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The Two-Way
8:41 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Bill That Bans Undercover Filming At Farms Enacted In Idaho

Dairy cows feed through a fence at an Idaho farm, in this 2009 file photo. Idaho's Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter enacted a bill Friday that criminalizes the act of secretly filming animal abuse at farms.
Charlie Litchfield AP

Idaho's Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter has signed a bill that criminalizes the act of secretly filming animal abuse at agricultural facilities. The move comes days after the state's legislature approved the measure.

"Otter, a rancher, said the measure promoted by the dairy industry 'is about agriculture producers being secure in their property and their livelihood,'" according to the AP.

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The Two-Way
6:56 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Miss. Man Thought Dead, Comes Back To Life On Embalming Table

Seventy-eight-year-old Walter Williams.
YouTube

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 11:23 am

A man in Mississippi whom the coroner had declared dead on Wednesday came back to life once he was put on an embalming table.

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It's All Politics
5:56 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Hillary Clinton's Political Acumen And Other Tidbits From New Docs

Newly released documents by the Clinton Presidential Library shed light on Hillary Clinton's time as first lady.
Mark Wilson Associated Press

Did we learn anything new about Hillary Clinton from the documents released Friday by the Clinton Presidential Library? Was there anything that could matter if she decides to run for president?

The answer so far appears to be no. That said, there were still aspects of the documents that were singled out as interesting flashbacks to Clinton's time as first lady.

Against Individual Mandate Before She Was For It

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The Two-Way
5:39 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Obama Warns Russia Against Using Force In Ukraine

President Obama spoke about the Ukraine crisis Friday afternoon, saying, "The United States will stand with the international community in affirming that there will be costs for any military intervention in Ukraine."
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 10:46 pm

Saying that the United States is "deeply concerned" by reports that Russia is taking military action in Ukraine, President Obama urged Russia not to intervene in the destabilized country, where tensions have reached new highs this week.

Obama said that he had spoken to Russia's President Putin in recent days, to foster cooperation in coping with the situation.

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The Salt
5:22 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

'Peak Salmon' May Be Unlikely, But Threats To Farmed Salmon Loom

Farm-raised Norwegian salmon for sale in Oregon in 2009.
Natalie Maynor Flickr

Earlier this month, reporters at Bloomberg and the Financial Times suggested that we might be nearing "peak salmon" — a play on peak oil, in which we theoretically reach maximum production, and the only direction left to go is down.

Their logic? The price for a kilogram (2.2 pounds) of Norwegian farmed salmon at the end of 2013 was 50 percent higher than it had been the previous year.

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Parallels
5:04 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Syria On Track To Become World's Largest Source Of Refugees

Masses of refugees wait in line to receive food aid distributed in the Yarmouk camp on Jan. 31 in Damascus, Syria.
United Nation Relief and Works Agency/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 10:35 pm

A photo from Syria is grabbing the world's attention: a sea of people lining up for food amid the rubble of a Palestinian refugee camp inside Syria.

Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia was so moved by the image, he took to the Senate floor, saying "a country of 23 million people, a proud country, is being transformed before our eyes to a land of rubble, skeletons, refugees and ghosts."

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Shots - Health News
5:04 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

'Magic' Overdose Drug Works, But Demand And Price On The Rise

Several states distribute Naloxone hydrochloride, also called Narcan, to treat opium-based drug overdoses. But only one company manufactures the drug, and the price has spiked in recent years.
Toby Talbot AP

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 10:35 pm

Calls to the fire department for suspected drug overdoses are increasingly common in Revere, Mass. The department responded to 16 overdose calls in a single six-day stretch in February.

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NPR Story
4:30 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Stay-At-Home Mom's 'DrainWig' Invention Included In Oscar Swag Bag

Jennifer Briggs' invention, the DrainWig, which catches hair lost in the shower and prevents drain clogs, will be in the Oscar swag bags for all the nominees at this Sunday's Academy Awards. (DrainWig)

The Academy Award ceremony is Hollywood’s biggest celebration of movie stars. There is some stiff competition in many of the categories this year, and not everyone will leave with a gold statuette — but they will all get a DrainWig.

DrainWig is a daisy-shaped drain ornament attached to a stainless steel chain with rubber whiskers meant to be inserted into a shower drain to prevent hair clogs. It’s one of the many products featured in this year’s Oscar nominee gift bag, which has been valued at $80,000.

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NPR Story
4:30 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Key West Thief Inspires Crime Writers

An image capture from security footage of the Key West Graveyard Thief. (John Martini)

Key West, Florida, has a history of comically inept thieves and robbers. But a recent crime spree by a stealthy burglar has residents there on high alert.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Mark Hedden of WLRN talked with people who make good money sitting alone in rooms thinking about the kind of characters who commit crimes.

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NPR Story
4:30 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Building A Smaller, Better Army

Soldiers from the U.S. Army's 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, salute during the playing of the Star Spangled Banner, Feb. 27, 2014 in Fort Knox, Kentucky. (Luke Sharrett/Getty Images)

Earlier this week, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel outlined his plan for a downsized military. The plan will shrink the Army to its smallest size since the eve of World War II. At that time, there were around 270,000 active duty soldiers, a number that surged to nearly 1.5 million during the fighting in Europe and the Pacific.

Under Hagel’s’ recommendations, this new Army would be reduced from today’s 522,000 soldiers to between 440,000 and 450,000.

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