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The Two-Way
9:35 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

In Photos: With All Troops Home, Canada Marks End Of Afghan Mission

MCpl Anthony Alliot and Sarah Tooth kiss after the last Canadian troops from Afghanistan returned at Ottawa International Airport on Tuesday.
Cole Burston AFP/Getty Images

During a ceremony in Ottawa on Tuesday, Canada officially ended its 12-year military engagement in Afghanistan by welcoming home the last 93 soldiers who had deployed to the country.

Since the war started in October of 2001, Canada has sent more than 40,000 troops to Afghanistan and 158 of them lost their lives.

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The Two-Way
8:51 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Review Finds Navy Yard Rampage Could've Been Prevented

Aaron Alexis, whom the FBI says was responsible for the shootings at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, D.C., is shown in this handout photo released by the FBI.
FBI Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 12:57 am

A Defense Department review of the shooting rampage at the Washington Navy Yard, which left 12 dead, found the shooting could have been prevented, if the Navy had properly evaluated and reported the gunman's alarming behavior leading up to the shootings.

NPR's Tom Bowman reports that Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has ordered changes in how the government screens its workers and protects its facilities. He filed this report our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
7:34 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Ex-Scouts Who Toppled Ancient Rock Formations Reach Plea Deal

A man topples a rock formation from the Jurassic Period.
YouTube

Two former Boy Scout leaders who toppled rock formations dating back to the Jurassic Period will serve no jail time, but they will have to pay thousands in restitution.

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The Salt
6:58 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

A Bittersweet Goodbye: White House Pastry Chef To Move On

Among Bill Yosses' many confectionary creations for the first family: this nearly 300-pound gingerbread model of the White House, on display in the State Dining Room in November 2012. The house featured not just Bo, the family dog, but also a vegetable garden.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 7:58 pm

The first family must be crust fallen.

Bill Yosses, the White House pastry chef, is moving to New York in June.

"Though I am incredibly sad to see Bill Yosses go, I am also so grateful to him for his outstanding work," first lady Michelle Obama said in a statement. She credited Yosses as "a key partner helping us get the White House Kitchen garden off the ground and building a healthier future for our next generation."

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It's All Politics
6:47 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Obama's Foreign Policy: More Second-Term Misses Than Hits

Russian President Vladimir Putin's actions are beyond President Obama's control, something that holds true for most of the foreign policy issues vexing the U.S. president's second term.
Sergei Ilnitsky AP

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 7:43 pm

Second-term presidents who find their ability to shape domestic affairs limited by congressional constraints often view foreign policy as the arena in which they can post some successes.

Ronald Reagan had his second-term breakthrough with Mikhail Gorbachev, the Soviet Union's general secretary. Bill Clinton had the U.S. lead its NATO allies into taking military action against the Serbian government of Slobodan Milosevic. Much further back in time, Woodrow Wilson successfully negotiated the League of Nations Treaty (though he couldn't win Senate passage for it).

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The Two-Way
6:13 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Oklahoma Court Delays 2 Executions Because Of Drug Shortage

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 8:51 pm

An Oklahoma court put the execution of two men on hold on Tuesday because a five-judge appellate panel was not sure that the state could procure the drugs used to put convicts to death.

Lawyers for the two men asked that their executions be delayed because of the uncertainty surrounding the method.

USA Today reports:

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The Two-Way
6:07 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Study: The Chicken Didn't Cross The Pacific To South America

A Filipino chicken vendor in Quezon City, east of Manila, Philippines. Researchers say Pacific island chicken are genetically similar to the variety found in the Philippines, but different from South American chicken.
Rolex Dela Pena EPA/Landov

An analysis of DNA from chicken bones collected in the South Pacific appears to dispel a long-held theory that the ubiquitous bird first arrived in South America aboard an ancient Polynesian seafarer's ocean-going outrigger.

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Krulwich Wonders...
4:43 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

An Imaginary Town Becomes Real, Then Not. True Story

Booklist American Library Association

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 5:38 pm

This is the story of a totally made-up place that suddenly became real — and then, strangely, undid itself and became a fantasy again. Imagine Pinocchio becoming a real boy and then going back to being a puppet. That's what happened here — but this is a true story.

It's about a place in upstate New York called Agloe. You can see it here, circled in blue ...

... just up the road from Roscoe and Rockland.

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Shots - Health News
4:33 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Teens Say They Don't Text Or Drink While Driving

I'm not really texting. I'm checking my homework assignments.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 11:03 am

Many teen drivers are earnest when they say they know the risks of drinking and driving or texting behind the wheel. But it seems many either ignore those dangers or don't fully understand what it means to drive safely.

About half of teens who say they never text while driving admitted to texting at red lights or stop signs, according to a survey released Tuesday. And while 86 percent of teens consider driving under the influence to be dangerous, one in 10 who say they never drive under the influence actually do drive after drinking.

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Around the Nation
4:25 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Report: Emergency Response Inadequate In Airport Shooting

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 4:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Bad communication, faulty technology, and poor planning - those are just some of the issues highlighted in a report about the deadly shooting last year at Los Angeles International Airport. A TSA worker was killed in that attack and three people were wounded. NPR's Nathan Rott has more.

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