying to  help more people get online. The groups launched the Digital Inclusion Fellowship Thursday to get the more than 60 million Americans not using the Internet plugged into online resources

 

An image of a police officer speaking
Charlie Shelton / WUNC

How much will it cost? When would it be recording? Who could access the videos? These are a few questions that have surrounded the public forums about body cameras hosted by the Durham Police Department. But Tuesday evening's forum prompted a different question:

What will it change?

Wake Forest University

Stephen Colbert was at Wake Forest University this morning to give graduates a send-off with one of his trademark commencement speeches.

 

The comedian will soon make the switch from his own satirical political program to taking over David Letterman’s late-night talk show, but he first took some time to tell a new generation that the future looks, well… like a “dark chasm of yawning uncertainty.”

An image of a man protesting in Durham
Ivan Almonte

Mexico is thousands of miles away from North Carolina, but Victoria Bouloubasis said she felt like she was there when a friend showed her a video from his phone.

“I am in a Mexican restaurant in Durham and looking at this tiny screen of a video of police brutality in rural Mexico,” Bouloubasis said.

“It was crazy because somebody took the video on their smartphone, put it on Facebook and to see something completely barbaric by the police you had to wonder about the parallels happening in the States.”

A collaged picture of a diverse women's face
Addicting Info

We recently released a survey asking people about their experience with race in North Carolina. The responses ranged from personal stories on race's influence in daily interactions to how race is affecting public opinion. From the state's rural communities to its larger cities, people recognized that race relations are changing, but we still have a ways to go.

John Howie Jr.

The Back Porch Music on the Lawn concert series returns Thursday night at the American Tobacco Campus in Durham with a performance by honky-tonk musician John Howie Jr. The concert is free and will start at 6 p.m.

 

The Chapel Hill country singer will play with the Rosewood Bluff and will be joined by Tonk. But before he gets on stage Thursday evening, Howie Jr. decided to stop by WUNC to talk with Eric Hodge about his approach to writing country songs and life as a parent.

An image of Bill Guthridge cutting down the net
UNC Atheltic Communications

 

Bill Guthridge, former UNC men’s basketball coach, died Tuesday, according to university officials. He was 77 years old.

The Kansas native spent more than three decades on the coaching staff in Chapel Hill. Guthridge was Dean Smith's trusted assistant coach for 30 years before serving as UNC's head coach after Smith's retirement in 1997.

An image of chickens on farm
Charlie Neibergall / Associated Press

 

North Carolina officials are closely monitoring an outbreak of the avian bird flu spreading in the Midwest and Western United States. Thirty million birds have either died from the disease, or have been killed as a preventive measure to control the flu from spreading, according the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Captain Luke
MusicMakers Relief Foundation

Captain Luke, legendary blues musician, died early Tuesday morning at the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. He was 87. 

 

Captain Luke, otherwise known as Luther Mayer, helped start the Music Maker Relief Foundation with Tim Duffy in the 1990s. The organization works with struggling roots and blues musicians to help preserve their music.

 

An image of students tossing their graduation caps
Ian Norman / Flickr

 

Famous speakers will address thousands of college students across the state for commencement ceremonies in the coming weeks. As people in the crowd turn their tassels, these speakers will step on stage and try to deliver inspiring stories and advice to charge a new generation of college graduates.

 

A picture of UNC grad turning their graduation tassle
UNC-Chapel Hill

Graduation ceremonies kick off this weekend for colleges and universities across North Carolina. But before hundreds of students walk across the stage to get their diploma, they will be charged by a commencement speaker. 

Speakers will share stories and words of wisdom as the graduates begin their next chapter. This year's roster ranges from a late-night talk show host to a U.S. Congressman. Here are the people students and attendees should look forward to hearing this graduation season.

Mad Men Mondays: Rolodex, Miller Lite And Salem Cigarettes on "Lost Horizon"

May 5, 2015
Mad Men Mondays
John W. Hartman Center, Duke University Rubenstein Library

In partnership with the advertising gurus at Duke's Hartman Center, we give you another installment of "Mad Men Mondays," a series of observations, reviews, and reflections on AMC's Mad Men series.

An image of Andrew Marlin and Emily Frantz of Mandolin Orange
Alex Loops

 

Chapel Hill musicians Andrew Marlin and Emily Frantz have been busy the past year touring as the folk duo Mandolin Orange. But all roads lead back home for the pair.

 

Their new album, Such Jubilee, is a celebration of home and a revered tribute to the places and people they cherish.

Image of shadowed figure with hood
Pixabay

 

Across the country, more than a million black men are “missing” from everyday life, according to a recent New York Times article. There are more than 70,000 missing black men in North Carolina.

 

An image of hands raised
Creative Commons

  From Ferguson to Baltimore, events have unfolded across the country with race at center stage.

American media coverage has reported on protests and investigated lethal altercations between black males and police officers.

Mad Men Mondays Double Feature: "The Forecast" And "Time & Life"

Apr 27, 2015
Mad Men Mondays
John W. Hartman Center, Duke University Rubenstein Library

It's time for another installment of "Mad Men Mondays," a series of observations, reviews, and reflections on AMC's Mad Men series published by folks from the Hartman Center

The series' final season is going by fast and this week we are diving into not one... but two episodes to continue opening up the archives of advertising from Duke University's Rubenstein Library.

Same-sex married couple
Reema Khrais

The Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA) awarded WUNC  with an impressive six Edward R. Murrow Awards on Thursday. The Murrow Awards honor outstanding achievement in electronic journalism. This is the fifth year in a row WUNC has received regional awards.

Six is the most Murrow Awards awarded by any large market radio station this year. WUNC led its market with awards for a large market radio station. The 2015 regional winners include: 

Breaking News

Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn
MerleFest

The beat of hundreds stomping their feet to the southern sounds of MerleFest returns this weekend. The annual festival starts this Thursday in Wilkesboro and brings three days and four nights of folk and bluegrass music back to the foothills of North Carolina.

 

A picture of the US Supreme Court building.
Daderot / Wikipedia

 

 Voting districts are back on the table for the North Carolina Supreme Court, but not by choice.

 

The U.S. Supreme Court threw out the state Supreme Court ruling on Monday that upheld Republican-drawn legislative and congressional districts. It ordered the North Carolina Supreme Court to reconsider whether the redistricting of 2011 relied too heavily on race.

 

Photo: The North Carolina General Assembly's Legislative Building
Jorge Valencia

From gay marriage to puppy mills, North Carolina state legislators have filed more than 1,600 bills this legislative session and they are not even halfway done.

Many bills will not make it through the General Assembly, but some are still causing a stir.

Profile of Hillary Clinton
Wikipedia

Hillary Clinton announced this week she will be running for president and wasted little time starting her campaign in Iowa.

 

North Carolina is expected to be a battleground state for the former Secretary of State and a recent poll shows she has work to do here winning over voters.

Aerial view of Wayne Community College campus
North Carolina Association of Community College Trustees

Updated Friday, April 17, 1:46 p.m.

Wayne Community College in Goldsboro has closed for the weekend. The college website says it closed at 10 a.m. Friday morning after receiving "several threatening phone calls over the last two days."

College authorities say the campus was not in danger today and acted "purely from a precautionary perspective."

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