Carol Jackson

Digital News Editor

Carol Jackson has been with WUNC since 2006. As Digital News Editor, she writes stories for wunc.org, and helps reporters and hosts make digital versions of their radio stories. She is also responsible for sharing stories on social media. Previously, Carol spent eight years with WUNC's nationally syndicated show The Story with Dick Gordon, serving as Managing Editor and Interim Senior Producer.

During her career in media, she has won a number of awards for producing innovative media projects, including numerous EMMY citations and a WEBBY (commonly called The Oscars of the Internet). Previously, Carol served as Director of Educational Production for Maryland Public Television. She grew up in Epsom, NH and attended Emerson College in Boston.  Carol and her family are happy to be in North Carolina – near to her husband's extended family in Smithfield and Apex.

Ways To Connect

Many schools in the region have delayed openings or are closed. Here's a complete list from our friends at ABC 11:

The Twitter feed and the YouTube channel of U.S. Central Command were compromised on Monday, a Pentagon spokesman said. The hackers put up Islamic State propaganda and switched the avatar from the CentCom logo to a photo of a masked fighter. On Twitter, the hackers released what they purported was a phone list of retired U.S. generals, as well as what appear to be presentation slides from the government-funded Lincoln Laboratory at MIT.

Jenna McLaughlin (foreground) during the kayak trip.
Jenna McLaughlin

Baby it's cold outside. So cold that many schools across the state took a little extra time to warm up the school buses, and doors opened late. An N&O reporter went on a ride-along to with the Durham Rescue Mission to find people living in the woods.

It rarely gets this cold in here in the Carolinas, so we took to Twitter to see what people are saying.

Update January 7, 2015:

In the summer of 2014, we heard about a vintage photo that was found tucked away in one of the books at the Chapel Hill Public Library. No one knew how long the picture had been there, but the photo caught our imagination. Who was this Duke Blue Devil?

For a time, the mystery appeared to be solved.  The son of a Duke alum, Donald Brandon, wrote to say, "It looks like Bill Werber."

Longtime ESPN anchor Stuart Scott died of cancer Sunday morning. He was 49 years old. Scott was known for his on-camera presence, and the catch-phrases he coined. 

"Boo-Yah!" 

"He must be the bus driver cuz he was takin' him to school."

The broadcaster was beloved in the Carolina community. He went to high school in Winston-Salem, and later attended University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he worked at the campus radio station, WXYC.  After graduation, he worked at stations around the country, and then was hired to help launch ESPN 2.

People who visit the WUNC website tend to like science and education. You click on stories that give context to the news and you also like the occasional quirky story.

Glen Van Etten's family makes a wish each New Years Day prior to releasing balloons.
Glen Van Etten / Flickr/Creative Commons

My fire pit is standing by, waiting for its annual New Year's Eve workout.

During the day final day of the calendar year, we clean the yard and place pretty much every branch we find into the fire pit. My 13-year-old son takes great pleasure in crinkling up old homework assignments for kindling.

We light the blaze at dusk. As the fire gets going, we jot down sentiments on a piece of paper; we include things that bother us, or that we want to let go of.

We made you a mixtape. A really long mixtape. In the past, we've kept this list, of our favorite songs of the year, to 100 songs. Not this year. Instead, we turned our tidy list of songs into a massive, party-starting player in which you can actually listen to every single one of the 302 songs we loved this year, from every genre we cover.

Now this is surprising:

Students in Neal Magnet Middle's STEM Academy building robots.
Carol Jackson

There's a school program in Durham North Carolina that is preparing low-income African American boys for science, technology and engineering careers. The program is not focused on those who are failing, but rather those who have been chosen for their potential to succeed. WUNC's Carol Jackson has this profile:

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