NPR News & Stories From WUNC

New Orleans Braces For Isaac

Aug 28, 2012

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Part 2 of TED Radio Hour episode Africa: The Next Chapter. Watch Patrick Awuah's full talk, On Educating Leaders, at TED.com.

About Patrick Awuah's Talk

Is Foreign Aid Harming Africa?

Jun 29, 2012

Part 3 of TED Radio Hour episode Africa: The Next Chapter. You can watch Andrew Mwenda's full Ted Talk, A New Look At Africa, at TED.com.

About Andrew Mwenda's Talk

For most young people, "hollerin'," now often shortened to "hollaaa," is part of pop culture slang. But once upon a time, hollerin' brought to mind a different culture.

Drive an hour south of Raleigh, N.C., and you might stumble upon Spivey's Corner. It's a tiny hamlet, not really a town — one stoplight, no post office.

Tinsel Tales: NPR Christmas Stories

Dec 22, 2011

Christmas is a time of traditions, and over the years, NPR has created a few traditions of its own. In this hour-long special: Wistfulness, joy, doubt, hope, all the emotions we feel at this time of year, all summoned up in memorable stories from the NPR broadcast archives.

David Sedaris, Bailey White, John Henry Faulk — these and other NPR voices, past and present, tell stories of the season. It may be you'll remember these tales fondly, or it may be you'll fall in love with them for the first time.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

Here's one good old broadcast tradition that's still going on. Every Saturday morning, musicians in Mount Airy, North Carolina, gather at a historic downtown theater. They've been doing it since 1948 when AM radio station WPAQ began airing a live show called the "Merry-Go-Round."

The program features regional old-time and bluegrass music. And today, the "Merry-Go-Round" is one of the last shows of its kind on the airwaves.

From North Carolina Public Radio, Jessica Jones reports.

Pronouncing The 'R' In Camp Lejeune

Jul 16, 2010

Transcript

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

There's a long-running debate at a Marine Corps base in North Carolina. We're not talking about the debate over the policy in Afghanistan. It's about pronunciation.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

Just the kind of thing that ends up absorbing precious minutes of our day here in the newsroom.

NORRIS: The big question in that debate is this: Do you say Camp Lejeune or Camp Lejerne(ph)?

Here's Catherine Welch, from member station WHQR, to sort this all out.

Fifty years ago, on Feb. 1, four black college students sat down at a whites-only Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, N.C. The "Greensboro Four," along with friends and supporters, returned to the counter every day for six months until the lunch counter was desegregated.

Their determination to resist Jim Crow laws inspired thousands of peaceful sit-ins and helped to end official segregation in the South. On Monday, in the same building that once housed the Woolworth's store, the International Civil Rights Center & Museum opens.

The movement that led to sit-ins all over the country and contributed to the dissolution of segregation began with four college students in Greensboro, N.C. On the 50th anniversary of the Woolworth's sit-ins, this timeline highlights their exponential growth and impact on segregation law.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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