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How White Cane Day Makes A Difference

22 hours ago

On an early Sunday morning, before the sun has even risen, Zaw Lin Htun walks down the middle of what is usually one of the busiest roads in downtown Yangon, the capital of Myanmar.

He strolls past a golden pagoda. He taps his white cane back and forth on the pavement, making sure to avoid the potholes, loose electrical wires and debris that fill the street and sidewalks.

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The National Sleep Foundation recommends an average of eight hours of sleep per night for adults, but sleep scientist Matthew Walker says that too many people are falling short of the mark.

"Human beings are the only species that deliberately deprive themselves of sleep for no apparent gain," Walker says. "Many people walk through their lives in an underslept state, not realizing it."

Over the past week, Northern California has seen some horrific fires blaze across its neighborhoods. One of the remarkable things about those fires, in addition to their speed and the scale of the destruction, is what buildings burned and where those buildings were.

The Tubbs Fire, which hit the city of Santa Rosa, has burned more than 35,000 acres. It was 70 percent contained as of today, according to Cal Fire.

This archipelago in the Gulf of Alaska is home to one of the busiest commercial fishing ports in the country. Inside the Ocean Beauty seafood plant in Kodiak, where a maze of conveyer belts carry gutted salmon past workers in hairnets and gloves, manager James Turner ticks off everything that contributes to his monthly electricity bill: canning machines, pressure cookers, freezers lights.

"We use a lot of power here," he says.

Brain imaging studies have a diversity problem.

That's what researchers concluded after they re-analyzed data from a large study that used MRI to measure brain development in children from 3 to 18.

Like most brain imaging studies of children, this one included a disproportionate number of kids who have highly educated parents with relatively high household incomes, the team reported Thursday in the journal Nature Communications.

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

Not much of significance has gotten through this Congress, despite the House, Senate and White House all being controlled by the same party — Republicans.

President Trump says, don't blame him.

"We're not getting the job done. And I'm not going to blame myself, I'll be honest," Trump said during short remarks in a Cabinet meeting.

He then shifted away from "we" to "they."

"They're not getting the job done," the president said of Congress.

Why people stay friends with their rapists

Oct 16, 2017
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Kevork Djansezian

Since The New York Times reported about how Harvey Weinstein has been paying off accusations of sexual harassment for decades, more and more women have been coming forward to report abuse, in some cases from years ago.

Writer, journalist and playwright, Natalia Antonova, thinks she understands why some have kept silent for so long.

We’re the biggest culprits behind wildfires. Now what?

Oct 16, 2017
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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/usfwssoutheast/4971832860/">Josh O&rsquo;Connor/USFWS</a>. <a href="https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/">Public domain</a>. Image cropped.

In the United States, this year’s wildfire season has been wild, to say the least. Roughly 50,000 fires have scorched more than 8.5 million acres across the country, hitting the Pacific Northwest, California and Montana particularly hard.

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

The remnants of post-tropical cyclone Ophelia slammed parts of Ireland with wind gusts of more than 90 miles per hour, reportedly causing the deaths of at least three people and bringing strange red skies to the U.K.

Ira Belgrade had been a Hollywood talent manager for decades when his wife, who was also his business partner, died suddenly from Lyme disease.  

“I fell apart, my business fell apart,” Belgrade said.  “How was I going to tell my 2 1/2-year-old, 'Now we’ve got to move, you can’t have that bedroom anymore'?

A federal jury has convicted Ahmad Khan Rahimi of all counts related to last fall's bombing in New York City's Chelsea neighborhood and two related plots. One device injured 30 people in Chelsea; another failed to explode in Manhattan — but a third went off at a Marine Corps charity race at the Jersey Shore.

Rahimi "now faces a mandatory sentence of life in prison," says acting U.S. Attorney Joon H. Kim, who said the bomber had "attacked our country and our way of life" after being inspired by ISIS and al-Qaida.

10/16/2017: Preventing distracted driving

Oct 16, 2017

(Markets Edition) The Federal Reserve still wants another interest rate hike or two. Julia Coronado, founder of MacroPolicy Perspectives, joined us to discuss why Fed Chair Janet Yellen has been pushing for them. Afterwards, we'll look at the issue of distracted driving, which causes more than 3,000 deaths a year. We now have software that will allow police to scan a driver's phone for activity.

They had me at "parmesan pepper bread." There are plenty of cookbooks that delight the eyes with beautiful photography, but the new self-titled cookbook from Zingerman's Bakehouse (and the first proper cookbook from the lauded Zingerman's 10 businesses) in Ann Arbor, Mich., is not a coffee table book.

Written by bakery co-owners Amy Emberling and Frank Carollo, the book does have some mouthwatering images, but its real appeal lies in the no-nonsense recipes that seem like they're just an oven-preheat away from appearing warm and fresh in your kitchen.

537,000: That's the number of Rohingya who have fled Myanmar for Bangladesh in the past seven weeks, according to the U.N.

It's the largest migration of people in Asia in decades. The Rohingya are fleeing a campaign of terror by the Myanmar military and Buddhist vigilantes, something the U.N. has called the world's "fastest developing refugee emergency" and a "textbook example of ethnic cleansing."

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was held by the Taliban after leaving his base in Afghanistan in 2009, has pleaded guilty to desertion and misbehavior before the enemy. Bergdahl was freed in 2014 in exchange for five Taliban detainees.

Bergdahl, a native of Idaho, pleaded guilty before the military judge in the case, Army Col. Jeffery R. Nance, at a hearing at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Monday, according to The Associated Press.

For the first time, scientists have caught two neutron stars in the act of colliding, revealing that these strange smashups are the source of heavy elements such as gold and platinum.

Colin Kaepernick says the NFL colluded against him

Oct 16, 2017

Colin Kaepernick — the football player who started kneeling during the national anthem to protest social injustice — has now filed a grievance against the NFL, accusing its teams of colluding against him.

He opted out of his contract with the San Francisco 49ers in March, and no team has signed him despite a strong season last year. That's led to speculation in the sports community that he’s been blackballed by the NFL because of his political activism.

Updated at 2:30 a.m. ET Tuesday

Iraqi forces took over key positions in the Kurdish city of Kirkuk and nearby oil-rich areas on Monday, after Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said he ordered troops sent in because Iraq is in danger of "partition," citing the Kurdish independence movement.

Abadi also ordered the Kurdish flag to be taken down and the Iraqi flag to be raised in disputed areas — and that's what happened at the governor's office and in other official buildings.

(U.S. Edition) Colin Kaepernick — the football player who began kneeling during the national anthem to protest social injustice — has filed a grievance against the NFL, claiming that the league's teams colluded to keep him from getting a new contract. On today's show, we'll look at what the league's collective bargaining agreement means for his case. Afterwards, we'll discuss Alibaba's plan to double its spending on research and development to $15 billion over the next three years.

In 2011, Ben Lieberman got the call every parent dreads. His college age son had been in a car accident and later diedLieberman was told the driver fell asleep at the wheel. But the accident happened during rush hour – on a windy road. So Lieberman wondered if the driver had been texting but says he was shocked at how difficult that can be to investigate. 

“I learned the hard way that there’s really no system in place right now," he said. 

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The winds in northern California remained mostly calm over the weekend, allowing firefighters to finally get the upper hand in the battle against at least 15 wildfires. Here is Cal Fire Incident Commander Bret Gouvea.

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Chinese internet giant Alibaba is taking a big step toward competing globally. It plans to more than double spending on research and development to $15 billion over the next three years, and will open labs in seven cities around the world, including in Russia, Singapore and in the U.S. But can its dominance of the Chinese market translate into international success?

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. In Mississippi, a guy reported a mountain lion on the loose. FOX 13 went to investigate. Their on-camera reporter was pointing to the spot where the animal had been seen.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "FOX 13 NEWS")

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10/16/2017: European investors weigh new risks

Oct 16, 2017

(Global Edition) From the BBC's World Service ... European investors are waking up to the return of political risk -- another showdown over Catalonia is playing out and Austria has elected the world’s youngest leader, with fears over immigration helping bring Sebastian Kurz to power. We examine the implications for Europe. Tensions have flared in the oil rich region around Kirkuk, with Iraqi forces saying they have captured the disputed city from Kurdish fighters. But how crucial is the area to the world’s oil supply?

Microsoft recently announced that it’s doing away with its Windows Phone operating system. That basically leaves consumers with two options: iPhone or Android. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood talks with Julie Ask, a principal analyst at Forrester Research, about how the smartphone industry got here and what it would take for a third player to enter the market. 

How Apple and Android took over the smartphone market

Oct 16, 2017

Microsoft recently confirmed that its Windows Phone operating system is over and done. That means when it's time to buy a new smartphone, there are basically only two operating systems a consumer can choose from: iOS or Android.

The two have a sort of duopoly on the smartphone market.

Apple released the first iPhone in 2007, and a little over a year later Google unveiled its first Android phone. The big smartphone battle has mostly remained between the two platforms ever since. It might simply be because they were the biggest initial innovators in the market.

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