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The Supreme Court term that just ended included historic rulings in support of same-sex marriage and the Affordable Care Act. "Political scientists will say that this is a liberal term for the ages," Adam Liptak, the Supreme Court correspondent at The New York Times, tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

The stakes are high for a routine cargo mission to the International Space Station, after a string of failures has left the orbiting outpost running somewhat low on supplies.

Call it the latest sign of "Bernie-mentum" — Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders' latest event in Madison, Wis., on Wednesday drew an estimated 10,000 supporters. He packed the arena at Veterans Memorial Coliseum in the liberal college town.

Sanders said last month that he was "stunned" by the large crowds showing up for him. Organizers were once shocked by 300 in Iowa, then 5,000 in Minnesota.

Mouth Of The Dragon

Jul 2, 2015
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Burning Water

Jul 2, 2015
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A Little White Lie

Jul 2, 2015
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Mortuary Assistant Required

Jul 2, 2015
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This is what has unfolded in Greece in the past week:

June 26: Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras announces a July 5 referendum on terms put forward by the strapped country's creditors and urges his people to vote "no."

Marketplace for Thursday, July 2, 2015

Jul 2, 2015

Airing on Thursday, July 2, 2015: One of Chicago's remaining black-owned banks is in danger of closing, a reality that's part of a national trend. Unlike the more segregated days when these banks were founded, African-American customers can now take their business elsewhere. But black-owned banks provide a link to a proud history, and research says, they may do something a lot more important. Marketplace's Dan Weissmann has the story. Next: forget the baking soda volcano.

U.S. Army recruits young innovators

Jul 2, 2015
Amy Scott

In a hotel in suburban Baltimore, kids file into a conference room wearing Army-issued white lab coats and safety goggles. The middle schoolers are among the finalists in the U.S. Army’s annual eCYBERMISSION STEM fair—20 teams selected from more than 7,000 around the country for their problem-solving projects.

Before the big competition, they break into small groups for some training.

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