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Updated at 3:05 p.m. ET

Tech entrepreneur Elon Musk has apologized for his part in a spat with a British diver involved in the rescue of 12 boys and their soccer coach trapped in a flooded cave in Thailand. Musk had tweeted a personal attack on Vern Unsworth, calling him a pedophile after the diver dismissed Musk's offer of help with a vulgar comment.

Updated at 3:50 p.m. ET

A federal magistrate judge ordered Wednesday that a Russian woman charged with being a Russian agent in the United States must be jailed ahead of her trial after prosecutors said she was a flight risk.

The woman, Maria Butina, has been in regular contact with Russian intelligence, the Justice Department says, and she attempted to offer sex in exchange for a position with an organization she targeted.

Got a cold or the flu? Think twice about antibiotics

Jul 18, 2018

A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine has found urgent care centers are prescribing antibiotics to nearly half of patients with colds or the flu. Generally antibiotics are effective against bacterial infections like pneumonia. Antibiotics do not work to treat viral infections, like the flu and colds.

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Ethiopia's "bird of peace" has landed.

After two decades of bloody conflict, Ethiopia and Eritrea have been repairing their relationship with remarkable speed following a peace deal reached last week. On Wednesday, a new milestone was marked — the first commercial flight between the neighboring countries in 20 years.

When antibiotics can become a problem

Jul 18, 2018

(Markets Edition) The construction of new homes in the U.S. plunged in June, according to data out today. We'll chat with Susan Schmidt, senior vice president at Westwood Holdings Group, about how much of a cause for concern this is. Afterwards, we'll discuss a new study that finds urgent care centers are prescribing antiobiotics to nearly half of patients with colds or the flu, which could actually end up harming patients.

The days of plastic straws are drawing shorter.

Marriott International on Wednesday became the latest big company to announce it will stop using plastic straws, saying it would remove them from its more than 6,500 properties by next July. The giant hotel chain said it will stop offering plastic stirrers, too.

The California Lottery is breaking sales records. This year, revenues will soar to an estimated $6.9 billion. The recent boom has been fueled by a wave of gigantic jackpots. Newer games like Powerball and a $30 scratch ticket offer huge prizes, and California's lottery players have responded by gambling more and more. Surging revenue should be good news for the state's schools, the lottery's only beneficiary.

Last week, comedian Mohammad “Mo” Amer sat next to Eric Trump on a flight. He told him: "I’m not going to get a Muslim ID number. Bullshit. I’m not doing it."

Perhaps, for some Muslims in America, his response provided some relief. According to Amer, President-elect Donald Trump's third child said:

“That’s not gonna happen. Come on man, you can’t believe everything that you read.”

The order you were born can have an impact on how successful you are in life, according to Sandra Black, an economics professor at the University of Texas at Austin.

In her research, Black has found that first-born children tend to do better than their younger siblings when it comes to education and earnings. After the first-born, there's a declining pattern by birth order, with the second-born doing "a little bit worse than the first-born" and so on, she says. 

Iram Sabah, mother of two, is terrified by messages her family has been receiving on their smartphones.

Her husband recently was forwarded a video that shows a child's mutilated body. It's unclear where or when the video is from, or whether it has been doctored. A voice implores people to forward it to others, and to stay vigilant — that kidnappers are on the loose.

Sabah, 27, doesn't know if the video is fake or real. But she's not taking any chances.

At 8 a.m. on a sunny morning in April, people are sweeping the hilly streets of Kigali, the capital of Rwanda, with straw brooms and picking up stray bits of litter.

The roads are empty of cars, and all vehicles and shops are shuttered here — and across the country.

This is "Umuganda," a community cleanup held on the last Saturday of every month. It's one reason that Rwanda is renowned in Africa for its cleanliness.

(U.S. Edition) The European Commission is set to fine Google a record $5 billion over antitrust practices related to its Android system. We'll explore what this ruling could mean for the way Google operates. Afterwards, we'll discuss why MGM is planning to sue some of the victims in last October's mass shooting in Las Vegas. Plus: We'll explore the economics of birth order with economics professor Sandra Black. She talked to us about evidence that shows first-born children tend to better when it comes to earnings and education.

The European Union’s antitrust chief has fined Google a record $5 billion for abusing the market dominance of its Android mobile phone operating system.

Thai Boys Speak Out On Cave Rescue

Jul 18, 2018

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Those 12 boys on a soccer team rescued from a cave in Thailand are now going home. The boys and their coach have been recovering in a hospital for the past week. Today, they appeared alongside their doctors for a news conference, hugging friends and apologizing to their parents.

EU Fines Google $5 Billion

Jul 18, 2018

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Updated at 9:15 a.m. ET

The European Commission has fined Google $5 billion for violating the European Union's antitrust rules — specifically, by forcing manufacturers of Android phones to install the Google search app and the Chrome Web browser.

"Google has used Android as a vehicle to cement the dominance of its search engine," Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said in a statement. "These practices have denied rivals the chance to innovate and compete on the merits."

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … European regulators have accused the internet search giant of abusing the dominant position of its Android smartphone system. We explain the implications of the European Union's move. Then, it’s a golden moment for a couple of regions in Africa. Until a few days ago, you couldn’t even make a phone call between Ethiopia and Eritrea. But after two decades of tensions, passenger flights are resuming between the two countries. Finally, where in Africa can you get faster internet speeds than London or Toronto? We reveal all.

Note to readers: this post uses profanity that may offend some.

Four years after Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down over eastern Ukraine by a Russian-supplied surface-to-air missile, families of the 298 victims are still waiting for Russian President Vladimir Putin to explain what happened.

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Alabama Republican Rep. Martha Roby has won a primary runoff against a former Democrat who challenged her over a pledge she made in 2016 not to vote for then-candidate Trump.

Roby, a four-term incumbent representing Alabama's 2nd congressional district in the state's southeast, defeated Bobby Bright, a former "Blue Dog" conservative Democrat who served in Congress until 2011. Bright later switched parties for the run against Roby, whom he tried to paint as insufficiently supportive of the president.

The 12 members of the Wild Boars soccer team and their coach subsisted on water that flooded the cave where they were trapped for two weeks — and they now regard the divers who saved them as family, they said at a news conference on Wednesday after finally leaving a hospital and preparing to return to their homes in northern Thailand.

Your birth order could have an effect on your future earnings

Jul 18, 2018

We’re sorry, younger siblings: there's a good chance your older brother or sister will end up making more than you and perform better in school.

An article by economics professor Sandra Black in the National Bureau of Economic Research highlights the effects that birth order can have on someone's outcome in life. 

How to be a social media star for a living

Jul 18, 2018

Research from Google says 70 percent of teenage YouTube subscribers say they relate more to online creators than traditional celebrities. According to the research firm L2, 70 percent of companies use social media influencers to market products. As part of our series on the creator economy, Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood talked to Troy Solomon, who has more than 45,000 Instagram followers for his verified account A Bear Named Troy. (07/18/2018)

How to be a social media star for a living

Jul 18, 2018

According to numbers from Google Research, 70 percent of teenage YouTube subscribers say they relate to online creators more than traditional celebrities. The research firm L2 says 70 percent of companies use influencers for marketing. That often means deals with social media stars, who fill their fun-looking social feeds with brokered brand placements.

French butchers say they're under threat from militant vegans. And they've asked the French government for protection. What's at stake, say butchers, is not just the right to eat meat — but a way of life.

Didier and Sandrine Tass run their butcher shop on a busy street in Paris' 15th arrondissement. They've been here for 19 years. They know all their customers and discuss growing children and family vacations as they serve them. The Tasses say it's a great livelihood. But these days, the butcher and his wife are nervous about threats from militant vegans.

Rates of anxiety and depression among teens in the U.S. have been rising for years. According to one study, nearly one in three adolescents (ages 13-18) now meets the criteria for an anxiety disorder, and in the latest results from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 32 percent of teens reported persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness.

Eight months pregnant, the drug sales representative wore a wire for the FBI around her bulging belly as she recorded conversations with colleagues at a conference in Chicago. Her code name? Pampers.

Chicago Is Proud To Be Anti-Ketchup

Jul 18, 2018

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