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Tiny Desk Concerts
6:07 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Timber Timbre: Tiny Desk Concert

Timber Timbre performs at a Tiny Desk Concert in February 2014.
Jim Tuttle NPR

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 9:57 am

The music of Canada's Timber Timbre is often strange and unsettling. The band, led by Taylor Kirk — a crooner with a deceptively sweet voice — makes spare, evenly paced songs that sound like late-night echoes from a swampy woods.

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All Tech Considered
6:07 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Tech Week: Target CEO Out, Drones In Question, Apple's Big Deal

Beats headphones are sold alongside iPods in an Apple store in New York City. Apple is reportedly considering buying Beats for more than $3 billion.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Another week in tech is wrapping up with talk of another multi-billion dollar buy. Let's get to it with our roundup, starting with the ICYMI section, which features stories we've been telling on air and online, the Big Conversations in tech and closing with our Curiosities — other fun links you should see.

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Parallels
6:05 am
Sat May 10, 2014

How Loud Is Too Loud? A High-Decibel Debate On Expanding Heathrow

British schoolchildren outside an adobe hut that was built so they could play in a less noisy place when jets fly overhead. The kids go to school near London's Heathrow Airport, where a planes takeoff and land every 90 seconds.
Matt Dunham AP

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 11:44 am

Pippins Primary School is just one of dozens of schools in the neighborhoods that surround London's Heathrow Airport. At recess the students play outside on an asphalt playground. And like clockwork, a jet roars just several hundred feet overhead every 90 seconds. The school is almost directly under Heathrow's flight path.

"It is very loud. It's as if you were standing on the runways," said Janet Mills, a teacher at Pippins. Heathrow is one of the world's busiest airports, and every day Mills faces the challenge of teaching right next door to it.

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Code Switch
6:04 am
Sat May 10, 2014

With Great Korean Barbecue Comes Great Responsibility

As far as stock images go, this one of Korean barbecue seems pretty tasty.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 11:41 am

Go hunting for the best barbecue in America and you might end up in a city that surprises you: Los Angeles. Specifically, the L.A. neighborhood known as Koreatown.

I'm talking about Korean barbecue. If you're unfamiliar, that's thinly sliced, marinated meat grilled right in front of you. Trust me, it's awesome (this guy knows what I'm talking about).

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The Salt
6:03 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Bridging The Cultural Gap With A Mother-In-Law In The Kitchen

Lisa Brown for NPR

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 2:17 pm

In Indian kitchens, patience is a virtue.

Vegetables must be chopped, lentils soaked, spices roasted and ground before slowly simmering everything together. If you try to cut corners, the food just isn't the same.

The same is true for some relationships.

My mother-in-law, Rama Saini, grew up in north India in the early years after independence from the British. At age 19, her marriage was arranged and she moved to Canada with her husband. By 30 she had three children and a thriving business.

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It's All Politics
5:58 am
Sat May 10, 2014

The Congresswoman Whose Husband Called Her Home

Rep. Coya Knutson (D-Minn.), is shown shopping in a supermarket in 1955 following her demand to know why her fellow housewives remain saddled with high grocery bills while farm income continues to drop.
Maurice Johnson Bettmann/Corbis

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 8:06 am

Fifty-six years ago this weekend, newspapers across the nation told a sad tale of a family seemingly imploding.

At the center of the story was Coya Knutson, the opera-singing daughter of a Norwegian farmer, and the first woman from Minnesota elected to Congress.

Voted in on her own merits, not appointed to keep a late husband's seat warm for a successor, the trailblazing mother could only watch as vengeful party rivals, a manufactured scandal, and a feckless, alcoholic husband combined to sabotage her career.

It all came to a head on the eve of Mother's Day 1958.

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The Two-Way
5:45 am
Sat May 10, 2014

'Senior Black Correspondent' Larry Wilmore Takes Colbert Slot

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 9:24 am

But will he pronounce the T in "Report?"

Larry Wilmore, The Daily Show's "senior black correspondent," will take over the 11:30 p.m. slot on Comedy Central after Stephen Colbert leaves for CBS at the end of the year.

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The Two-Way
6:45 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Judge Strikes Down Arkansas Ban On Gay Marriage

A judge in Arkansas has struck down the state's ban on same-sex marriage, a move that clears the way for gay couples to wed.

Here's the judge's order, via Chris Johnson, chief political and White House reporter for the Washington Blade.

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Education
6:08 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Under Restructured Rules, Kansas Teachers Lose Tenure

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 8:45 pm

Kansas lawmakers have passed a bill to make it easier to fire teachers. The legislation will take away some of the employment protections offered to teachers. Supporters say school administrators need the flexibility to remove teachers who aren't performing, but as Kansas Public Radio's Stephen Koranda reports, teachers argue this will allow them to be fired for unfair reasons.

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Books
6:08 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

In A Changing Climate, Science Fiction Starts To Feel Real

cover detail
Courtesy Night Shade Books

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 4:17 pm

The White House released a report this week on the impacts of global warming. Many places are already feeling the effects. There's drought in the Southwest, rising sea levels in Miami, and now even fictional worlds are feeling the burn.

There have been novels about climate change since the 1960's, but to me the definitive example is a book that's not well known outside the field of science fiction: The Windup Girl, by the American novelist Paolo Bacigalupi, which won both the Hugo and the Nebula Awards in 2010.

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