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The bare, plaster walls of Yu Zu'en's new government-issued apartment are adorned with three decorations: an old photo from his years as a soldier, a shelf for his harmonica, and a poster featuring the busts of every Chinese Communist Party secretary since Chairman Mao. He points to the newest one and smiles.

"I wouldn't be here without Xi Jinping," he says. "Under his wise leadership, we're now taken care of. Before, we barely survived. Our village was up in the mountains. Corn didn't grow well, no roads. Then the leaders mobilized us and the entire village moved here."

An anti-corruption court in Pakistan has indicted ousted Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, his daughter and son-in-law, in connection with leaks last year that appeared to show his family owned offshore shell companies they used for the secret purchase of high-value London real estate.

The Associated Press says "a lawyer for Sharif, who is currently in London, where his wife is receiving medical treatment, entered a plea of not guilty. The former prime minister's daughter, Maryam Sharif, and her husband, Mohammad Safdar, attended the hearing and also pleaded not guilty."

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... China's economic growth data came in better than expected today, just as the ruling Communist Party's once-every-five-years conference gets underway. But can the numbers be trusted? Afterwards — it's the 30th anniversary of Black Monday, the single-biggest daily decline in U.S. stock markets. The panic then rippled across the world, leading to double digit declines in places from Australia to Spain to Hong Kong. With global markets hitting fresh highs, have we learned any lessons from the intervening three decades?

Amazon has inked deals with several of the nation’s largest apartment building owners to install Amazon locker systems at residential properties, where packages can be delivered and stored for pickup.

Those contracts could give Amazon a more convenient way to deliver packages to customers in more than 850,000 apartment units across the U.S., the Wall Street Journal reports

Thirty years ago this week, the Dow Jones suffered its biggest one day percentage loss ever — almost 23 percent of its value in just six and a half hours.

On Black Monday, Kenneth Polcari, now a managing director at O’Neil Securities, was a rookie trader on the New York Stock Exchange. The market “just went down, and down. It just never came up for air,” said Polcari, “Johnson & Johnson lost nearly 50 percent of its value in six and half hours.”

Your pension fund could be invested in tech

Oct 19, 2017

The economics of the tech industry is a chain with a bunch of confusing links. Startups get their money from venture capital firms, and we've talked about how that works and why it heavily influences who becomes key players in tech and what products end up in your hands. But how do venture capital firms get their money? Limited partners, or private corporations; state, county and city entities; and universities. Now, continue to follow me down the chain.

10/19/2017: How venture capital gets its funding

Oct 19, 2017

The tech industry’s economy hinges on venture capital. But what does venture capital’s economy hinge on? Private corporations, city entities and universities. These groups, called limited partners, fund firms with endowment money and pension funds, or part of your paycheck. On this episode of Marketplace Tech, we look into the world of limited partners.

Quebec has approved a law that would require citizens of the Canadian province to uncover their faces while giving or receiving any public service — a rule critics say is aimed at Muslim women who wear the niqab or burqa.

Updated at 5:15 a.m. ET

Spain was preparing to impose direct rule over semi-autonomous Catalonia after the region's leader Carles Puigdemont declined to categorically renounce an independence referendum, the prime minister's office announced Thursday.

Spain's government said it would hold a special Cabinet meeting and "approve the measures that will be sent to the Senate to protect the general interest of all Spaniards."

A federal judge in Washington has ordered the Trump administration to allow a detained teenage who is in the U.S. illegally to have an abortion.

The 17-year-old, identified in court documents only as "Jane Doe," is being held in a private facility in Texas after she was apprehended crossing the U.S.-Mexico border last month. She is 15 weeks pregnant and has asked for an abortion.

By the end of November 1965, U.S. officials were well aware that mass murders were underway. At this point, roughly two months into an Indonesian military campaign that would ultimately kill at least half a million people, U.S. Embassy staff privately expressed no shock in reporting that thousands had already been summarily executed.

They did comment on the resourcefulness of the killers, though.

If there's one thing President Trump's critics want from him, and he refuses to give up, it's his tax returns.

The returns didn't come up during Wednesday's hearing in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York in Manhattan. But the hearing was the first step in a process that could loosen Trump's grip on them.

If the next step goes the plaintiffs' way, the case could make the president's tax returns surface.

Editor's note: This story contains graphic language.

As women around the world tell their stories of sexual harassment and assault using the phrase "#MeToo," one prominent voice added her own harrowing account.

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For more on President Trump's role in all of this, NPR's Geoff Bennett joins us now from the White House. Hi, Geoff.

GEOFF BENNETT, BYLINE: Hey, Ari.

Four American soldiers were killed in action in Niger this month.

Their deaths made a few headlines at the time. But this week they are in the news again, with far more prominence, because of a bitter political debate over presidential condolence calls.

The sudden prominence of the soldiers' deaths — but in a way that highlights political tension and factual disputes, rather than honoring of sacrifice — has left some military advocates struggling for words and striving to redirect attention back to the original loss.

To sell his tax plan, President Donald Trump is trying a send message to ordinary Americans: that cutting corporate taxes will benefit you too. Speaking in Pennsylvania last week, Trump claimed that his current proposal — which calls for lowering corporate taxes from 35 percent to 20 percent and which allows companies to bring back overseas money at a low tax rate — will actually translate into a $4,000 pay raise for a typical American household.

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A rerun of the annulled presidential election in Kenya is in jeopardy. Two top election officials say they cannot guarantee a fair process. NPR's Eyder Peralta reports one of them fled to the United States fearing for her safety.

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(SOUNDBITE OF THE TRAGICALLY HIP SONG, "WHEAT KINGS")

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Unpredictable winds continue to fan the fires engulfing huge swaths of land in northern California Thursday. Authorities say more than two dozen people have died and hundreds are still missing, as of Thursday afternoon.

Evacuations in Napa and Sonoma counties have put some 25,000 people out of their homes. Many of these residents only speak Spanish, but most emergency information is delivered in English.

The Pentagon is tightening the screening process for immigrants who volunteer for military service and slowing their path to U.S. citizenship.

The U.S. military will no longer allow green card holders to enter basic training before the successful completion of a background check. The policy change is intended to improve security vetting of foreign-born recruits.

Updated on Oct. 20 at 4:04 p.m. ET

Throughout his presidential campaign and since, President Trump has made bold assertions about his charitable giving. But as the Washington Post has thoroughly documented, those boasts of philanthropy don't always stand up to scrutiny.

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