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5:11 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Stockton Bankruptcy Case Defers Decision On Pensions

An aging sign at City Hall in Stockton, Calif. A judge has ruled that the city is eligible for federal bankruptcy protection.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 8:41 pm

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Christopher Klein ruled Monday on the most important question facing Stockton, Calif. — whether it could enter into federal bankruptcy protection.

Klein agreed that the city is, in fact, broke.

But he didn't decide the question of whether the city must renegotiate its pension obligations, as some of its creditors had hoped.

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The Two-Way
4:55 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Hard Times At Apple: Apology To China Comes As Stock Slides

People line up to enter a newly-opened Apple Store in Wangfujing shopping district in Beijing.
Andy Wong AP

In an unusual move on Monday, Apple CEO Tim Cook apologized to Chinese customers over the company's warranty policy and vowed to improve customer service in the country.

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The Two-Way
4:52 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Star Of MTV's 'Buckwild' Found Dead

One of the stars of the MTV reality show Buckwild was found dead Monday in an SUV along with his uncle and a third, as-yet-unidentified person, the Kanawha County, W.Va., Sheriff's Office said.

The bodies of Shain Gandee, 21, his uncle David Gandee, 48, and the third person were inside a 1984 Ford Bronco in a wooded area near Sissonville, W.Va., about 15 miles from Charleston. A statement from the Sheriff's Office said there was no sign of foul play.

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NPR Story
4:44 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Some Hope New Pope Will Promote Greater Role For Women In The Church

A group of American nuns and Catholic women has traveled to Rome for a pilgrimage to the sites where there are traces on frescoes, mosaics, and more that show how women played an important role in the church in the early centuries of Christianity.

It's All Politics
4:29 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Immigration Overhaul Inches Forward, But Big Hurdles Remain

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., says talk of a bipartisan agreement among eight key senators working on immigration law is "premature."
Susan Walsh AP

It's still far too early to know whether Congress will actually be able to achieve a comprehensive overhaul to the nation's immigration laws. All that's certain at this stage is that lawmakers on both sides of the partisan divide, and in both chambers, continue to act as though they think they can.

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The Two-Way
4:11 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Judge's Ruling Makes Stockton, Calif., Most Populous City To Enter Bankruptcy

A judge accepted the California city of Stockton's bankruptcy application on Monday, making it the most populous city in the nation to enter bankruptcy.
Ben Margot AP

Stockton, Calif., is now the most populous city in the U.S. to enter bankruptcy, after a decision by U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Christopher Klein on Monday.

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It's All Politics
3:42 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Opposition Research Boot Camp: Learning To Dig For Political Dirt

Opposition research is becoming a given in politics, sometimes even at the local level.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 8:29 pm

Opposition research exists mostly in the political shadows. So perhaps it's fitting that this boot camp is in an generic conference room in a generic airport hotel outside of Washington, D.C.

It's run by private investigator Larry Zilliox, who specializes in opposition research. He allowed me to attend a session, but not to take pictures.

Zilliox is cagey about his clients: "As a general rule, it suits me best not to comment on who I've worked for. Everybody is better off that way."

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Shots - Health News
3:41 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Mining Books To Map Emotions Through A Century

When anthropologists tallied the use of emotional words through a century of literature, they included many books without clear emotional content — technical manuals, for example, and automotive repair guides.
Steve Debenport iStockphotography

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 10:18 am

Were people happier in the 1950s than they are today? Or were they more frustrated, repressed and sad?

To find out, you'd have to compare the emotions of one generation to another. British anthropologists think they may have found the answer — embedded in literature.

Several years ago, more or less on a lark, a group of researchers from England used a computer program to analyze the emotional content of books from every year of the 20th century — close to a billion words in millions of books.

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The Two-Way
3:00 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Expert: Recent Attacks On Justice Community 'Really Unprecedented'

The home of Kaufman County District Attorney Mike McLelland is surrounded by police tape in Forney, Texas, on Monday. Authorities launched a massive investigation into the weekend killings of McLelland and his wife.
Tim Sharp Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 3:32 pm

Two county prosecutors fatally shot in Texas. Colorado's top prison official gunned down. And a dozen more members of the U.S. justice community — ranging from police to judges — victims of targeted killings since the beginning of the decade.

What's going on?

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The Two-Way
2:55 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Arizona Rep: Gay Son Hasn't Changed View On Same-Sex Marriage

Rep. Matt Salmon, R-Ariz., being interviewed on Phoenix news station 3TV. Salmon, whose son is openly gay, says he remains opposed to same-sex marriage.
Screengrab via 3TV

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 2:17 pm

In a weekend interview, Rep. Matt Salmon, a Republican of Arizona, told a local news station that his openly gay son has not changed his position on same-sex marriage.

As you might recall, it was big news when another Republican, Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio, said his son's homosexuality inspired him to change his position on same-sex marriage.

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