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Cherokee playwright Mary Kathryn Nagle is fighting for the rights of Native Americans both onstage and off. 

That emoji you just tweeted could determine the next ad you see

Feb 16, 2018

What do egglplant, fire and the number 100 all have in common? They're all emojis that have twisted and evolved in meaning.

As those little digital images change how we communicate, they've also transformed how advertisers track our interests.

Since 2016, Twitter has sold data of people’s emoji use to advertisers, allowing companies to send people specific ads based on the emojis they tweet.

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What can AI learn from non-Western philosophies?

Feb 16, 2018

As autonomous and intelligent systems become more and more ubiquitous and sophisticated, developers and users face an important question: How do we ensure that when these technologies are in a position to make a decision, they make the right decision — the ethically right decision?

It's a complicated question. And there’s not one single right answer. 

But there is one thing that people who work in the budding field of AI ethics seem to agree on.

Yoon Ji-young lays down slabs of fatty pork belly that sizzle and crackle as they touch the burning hot grill atop her kitchen table. Four months into her first pregnancy, the 35-year-old says she’s been caught off guard by the “weird” desires she’s had for meaty dishes that she typically avoids.

“I’ve had strong cravings for junk food, like hamburgers and fried chicken,” she says. “I don’t even like fried chicken at all!” 

How Chinese media covers US gun violence

Feb 16, 2018

Chinese state media often hypes American problems and foibles to redirect attention away from China’s poor human rights records. And yet, when it comes to American gun violence, it takes a measured tone.

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Cameron Kasky is angry. He's angry because when he goes back to school, 17 people won't be there, 17 people who were killed in a mass shooting in Florida on Wednesday. And Cameron Kasky is with us now. Welcome.

Fresh off its Golden Globe award for best animation, the Disney-Pixar movie Coco is a favorite to win an Oscar next month.

It's a sweet story of a small boy, Miguel, who dreams of becoming a musician despite his parents' objections. On the way, he finds family, tradition and a magnificent white guitar, encrusted with pearl details and a black skull.

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Cameron Kasky is one of many people calling for increased restrictions on guns. Meanwhile, many Republicans, including Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, say that should not be the immediate response.

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NPR national security editor Phil Ewing (@philewing) joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to discuss a federal grand jury indicting 13 Russian nationals for interfering with the 2016 U.S. election.

How One New York School Thwarted An Attack

Feb 16, 2018

Following the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 people dead, many are asking what could have been done to stop it from happening.

Some attacks have been thwarted before they were carried out. Here & Now‘s Robin Young finds out about one such instance in New York from Ruschell Boone (@RuschellBoone), a reporter with NY1.

Do corporate wellness programs work?

Feb 16, 2018

Robert Granger stands on a thick, blue, padded mat and stares up a rock-climbing wall covered in rainbow-colored, hand-and-foot holds. It looks like like someone threw a handful of skittles at the wall and they stuck.

“It’s a really good place to unwind and think about something else,” he said, during breaks between ascents. “The nice thing is you have to use your mind, as well as body, doing this. It takes your mind off anything else.” 

What does the gender wage gap sound like?

Feb 16, 2018

The U.S. lags behind Iceland, Rwanda and Nicaragua when it comes to pay equity for women. That's according to a recent report from the World Economic Forum. In the U.S., on average, women earn 80 cents for every dollar men make, according to the Department of Labor. Why? There are more men work in higher-earning professions. But sometimes men just get paid more. When women find out a male colleague is making more money for the exact same job, it can spur them to action.

Who Was Marjory Stoneman Douglas?

Feb 16, 2018

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02/16/2018: Money, ethics and emojis

Feb 16, 2018

This week: A story about the financial holdings of the Trump administration, our national ethics laws and whether these things matter. Plus, what the gender wage gap sounds like, a chat with the designer of Michelle Obama’s portrait dress and a story about how advertisers track every emoji we use. Also, why we should all care about the country’s debt. 

The Commerce Department on Friday recommended setting strict new limits on imported steel and aluminum, saying action is needed to shore up U.S. industries vital to national security.

The recommendations, made after a 10-month investigation, are based on a seldom-used statute that aims to protect critical defense-related businesses.

This week, former First Lady Michelle Obama's official portrait was unveiled to much oohing and ahing at the National Portrait Gallery.

"I'm also thinking about all of the young people, particularly girls and girls of color, who in years ahead will come to this place, and they will look up, and they will see an image of someone who looks like them hanging on the wall of this great American institution," Obama said at the presentation.

Things turned out a little differently though. That's how we'll start today's episode, reflecting on the week in deficits, inflation and immigration. Then we examine the growing trend of online retailers expanding to brick-and-mortar stores. Amazon's doing it, and now Warby Parker announced plans to bring its number of stores to about 100 by the end of the year. Plus, what you need to know about esports.

There are a lot of reminders of the past in the northern English city of Hull. Defunct deep-sea trawlers and cavernous warehouses recall the city’s history as the hub of England’s fishing industry.

Today, though, Hull is also a vision of the future — a factory churning out massive wind turbine blades, each the size of a giant sequoia tree, and built almost entirely by hand out of balsa wood, fiberglass and gleaming white paint.

The German company Siemens recently set up shop here to supply the growing fleet of wind farms off the coast of the UK.

Pita Taufatofua, who lit the Internet on fire with his coconut-oiled, shirtless walk as Tonga's flag-bearer during the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics opening ceremony, had two goals for his cross-country skiing event on Friday.

They were not lofty — but that makes sense for a man who has tried skiing on snow for only three months.

"First step, finish before they turn the lights off," the 34-year-old told reporters. "Don't ski into a tree, that's No. 2."

Remembering Cabaret Star Wesla Whitfield

Feb 16, 2018

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