NPR News & Stories From WUNC

Editor's note: This report includes disturbing descriptions of abuse.

Last June, a jury found former Milwaukee police officer Dominique Heaggan-Brown not guilty of first-degree reckless homicide. Now, Heaggan-Brown is taking a plea deal over separate sexual assault allegations that led the Milwaukee Police Department to fire him.

The shooting death of Sylville Smith, a 23-year-old black man, ignited riots in the north side of Milwaukee in August 2016.

Editor's note: This report includes disturbing descriptions of child abuse.

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET

One year later: we check in on the refugee settlement in Erie, Pennsylvania

Jan 18, 2018

In January of 2017, Marketplace traveled to Erie, Pennsylvania to do a live show the day before President Trump's inauguration as part of our series The Big Promise. The particular politics of Erie, voting twice for President Obama and then for Trump, have made it a microcosm of the larger political and socioeconomic climate in America. That includes the way its economy has changed over the past couple of decades -- specifically, the number of immigrants and refugees who joined the workforce.

You may need to get used to the threat of government shutdown

Jan 18, 2018

There is currently no plan to fund the federal government beyond tomorrow. Lawmakers have yet to agree on a continuing resolution to fund the government. The deadline to do so is this Friday at midnight. To get a sense of how budget negotiations used to go—and whether we can expect the current state of affairs to be the new normal—Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal spoke with Stan Collender, professor of public policy at Georgetown. 

Over the last month, in a series of volatile swings, the price of the cryptocurrency bitcoin rose to a record high — then plunged to less than half that value.

The abrupt changes have inspired comparisons to the dot-com bubble, and underscored the extremely speculative nature of investing in cryptocurrency.

Clock Is Ticking Toward Government Shutdown

Jan 18, 2018

The federal government will partially shutdown Friday night unless Congress approves a spending plan. Democrats also want to get a resolution to the DACA program that covers people brought illegally to the U.S. as children.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young get the latest on the negotiations with NPR’s Jessica Taylor (@JessicaTaylor).

You may have seen an illustration on Martin Luther King Jr. Day showing the civil rights leader with a hand over President Trump’s mouth, trying to get the president to stop tweeting. The artist is Watson Mere, he was born in the U.S., but his parents are Haitian.

Mere (@ArtOfMere_) speaks with Here & Now‘s Robin Young about his image, and the president’s recent alleged comments asking, “Why do we want people from Haiti here?”

The NFL playoffs are down to the final four teams, and the matchup for Super Bowl LII will be set after Sunday’s conference title games.

Here we are again. No federal budget, no government funding beyond the next day or so. There was a time when this state of affairs was brushed off as congressional legislators simply kicking the can down the road, that they'd come to their senses and be, y'know, responsible. But those days seem to be gone, and this economy's getting by on a never-ending series of four-week budget stopgaps. That's how we're starting the show today. Then: a check on the White House's infrastructure plan, which is expected in the next few weeks.

Sound Opinions: New Wave and Alison Moyet

Jan 18, 2018

Jim and Greg talk to Lori Majewski about her book Mad World: An Oral History of New Wave Artists and the Songs That Defined the 1980s, co-written with Jonathan Bernstein. In it, the authors reveal why New Wave caught on so strongly with pop fans and the media, especially post-punk in the U.K. Plus, an interview with Alison Moyet, an English singer-songwriter that came up in the New Wave scene, and is still making waves musically.

Mick Mulvaney doesn’t think the CFPB needs more money

Jan 18, 2018

Mick Mulvaney, the director of the Office of Management and Budget and the acting director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, sent an unusual letter to Fed Chair Janet Yellen yesterday. The CFPB gets its funding from the Federal Reserve like other government bureaus, so each quarter it requests money to keep the bureau going. However, this time no money was requested for the second quarter of this fiscal year.  

That’s right, Mulvaney requested $0 for the CFPB.

India has successfully test-fired a nuclear-capable intercontinental ballistic missile. Indian authorities say the launch sent an Agni-V, a missile with a strike range of some 3,100 miles, flying from an island off the country's east coast in midmorning local time Thursday.

In a tweet heralding the test, Indian Defense Minister Nirmala Sitharaman described it as a "major boost to the defence capabilities of our country."

Moutai baijiu reigns as China's favorite brand of its favorite liquor — but the famously fiery drink is getting hard to find, as bottles are snatched up by market speculators. Renewed thirst for baijiu has sent the value of brand parent Kweichow Moutai soaring, making it the world's most valuable distiller.

Two teenage boys, struggling to make their way back to shore, were saved by a drone in Australia on Wednesday, in what officials say is a first-of-its-kind rescue mission by an unmanned aircraft — one captured by the drone's camera and later broadcast by Arab News and other outlets.

Christian Picciolini was 14 years old when he attended the first gathering of what would become the Hammerskin Nation, a violent, white-power skinhead group. Looking back, he describes his introduction to the group as receiving a "lifeline of acceptance."

"I felt a sort of energy flow through me that I had never felt before — as if I was a part of something greater than myself," he says.

If your New Year's resolution is to cook more, you might be tempted to order a meal kit from a company like HelloFresh, Sun Basket, or Blue Apron. These companies prepare and package up ingredients, along with a recipe and send them right to customers' doorsteps.

For years, some small farmers have been doing something similar —  CSA or community-supported agriculture. Now, some of those farmers say that the meal kit companies are cutting in to that market.

(Markets Edition) The House of Representatives is set to vote on whether to approve funding for the federal government to stay open for a few more weeks. But what happens if the government does end up shutting down? Economist Diane Swonk explains how that could affect the implementation of the GOP's tax overhaul. Afterwards, we'll discuss what Apple plans to do with the billions of dollars it plans to bring to the U.S. from overseas, and whether this decision had to do with the new tax bill.

#MeToo: Rape on the Night Shift

Jan 18, 2018

The #MeToo movement has swept from Hollywood to Capitol Hill. The careers of powerful men ended as women spoke out against workplace harassment and assault. On this episode of Reveal, we look at what happens when the people involved aren’t celebrities or powerful. We team up with KQED, the UC Berkeley Investigative Reporting Program, FRONTLINE and Univision to investigate sexual violence against female janitors. They usually work alone at night and that isolation can leave them vulnerable. A lot of them are immigrants, some living in the country illegally.

Amazon narrows list to 20 for its second headquarters

Jan 18, 2018

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon has narrowed its hunt for a second headquarters to 20 locations, concentrated among cities in the U.S. East and Midwest. Toronto made the list as well, keeping the company’s international options open.

The online retailer said Thursday that after sorting through 238 proposals, the potential locations still include tech-strong places like Boston and New York. Other contenders include Chicago, Indianapolis, and Columbus, Ohio, in the Midwest.

One of the big promises made by Donald Trump during the presidential campaign was that he was going to bring manufacturing back to this country. We spent some time in Pennsylvania talking about manufacturing with people in the industry for our series The Big Promise and spoke with Cary Quigley, the vice president of Sterling Technologies in Lake City.

A former Department of Energy photographer has filed a federal whistleblower suit alleging he lost his job after leaking photos of a private meeting between Energy Secretary Rick Perry and a major Trump donor who heads one of the country's largest mining companies.

The photographer, Simon Edelman, took photos of the March 29, 2017, meeting between Perry and Robert "Bob" Murray, the CEO of Ohio-based Murray Energy, who gave $300,000 to the Trump campaign.

When Army Capt. Mark Nutsch and 11 fellow Green Berets jumped off their helicopter into the swirling dust of northern Afghanistan in October 2001, their Afghan partner informed them they would be battling the Taliban — on horseback.

"In that situation, they're certainly not going to give you their very best horses," Nutsch said dryly.

Updated at 8:46 p.m. ET

The House passed a stopgap funding bill Thursday evening, though the measure now faces uncertainty in the Senate as Republican congressional leaders work to avert a government shutdown by late Friday night.

Republicans need 60 votes in the Senate to proceed on the four-week continuing resolution, which would extend funding only until Feb. 16. That is looking more and more difficult after most Democrats and at least three Republican senators have said they won't vote for the bill.

This past year, 2017, was among the warmest years on record, according to new data released by NASA and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration.

The planet's global surface temperature last year was the second highest since 1880, NASA says. NOAA calls it the third warmest year on record, because of slight variations in the ways that they analyze temperatures.

Both put 2017 behind 2016's record temperatures. And "both analyses show that the five warmest years on record have all taken place since 2010," NASA said in a press release.

Updated at 12:39 p.m. ET

Health care workers who want to refuse to treat patients because of religious or moral beliefs will have a new defender in the Trump administration.

The top civil rights official at the Department of Health and Human Services is creating the Division of Conscience and Religious Freedom to protect doctors, nurses and other health care workers who refuse to take part in procedures like abortion or treat certain people because of moral or religious objections.

How to lower your income tax bill

Jan 18, 2018

One business columnist is so disappointed in the Republican tax overhaul, that he's been on a quest for creative ways to reduce his tax bill. 

"If we had anything like a fair and rational and reasonable procedure, I probably would not aggressively be out cutting my taxes," said Allan Sloan, a Washington Post columnist and Marketplace regular. 

In the competition for Amazon's second headquarters, just 20 metropolitan areas remain in the running.

Last year, Amazon set off a hyper-competitive proposal process, saying that it plans to invest $5 billion in building a second headquarters that could create up to 50,000 high-paying jobs.

The Seattle-based company, which is a financial supporter of NPR, says it reviewed 238 proposals in the U.S., Mexico and Canada. Here are the metropolitan areas that made the cut:

We live in an age of heightened awareness about concussions. From battlefields around the world to football fields in the U.S., we've heard about the dangers caused when the brain rattles around inside the skull and the possible link between concussions and the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

As President Trump approaches his first anniversary of taking office, he and others are taking stock.

"2017 was a year of tremendous achievement, monumental achievement, actually," Trump told members of his Cabinet last week. "I don't think any administration has ever done what we've done and what we've accomplished in its first year."

The president has delivered on some of his major campaign promises. Other pledges are still works in progress, while some commitments have been quietly discarded.

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