NPR News & Stories Via WUNC

An avalanche struck a Japanese ski resort midmorning on Monday, overwhelming a student mountaineering exercise and leaving at least eight people with no vital signs, according to local authorities. Some 40 other students and teachers were injured in the avalanche, which hit the area in Tochigi Prefecture, nearly 100 miles north of Tokyo.

As the BBC notes, Japanese rescue officials typically will not pronounce victims dead until they receive confirmation from doctors at a hospital.

Your internet data may be up for sale

Mar 27, 2017
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Molly Wood

Last week, the United States Senate quietly voted to repeal the Federal Communications Commission's broadband privacy rules. These rules would have given consumers the power to choose how to share personal data that gets collected by internet service providers. For example, data about what websites you visit. The bill goes to the House of Representatives for a vote on Tuesday. If it passes the House, it goes off to President Donald Trump, who is expected to sign it.

Before plate tectonics, the Earth may have been covered by one giant shell

Mar 27, 2017
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USGS

The Earth’s outer layer is split into slabs, called tectonic plates. As the plates slide across the Earth’s surface, their constant, often violent interactions with one another create volcanoes, earthquakes, rifts and mountain ranges. But the Earth may not always have been shaped this way.

In the spring of my senior year of high school, I took daily trips to the mailbox. It might have been the only time in my life when I knew for a fact that any day, letters with my name on them would appear in the mailbox from colleges that had read through my hopeful applications.

Why markets worldwide are down following Congress's failure to repeal and replace Obamacare. Then, a new survey reveals that credit card holders are generally successful when they ask to negotiate rates and waive fees. And Sabri Ben-Achour interviews journalist Jason Koebler about why farmers are fighting John Deere policies by hacking their

Overcoats' music has been undeniable for me from the first time I saw the duo perform. The deep friendship between Hana Elion and JJ Mitchell comes across in their vibrant harmonies and the bountiful dance parties that pop up as they go.

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REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Over President Donald Trump's first 100 days, we're asking him questions that our audience wants answers to. Join the project by tweeting this question to @realDonaldTrump with the hashtag #100Days100Qs.

#64. @realDonaldTrump President Trump, what are your plans for the Office of Global Women's Issues? #100Days100Qs

Leaders of the large and unprecedented pro-democracy protests that roiled parts of Hong Kong in 2014 have been told to report to police on charges of causing a public nuisance, in an apparent crackdown that comes one day after Hong Kong selected a new chief executive.

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Marketplace

What now? That's the question after House Republicans last week failed to pass a repeal-and-replacement bill for the Affordable Care Act. We take a look at what might happen to state and federal insurance exchanges in 2018. We also re-visit the question "Can the government really act like a business?" President Trump seems to think so. Jared Kushner, his son-in-law, will head a new department with an old concept: use data-driven business practices and apply them to government.

President Trump was downright low energy.

The look on his face, as he meandered through unscripted remarks Friday after the defeat of the Republican health care plan he supported, told the story. The unusually subdued Trump called the loss a "learning experience." Then he seemed to shrug it all off and said he was moving on.

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Sabri Ben-Achour

In some rural parts of the U.S., there is a bitter divide emerging between farmers and a tractor company over software. Tractors these days are not your grandpa's tractors — they come with sophisticated software. Farmers say this technology locks them out of their equipment so they can't fix it themselves, which is why they’re jailbreaking their tractors using bootleg software.

NYC’s 'Fearless Girl' will keep standing on Wall Street

Mar 27, 2017
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Jana Kasperkevic

The faceoff between the Wall Street bull and the “Fearless Girl” will continue.

The 4-foot-tall, pony-tailed statue of a girl with arms akimbo was supposed to be removed on April 2, but New York city officials announced on Sunday that it was extending its stay through February of next year.

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Micaela Delgado is a beautiful dark-eyed baby girl with a ready smile. She's 8 months old. She's one of more than 1,000 babies already born in Puerto Rico to mothers with Zika.

Her mother, Yalieth Gonzalez, 22, says despite all her worries, so far Micaela's development appears normal. "She's very active, she's up on her own now, she's crawling," Gonzalez says. "She's saying, 'mama' and 'papa' already. She's a very happy baby. She has a lot of energy." But Gonzalez is on alert for signs of trouble.

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A holy man, recently installed as the chief minister of India's largest state, is stirring things up. A meat crackdown began within 48 hours of Yogi Adityanath assuming office. Critics say this has antagonized the country's largest religious minority: its Muslims.

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Editor's Note: This story has been edited throughout. An earlier version was inadvertently published.

Hossein Mahrammi, who helped U.S. development authorities in Kabul rebuild his war-torn country, expected a warm welcome when he arrived in the United States this month.

The economist had planned to stay in Afghanistan but left because he feared for himself and his family. One by one, he saw that his colleagues were assaulted or killed because they worked with Americans.

Breast-feeding has many known health benefits, but there's still debate about how it may influence kids' behavior and intelligence.

Now, a new study published in Pediatrics finds that children who are breast-fed for at least six months as babies have less hyperactive behavior by age 3 compared with kids who weren't breast-fed.

But the study also finds that breast-feeding doesn't necessarily lead to a cognitive boost.

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Good morning. I'm David Greene. It is not my goal to put you to sleep. But...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Press 1 to hear the relaxing sounds of the ocean.

GREENE: Ah, the ocean.

(SOUNDBITE OF GULLS SQUAKWING)

When Kathleen Muldoon had her second child everything was going smoothly. The delivery was short, the baby's APGAR score was good and he was a healthy weight.

"Everyone said he was amazing," says Muldoon.

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It's a perennial debate in American education: Do kids learn best when they're sitting in rows at their desks? Or moving around, exploring on their own?

Back in the 1960s and '70s, that debate led to a brand new school design: Small classrooms were out. Wide-open spaces were in. The Open Education movement was born.

Across the U.S., schools were designed and built along these new ideas, with a new approach to the learning that would take place inside them.

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