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Deceptive Cadence
5:05 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Chronicle Of A Death Foretold: New York City Opera Shuts Its Doors

The New York City Opera let its final curtain fall Saturday night at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in a production of Anna Nicole by Mark-Anthony Turnage.
Stephanie Berger

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 6:16 pm

This morning the New York City Opera announced that it was declaring bankruptcy and ceasing operations. Dubbed "The People's Opera" by Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia when it was founded 70 years ago, the company was meant as an alternative to the richer Metropolitan Opera. It's the place where exciting young singers like Beverly Sills and Placido Domingo made their New York debuts and where innovative productions of new operas premiered.

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Health Care
4:37 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Health Exchange Day One: A View From California

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 6:38 pm

Transcript

PAULINE BARTOLONE, BYLINE: I'm Pauline Bartolone in Sacramento.

California, like Colorado, has been full speed ahead in creating its own health insurance marketplace. Melissa Martinez has been looking forward to using it. She works at home as a consultant. She also lives with an autoimmune disease.

MELISSA MARTINEZ: This last bout of insuring myself it was about $600 a month, and my meds - because I have lupus - are about $600 a month. And so I had to pick one or the other. So I let my insurance go.

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NPR Story
4:37 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Colorado's Exchange Opens After Years of Bipartisan Effort

Colorado has taken its own route to building a health exchange.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 10:27 am

Colorado's health care exchange opened as planned today, at 8 am Mountain time. Not long after that, the website started scrolling a message: "Due to overwhelming interest, we are temporarily suspending the creation of accounts, please continue to browse plans."

The state has been planning for this day since 2007, when leaders from both political parties in the state started talking about overhauling health care. It's one of just 16 states that chose to create its own health insurance exchange, rather than using one run by the federal government.

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Shots - Health News
4:37 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

First Step In Health Exchange Enrollment: Train The Helpers

Assisters get up to speed on how best to explain the new health coverage choices during training on Sept. 25 at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, D.C.
Morgan Walker NPR

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 2:06 pm

Even as the Affordable Care Act's new health exchanges open for business, polls show the public is still pretty confused about how they're supposed to work.

The latest monthly tracking poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation, in fact, found that two-thirds of those without insurance said they don't have enough information about the law to know how it will affect them.

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NPR Story
4:35 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

'Eat, Pray, Love' Author Dives Into 19th Century Science

"Eat, Pray, Love" author Elizabeth Gilbert's latest book is "The Signature of All Things: A Novel."

Elizabeth Gilbert is known for her memoirs “Eat, Pray, Love” and “Committed.” But she dives into the world of late 18th and 19th century science to write her first novel in 13 years, “The Signature of All Things.”

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NPR Story
4:35 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Farm Equipment Makers Worry Over Commodity Prices

(Bill Wheelhouse/Harvest Public Media)

While the country’s economy was slumping over the last five years, the American farm economy was booming.

Companies that manufacture tractors and other farm implements have done exceptionally well, as many farmers have been replacing their pricey equipment every year.

But with commodity prices dropping and a major tax break in jeopardy in Congress, there are fears that business will start to stall.

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NPR Story
4:35 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

ADM To Move Its Headquarters Out Of Decatur

Archer Daniels Midlands' headquarters in Decatur, Illinois. (Archer Daniels Midland)

The city of Decatur, Illinois, will no longer be home to the headquarters of global food giant Archer Daniels Midland. ADM is moving its headquarters to a new, as yet unannounced, location.

About 4,400 ADM employees will continue to work in Decatur, some in a new ADM logistics facility.

But the departure of the ADM headquarters leaves Decatur — informally known as the soybean capital of the world — in an even more precarious position economically.

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Youth Radio
4:26 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Puberty Is Coming Earlier, But That Doesn't Mean Sex Ed Is

A growing number of children are entering puberty at younger ages — sometimes as young as 6 or 7. But in many schools, sex education classes don't begin before the fifth grade.
Cuneyt Hizal iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 5:54 pm

For kids growing up in the San Francisco Bay Area, there's a standard introduction to puberty at many schools: an educational play called Nightmare on Puberty Street.

It's a fictional play, and in it, character Natalie raps about how quickly her body is growing — and how her classmates call her names.

"I didn't pick how my body would grow, and I don't feel normal, 'cause I'm not in control."

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The Two-Way
4:00 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

How The Shutdown Is Affecting The Military

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 6:52 pm

Larry Abramson, who covers national security for NPR, sent us this missive, about how the shutdown of the federal government is affecting the Pentagon:

If you are a soldier, sailor, airman or marine, you will be paid during a shutdown. But only half of civilian defense workers are supposed to show up for work, and the rest do not get paid.

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The Salt
3:56 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Shutdown Leaves Program Feeding Women And Infants In Lurch

At a farmers market in Washington, D.C., recipients of federal food assistance like the WIC program can use vouchers to buy fresh fruits and vegetables.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 5:23 pm

Among those affected by the chaos of the government shutdown are 9 million low-income women and children who may be worrying where next week's meal is going to come from.

They rely on the government for food assistance through the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, known as WIC.

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