NPR News & Stories From WUNC

An NCAA commission is calling on the NBA to reopen its draft to athletes who are 18 and have not attended college, citing problems with the "one-and-done" system that sees elite players jump to the pros after their freshman year.

Created last fall after a federal investigation put an exclamation point on a growing list of crises and conflicting priorities in the sport, the Commission on College Basketball issued its recommendations on Wednesday.

Teacher Walkouts: A State By State Guide

Apr 25, 2018

It's been nine weeks since teachers in West Virginia walked out of their classrooms to protest low wages and rising health care costs. That sparked a movement that has spread to a handful of other states where teachers have fought — or are fighting — not just for higher wages but also increased spending, more pay for support staff and, in some cases, to stop proposed changes to their pensions.

In fact, so much has happened in the past two months that we thought we'd put together a refresher, state by state.

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In Aug. 2017, many Americans were shocked to see neo-Nazis and members of the so called alt-right demonstrating in Charlottesville, Va. But author Kathleen Belew says the roots of the rally were actually decades in the making.

The PGA Tour commissioner wants to see your selfies

Apr 25, 2018

Golf is hundreds of years old, and even today, it’s known more for its traditions than memes. And that makes for a tricky proposition for Jay Monahan, the newish PGA Tour commissioner. “Five years ago, when you came to a PGA tournament, we didn’t let you bring your cellphone on site," he said. Monahan talks with us about bringing social media onto the green, competing against other sports like football and what it’s like when your biggest stars are essentially freelancers.  

Updated at 1:54 p.m.

A prescription painkiller that has been under a cloud for more than a decade is apparently safer than previously believed, a Food and Drug Administration panel concluded Wednesday.

04/25/2018: The real reason the markets are nervous

Apr 25, 2018

(Markets Edition) The 10-year Treasury yield remains above 3 percent, which some are blaming for our market decline. We'll talk with Susan Schmidt, senior portfolio manager at Westwood Holdings Group, about why this narrative might be wrong. Afterwards, we'll look at the connection between high gas prices and SUV/pick-up truck sales, and then we'll visit Midland, Texas, to find out why the region — one of the richest in the nation — has schools that consistently rank among the poorest in Texas. 

Every day, nearly half a million workers stream into the white stone banks and office buildings in the City of London, a single square mile at the historic core of greater London.

It’s the financial capital of Europe, but it’s not all business.

Hidden behind courtyard walls and through narrow passageways are roughly 200 open spaces designed to provide the workers of the city some respite from its hustle and bustle.

The University of Alabama football team is visiting the White House, again, on Tuesday to receive its congratulations. Back in January, Alabama captured its fifth college football championship in nine years, an unprecedented run of success (unless you go back to Princeton and Yale’s dominance in the late 19th century).

U.S. automakers could be headed down a rocky road

Apr 25, 2018

For years, low gas prices fueled sales of SUVs and pickup trucks, and low interest rates made it easier for car buyers to trade up every time some shiny new technology came along. But with gas prices and interest rates rising, and tariffs on imported aluminum and steel driving up costs, automakers are facing an uncertain future.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

"Cellal alaa cogu — health has no price," sighs Haja Bah, looking out on a dusty street in the sprawling eastern suburbs of Freetown, Sierra Leone's capital. "But they have forgotten us ... and many are still really suffering."

President Donald Trump’s nominee for secretary of state took a big step closer to confirmation on Monday night. In a surprise vote, a key Senate committee approved the nomination of CIA director Mike Pompeo for the job. Pompeo is expected to face a vote in the full Senate later this week. One lawmaker who voted "no" is Robert Menendez of New Jersey, the top Democrat on the Foreign Relations Committee.

Menendez spoke with The World’s Marco Werman and the following is a transcript of the full interview.

An Indian court has found Asaram Bapu, a spiritual leader who has founded hundreds of ashrams in India, guilty of raping a teenage girl and sentenced him to life in prison. The much-watched case has prompted worries about possible reprisals from the guru's followers.

Asaram has denied the charges and he plans to appeal, according to a special notice on his organization's website.

Wednesday was the day astronomers said goodbye to the old Milky Way they had known and loved and hello to a new view of our home galaxy.

A European Space Agency mission called Gaia just released a long-awaited treasure trove of data: precise measurements of 1.7 billion stars.

The city of Hoboken, N.J. — just over the bridge from Manhattan's skyline — now joins a growing list of American cities passing bills making public bathrooms "gender neutral."

Signs on all city-owned, single-occupancy restrooms, in the town made famous by its native son Frank Sinatra, will be replaced to reflect the change by May 31, just in time for LGBT Pride Month, Hoboken Mayor Ravinder S. Bhalla says.

(U.S. Edition) As the U.S. increasingly looks to Europe as a model for how to regulate internet companies, we'll look at how Europe is cracking down on one popular communication tool. There's word Whatsapp, which allows you to text and make voice and video calls using encrypted Wi-Fi, will cut off kids under 16. Afterwards, we'll talk to Zanny Minton Beddoes — editor in chief of The Economist — about how she thinks liberalism should adapt to the needs of the 21st century.

 

 

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A Copenhagen court has sentenced eccentric inventor Peter Madsen to life in prison over the murder of Kim Wall, a journalist who was killed after joining Madsen on his submarine last August. Parts of Wall's body were recovered after Madsen claimed he "buried her at sea."

The case has captivated Denmark and drawn international headlines, with its shocking and gruesome details, and Madsen's wildly shifting explanations for what happened.

Found Furnishings is a second-hand furniture store in what locals call “old Midland.”

Kristen Covington, the owner, grew up in the area and went to public schools in the Midland Independent School District. She and her husband have kids age 2 and 5, and education weighs on her mind a lot. 

The Philippine island of Boracay is a tourist magnet, with its beaches regularly appearing on lists of the world's best. It's easy to see why.

"I think this is an amazing beach," says Frida Roemer from Copenhagen, lounging on the island's White Beach. "The clear water, the white sand ... I extended my ticket because I just liked it so much."

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … The fifth time might just be a charm for Japanese drug maker Takeda in its bid to buy Shire. What’s the Irish company’s big allure, and how much is Takeda willing to pay? Then, the yield on the 10-year U.S. Treasury note is at 3 percent for the first time in four years. How does it impact you, and why does that level matter? Afterwards, today marks three years since Nepal was hit with a series of deadly earthquakes. We’ll take you to Kathmandu where one architect thinks he has the answer for making more indestructible buildings. 

When Nepal's twin earthquakes hit three years ago, entire Himalayan villages disappeared beneath tons of earth and rock. Hindu temples dating back to the 10th century shattered into shards of carved wood and stone. Urban glass and steel buildings toppled.

But seven miles from the first epicenter, a three-room public school — built to demonstrate local earthquake-proof techniques — was still standing amid the national ruin of 9,000 fatalities and 800,000 homes destroyed.

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The Economist magazine celebrates its 175th anniversary this year. The publication, according to current editor-in-chief Zanny Minton Beddoes, was founded to espouse "classical liberalism," or the belief that open societies, freer trade and the preservation of individual freedom are important to modern progress. 

But the rising popularity of protectionist policies in the United States, the United Kingdom and other countries has led Minton Beddoes to reevaluate liberalism's role in the world. 

Political campaigns want your data. At least that’s what the Facebook and Cambridge Analytica scandal taught us. But data isn’t just a factor in presidential politics. Local campaigns collect lots of data as well, and that data needs to be secured. Marketpalce Tech host Molly Wood spoke with Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams about what kinds of information smaller campaigns have. 

Updated at 12:38 p.m. ET

Solidarity marches to protest anti-Semitism are planned in Berlin and other German cities on Wednesday after an attack last week on a man wearing a yarmulke sparked widespread outrage.

The attack in Berlin, caught on video, involved a 21-year-old man wearing a Jewish skullcap, also called a kippa, who was suddenly attacked by an assailant calling out "Yahudi!" — the Arabic word for Jew.

The man being attacked replies, "Jew or no Jew you have to deal with it."

'The Process' And The 76ers

Apr 25, 2018

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12-Year-Old Takes Solo Vacation

Apr 25, 2018

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During intense arguments at the Supreme Court on Wednesday, the justices, by a narrow margin, seemed to be leaning toward upholding the third and current version of the Trump travel ban.

Justice Anthony Kennedy, who is often the deciding vote in closely contested cases, for example, made repeated comments suggesting that the court does not usually second-guess a president's national security decisions — even in the context of an immigration law that bans discrimination based on nationality.

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