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All Tech Considered
7:03 am
Thu October 24, 2013

What's A 'Glitch,' Anyway? A Brief Linguistic History

Not all glitches are unintentional and problematic. Glitch art introduces, on purpose, digital typos that would otherwise be edited out in an image.
Kevin Wong Flickr

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 11:01 am

HealthCare.gov, the faulty website where people can sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, has become nearly synonymous with the word "glitch" — sometimes defensively, sometimes mockingly.

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Religion
6:32 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Vatican Challenges Church Of England ... To A Cricket Match

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 8:07 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The Vatican has announced it will be engaging in sporting diplomacy with a new team. St. Peter's Cricket Club will be made up of priests and seminarians in cricket-loving countries like India. Still, the Vatican couldn't resist throwing down this challenge to longtime rival the Church of England: Form a team and make it the Anglicans versus the Catholics at Lord's Cricket Ground in London - what you could call the Mecca of that sport. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

It's All Politics
6:03 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Red-State Senators Face Activist Challengers From Within

Timothy D. Easley AP

Re-election trouble is brewing for longtime Republican senators in deep-red states, from South Carolina to Wyoming. And the trouble is from within.

The GOP's restive Tea Party and libertarian wings, energized by their titular leader, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, and funded in part by starve-government groups like the Club for Growth, are waging 2014 Senate primary challenges in six states — and counting.

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Strange News
5:17 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Norwegian Town Uses Mirrors To Try To Come Into The Light

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 8:07 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

A town in Norway has spent all 100 of its winters in the shade. The town is in the mountains, and when the winter sun sinks low, its rays never reach the people in town. That may change. A local artist campaigned to have mirrors placed on a mountainside. When unveiled on October 31st, they should drop a patch of sunlight in the town square. The artist says it will be good for, quote, "the pale little children in town."

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
5:10 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Red Sox Take One-Game Lead In World Series

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 8:07 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Boston Red Sox have taken a one game to none lead over St. Louis in the World Series, beating the Cardinals eight to one last night at Fenway Park. The evening started off badly for the visitors and didn't improve from there. NPR's Mike Pesca was there and has this report.

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NPR Story
5:10 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Teacher Killed By 12-Year-Old Student Remembered

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 8:07 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Two students are in the hospital after a shooting at a middle school in Nevada. A 12-year-old boy killed a popular teacher and then himself. Last night, people in Sparks, Nevada remembered teacher Michael Landsberry. Will Stone reports from KUNR.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Author Interviews
3:17 am
Thu October 24, 2013

'Blockbusters': Go Big Or Go Home, Says Harvard Professor

Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 11:54 am

Movies like The Dark Knight or the Harry Potter series are touted as blockbusters — big-budget spectacles sure to make box office bank.

And though wannabe blockbusters can — and do — flop, like the $120 million disappointment Speed Racer, big budget is still the way to go, according to Harvard Business School professor Anita Elberse.

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Books News & Features
3:17 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Pen Pal Of Young 'Jerry' Salinger May Have Been First To Meet Holden

J.D. Salinger wrote nine letters and postcards to aspiring Canadian writer Marjorie Sheard.
Graham Haber The Morgan Library & Museum

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 9:47 am

Fans of the reclusive J.D. Salinger are in their element these days.

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StoryCorps
3:16 am
Thu October 24, 2013

A 'Not Normal' Family That Knows How To Laugh At Itself

Rebecca Greenberg made her first visit to StoryCorps with her mother. This time her father, Carl, joined them for some laughter and reminiscing.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 11:27 am

When we first heard from Laura Greenberg and her daughter, Rebecca, in 2011, Laura recounted what it was like to grow up in a family that was, as she explained it, "not normal."

"We're yelling, and we're pinching, and we're hugging, and we're cursing, and we peed with the door open," she said about her childhood in Queens, N.Y., in the 1950s. "I didn't know this was not normal behavior. I didn't know people had secrets; you didn't tell your mother everything."

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Shots - Health News
3:16 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Therapists Explore Dropping Solo Practices To Join Groups

The goals of therapy remain the same, but the business side is undergoing big changes.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 11:26 am

In the corporate world of American health care, psychologists and other mental health therapists are still mostly mom-and-pop shops. They build their own solo practices, not unlike Lucy in the Peanuts comic strip gang who hung her own shingle: "Psychiatric Help, 5 [Cents] — The Doctor Is In."

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