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The Two-Way
7:22 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Book News: Scores Of Books Burned In Lebanese Library Torching

A man inspects burnt books in north Lebanon's majority Sunni city of Tripoli on Saturday, a day after a decades-old library owned by a Greek Orthodox priest was burned.
Ibrahim Chalhoub AFP/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Around the Nation
7:08 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Detroit Barber Fails To Break Haircut Record

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 6:56 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

It's actually not that surprising that Detroit barber Brian "B-Dogg" Price did not get enough volunteers to help him break the record for most haircuts in one hour. The current record is 34. And would you like a haircut that took less than two minutes? Still, it would be free, so he's reached out to churches and shelters for volunteers for another run at the record this spring. The barber plans to use two electric clippers simultaneously.

Parallels
6:57 am
Tue January 7, 2014

London's Cheeky Skyscrapers

The Shard, the tallest building in Western Europe at 1,016 feet, was inaugurated in London in 2012. It got its formal name when the builders adopted the term used by critics, who called it a "shard of glass" in the city's skyline.
Ben Fitzpatrick AP

Originally published on Tue January 7, 2014 7:58 am

I arrived in London a few days ago for my new NPR assignment. As an unofficial part of my orientation, I decided to take a guided walking tour of the old city.

Yes, the history was fascinating. Yes, the city is beautiful. Well, most of it. Parts are not exactly my taste.

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The Two-Way
6:51 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Florida State Wins A Thriller To Take College Championship

The winning catch: Wide receiver Kelvin Benjamin of the Florida State Seminoles catches the 2-yard pass for a touchdown that put his team ahead for good with just 13 seconds left in the game.
Harry How Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 7, 2014 12:34 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Tom Goldman on the championship game

Florida State and Auburn put on a show Monday night with a college football championship game that went down to the wire and ended with Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Jameis Winston throwing a touchdown pass with just 13 seconds to go to bring Florida State the crown.

At one point, the Seminoles were behind by 18 points.

The final score: Florida State 34, Auburn 31.

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NPR Story
4:59 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Blowing Bubbles And Other Cold Weather Experiments

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 6:56 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Many of you have been sending us pictures of experiments you've been conducting in the bone-chilling conditions.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Madison Wisconsin, where it was minus nine degrees when Lora Keuhl and her two children created their very own cloud.

LAURA KEUHL: We boiled water and then just opened the door and threw it up into the air.

MONTAGNE: Creating an ominous plume of frozen mist.

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NPR Story
4:59 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Can't Stand The Cold Snap? Don't Go To Antarctica

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 6:56 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And with much of the nation is in the middle of this brutal cold snap, let's take a moment to hear from scientists who study other planets or even the chilliest places on Earth. Those researchers commonly encounter temperatures that make this news-making cold seem downright balmy. We asked NPR science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel to find out just how low it can go.

GEOFF BRUMFIEL, BYLINE: I caught up with researcher Paul Mayewski yesterday just as he was headed out of town.

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NPR Story
4:59 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Millions Forced To Cope With Frigid Weather

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 6:56 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

A bone chilling cold snap will affect nearly 200 million people in the United States before it subsides. Many areas of the country have wind chill warnings or advisories in place. The cold is sweeping today, east and even south. The Midwest has been frozen now for a couple days. Here's NPR's Cheryl Corley.

CHERYL CORLEY, BYLINE: Walk down a Chicago street and you might not even recognize your best friend. The frigid temperatures mean just about everybody is bundled - scarves drawn tight, hats pulled down low, often only eyes visible.

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NPR Story
4:59 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Colo. Marijuana Merchants Forced To Deal Mostly In Cash

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 6:56 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business today is: cash only.

Colorado's retailers may be allowed to sell marijuana now, but under federal law, the state's banks cannot knowingly do business with them.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This has forced marijuana merchants in the state to operate almost solely in cash. Denver's city council, not happy. They called yesterday for Washington to change the law.

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NPR Story
4:59 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Microsoft Reveals 'Epic' Xbox Sales

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 6:56 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with console sales.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: Microsoft announced sales of its new Xbox One topped three million units by the end of 2013. In a blog post, the company called it the most epic launch of Xbox, by all measures.

The third-generation console was available a week before Thanksgiving. It's been competing with Sony's new baby, Playstation 4, which also launched in November. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
2:57 am
Tue January 7, 2014

The Secret Burglary That Exposed J. Edgar Hoover's FBI

FBI director J. Edgar Hoover is seen in his Washington office, May 20, 1963. The 1971 burglary of one of the bureau's offices revealed the agency's domestic surveillance program.
William J. Smith AP

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 2:23 pm

More than 40 years ago, on the evening of March 8, 1971, a group of burglars carried out an audacious plan. They pried open the door of an FBI office in Pennsylvania and stole files about the bureau's surveillance of anti-war groups and civil rights organizations.

Hundreds of agents tried to identify the culprits, but the crime went unsolved. Until now.

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