Catherine Brand

Host, "All Things Considered"

Fed up with the frigid winters of her native state, Catherine was lured to North Carolina in 2006. She grew up in Wisconsin where she spent much of her time making music and telling stories. Prior to joining WUNC, Catherine hosted All Things Considered and classical music at Wisconsin Public Radio. She got her start hosting late-nights and producing current events talk shows for the station's Ideas Network. She later became a fill-in talk show host and recorded books for WPR's popular daily program, Chapter A Day. 

Catherine is just as comfortable on stage as she is behind the microphone. She holds a Masters Degree in Vocal Performance from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She enjoys using her musical background in her work with the North Carolina Symphony. For the past several seasons, she has hosted a pre-concert program called Meet the Artists. Catherine adores being a being a mom and loves spending time exploring the natural world with her beautiful little girl, Wren.   

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Law
7:10 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Overall Crime Drops In NC But Murders Rise

Overall crime across the state is down by nearly one percent, according to the latest statistics from the North Carolina Department of Justice. That makes the 2011 crime rate the state's lowest since 1977. It also marks the third consecutive year of decline. It's not all good news, though. Murder is up by almost six percent. Overall crime in some Triangle-area counties, including Chatham and Franklin, appears to be on the rise.

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Arts & Culture
6:36 am
Fri March 2, 2012

Exhibit Opens on Roanoke Island's Role in Civil War

An exhibit about Roanoke Island's role in the Civil War opens at the Outer Banks Visitor Center today. Curator Kaeli Schurr says capturing the island was an important part of the strategy for both the confederacy and the union.

Kaeli Schurr: After a long summer of both sides training troops and devising military strategy, both knew that whoever would be able to control the supply lines would control all of eastern North Carolina. And that led then to being able to disrupt the supply lines from Wilmington up to the Confederate capital in Richmond.

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Arts & Culture
12:00 pm
Tue February 28, 2012

Triangle Hosts Food Symposium

The future of food, farming, and sustainability are topics at a symposium today and tomorrow at UNC and Duke. Jaqueline Olich is from the Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies at UNC; she's also one of the coordinators of the event. According to projections from the United Nations, Olich says food production will have to increase by up to 100-percent by the year 2050 to sustain an estimated 9 billion people.

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Education
11:30 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Chatham Schools Promote Physical Activity

Chatham County schools are trying to get kids to be more active through 'Eat Smart Move More' grants. The goal of the project is to encourage schools and teachers to integrate physical activity into the curriculum no matter what the discipline. Holly Coleman is with the Chatham County Health Department:

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Environment
5:15 am
Wed February 8, 2012

Thomas Built Buses Recognized for Environmental Stewardship

The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources is designating High Point-based Thomas Built Buses as an "Environmental Steward." Julie Woosley is the manager of the state's Environmental Assistance Center. She says Thomas Built recycles 100% of the waste it creates.

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Health
7:50 am
Fri February 3, 2012

New Clinic to Treat Rare Disorder

UNC Chapel Hill this afternoon will officially mark the opening of its new Comprehensive Angelman Syndrome Clinic at the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities. Anne Wheeler is a psychologist at CIDD; she's also co-coordinator for the new clinic. She says Angelman Syndrome is a rare congenital disorder that occurs in about 1 in 15-thousand births.

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Politics & Government
3:36 pm
Thu January 26, 2012

Perdue Not Seeking Second Term

North Carolina Governor Bev Perdue announced today that she will not seek a second term this year. The Democratic Governor was the first woman elected to the position and all indications were that she planned to seek re-election.

Environment
8:20 am
Wed January 11, 2012

Charging Stations Open at Rest Stops

Drivers of electric vehicles in the Triangle and Triad will be able to take advantage of new charging stations in Alamance County. There are two on either side of I-40-I-85, at a rest area near Burlington. Julia Casadonte is a spokeswoman for the state Department of Transportation.

Julia Casadonte: Part of the idea of establishing this infrastructure is to make people more comfortable driving electric vehicles cuz people have to be confident they can be charged and remain charged and make sure they're not stranded anywhere.

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Environment
5:18 pm
Wed January 4, 2012

Harp Seals Dying as Ice Shrinks

A harp seal pup on unstable ice in the Gulf of St. Lawrence Canada
Credit Stewart Cook/International Fund for Animal Welfare

Warmer temperatures in the North Atlantic over the last several decades have resulted in significantly higher mortality rates of baby harp seals. A new study out of Duke looked at satellite data of ice conditions in the Gulf of St Lawrence, a major breeding region and compared them to yearly reports of dead seal pups that washed up on shore. Lead researcher David Johnston is a scientist at the Duke University Marine Lab:


David Johnston:  These animals have evolved to take advantage of the advan tages of ephemeral surfaces like ice.

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Science & Technology
11:09 am
Wed November 2, 2011

NC State Device Monitors Floods, Droughts

North Carolina has seen its fair share of both flooding and drought over the past several years. One of the problems has been getting accurate information, especially in rural areas. Francios Birgand is a biological engineering researcher at N.C. State. He led the development of the 'Gauge-Cam'. He says he and his team wanted to explore the possibility of using wireless imaging technologies to help track water flows in streams and rivers.

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