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Walk, Don't Run

May 18, 2018

In this final round, every answer contains one of three natural human gaits — "walk," "skip," or "run."

Heard on Diane Guerrero: Most Likely To Be Superlative.

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School Shooting Reported Near Houston

May 18, 2018

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The Food and Drug Administration has approved a first-of-its-kind drug that reduces the number of migraines among people prone to these sometimes crippling headaches.

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Updated at 10:45 p.m. ET

At least 10 people were killed when a gunman opened fire inside a small-town Texas high school, in what Gov. Greg Abbott called "probably the worst disaster ever to strike this community."

Ten others were wounded in the morning attack at Santa Fe High School.

Updated at 6:21 p.m. ET

The House rejected a $867 billion farm bill on Friday — after spending days negotiating with key conservatives in an attempt to pass the bill without the support of Democrats.

The vote was 198-213. Every Democrat voted against the measure, as did 30 Republicans. Many of the GOP lawmakers are members of the House Freedom Caucus and voted no after failing to get concessions on spending and a future vote on immigration in exchange for their support.

The visuals were stark: On Monday, as US officials opened the new US embassy in Jerusalem, thousands of Palestinians were injured at the Israel-Gaza border fence as dark smoke filled the sky.

Israeli forces killed 60 Palestinians on Monday, according to the Palestinian Health Ministry, and injured more than 2,200 by gunfire or tear gas. The violence continued Tuesday as Israeli forces killed one man, while thousands of Palestinians turned out for funerals.

Chimps owned by the National Institutes of Health should be moved from research facilities to retirement sanctuaries unless that relocation is "extremely likely" to shorten their lives, a report issued Friday says.

"Chimpanzees should be relocated to the federal sanctuary system unless relocation would place the chimpanzee's life, safety, and welfare at extreme risk," says the report from a working group convened by the NIH to examine the safety of transferring chimps to retirement homes.

A new survey out this morning of mobility in the American workforce finds that one in four job applicants would move to a new city for a new job, a higher salary or better career opportunities. The online employment site Glassdoor found that younger workers and men were more likely than others to relocate to a new metro area, especially those in software engineering, developers and data scientists. And where are they moving to?

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Land accounts for 80 percent of farm assets according to the Department of Agriculture. So farmers are using their land as collateral to face low commodity prices, but the amount of production that farmers need to service their debt is rising. 

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It's tough out there for farmers

May 18, 2018

(U.S. Edition) The U.S. and China are hard at it to work out a trade agreement. One potential idea floating around: a $200 billion trade surplus package from Beijing. We'll chat with a former Treasury Department official about how big this offer is in the grand scheme of things. Afterwards, we'll look at the financial troubles many farms in the U.S. are facing. Many are using their land as collateral against loans to keep operating. (05/18/2018)

There was exactly one sink in my first New York apartment, which also featured a bathtub in the kitchen and a toilet tucked away by itself in a room smaller than many closets. It was fine for a person living alone, but when my roommates returned, well, the dishes — from which there was never an escape — piled up fast.

China drops U.S. trade probe

May 18, 2018

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... There are signs that the frosty trade relationship between the U.S. and China is thawing. Beijing has dropped a sanctions probe into American sorghum imports. But is this olive branch a sign that China will fulfill a promise to open its economy? We ask trade expert David Collins. Then, the bunting is out, the weather looks clear. Yes, it's finally here. Prince Harry will marry Meghan Markle this weekend at Windsor Castle. We speak to some of those involved in the celebrations.

Sergei Skripal, the former Russian spy and British double agent who was poisoned in England, has been discharged from a Salisbury hospital more than two months after he was exposed to a lethal nerve agent developed by Russia.

"It is fantastic news that Sergei Skripal is well enough to leave Salisbury District Hospital," said Cara Charles-Barks, chief executive of Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust.

Hospital officials say Skripal, 66, will continue his recovery elsewhere. He was found slumped over on a bench on March 4 along with his 33-year-old daughter, Yulia Skripal.

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President Trump once called the North Atlantic Treaty Organization obsolete, but the rhetoric Trump used on the campaign trail and in the early months of his presidency appears to have evolved. This was the president at the White House yesterday.

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The best personal finance books for recent college grads

May 18, 2018

If you’re getting your college grad a gift of money, you might want to include a book on how to put that present to good use. Financial planning might not be a priority — 70 percent of grads are finishing school with significant debt. But with U.S. employers adding an average of 200,000 jobs per month in 2018, your grad could be working — and doing some financial planning — soon.

Here are some personal finance books for grads recommended by Marketplace senior economics contributor Chris Farrell, keeping in mind economics and English majors alike.  

A man who fired shots in the lobby of the Trump National Doral Golf Club in South Florida and shouted statements against President Trump is in custody after he was wounded by police gunfire.

Police say that after sneaking into the club through a rear entrance, the man, identified as Jonathon Oddi, 42, triggered a fire alarm. He apparently pointed a handgun at people at the hotel but did not shoot anyone. People who had been in the lobby were able to flee.

The Senate voted earlier this week to overturn the Federal Communications Commission’s decision to roll back net neutrality rules. But in order for the FCC’s decision to be reversed, a similar vote would have to pass the house and be signed by the president. But the vote did accomplish one big thing: It reminded politicians that consumers care about net neutrality and support some kind of regulation on big telecom companies. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood spoke with Brian Fung of the Washington Post about what he learned from senators after the vote.  

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So how exactly can President Trump reassure Kim Jong Un that he will not be overthrown?

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Good morning. I'm David Greene. Wasn't it the movie "2001: A Space Odyssey" when we became afraid technology could outsmart us?

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY")

DOUGLAS RAIN: (As HAL 9000) I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that.

Trade talks are going on in Washington, D.C., between China and the U.S., in an effort to avert an all-out trade war. Among those closely watching are winemakers in California.

Another fissure has emerged on Hawaii's Kilauea volcano, bringing the total to 21, as authorities handed out protective masks and local officials warned that toxic ash and sulfur dioxide gas are the biggest health concerns for people near the mountain.

The new fissure was discovered at Leilani Estates, the neighborhood in Puna where the first new fissures were seen this month when Kilauea suddenly became more active. Since then, more than two dozen homes have been inundated in slow-moving lava flows.

Did our lack of trust in Big Cable sway the net neutrality vote?

May 18, 2018

The Senate voted earlier this week to overturn the Federal Communications Commission’s decision to roll back net neutrality rules. But in order for the FCC’s decision to be reversed, a similar vote would have to pass the house and be signed by the president. But the vote did accomplish one big thing: It reminded politicians that consumers care about net neutrality and support some kind of regulation on big telecom companies. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood spoke with Brian Fung of the Washington Post about what he learned from senators after the vote.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Britain's Royal Wedding Is 1 Day Away

May 18, 2018

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The last time Mary Buchzeiger was in Washington, D.C., she was a 13-year-old on an eighth-grade trip.

This week, as the head of a small company that supplies parts to automakers, she joined other business leaders in the nation's capital to talk about President Trump's proposed tariffs aimed at China.

"I'm not a political person," she says as sips coffee in a cafe a couple of blocks from the U.S. Capitol. But she says she fears the tariffs could destroy her company.

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