NPR News & Stories Via WUNC

Weekly Wrap: Big Banks, Big Pharma

Sep 23, 2016

Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal talks to Linette Lopez of Business Insider and Felix Salmon of Fusion join for this week's edition of The Weekly Wrap. This week, they talked about Mylan CEO Heather Bresch's poor attempt at defending the EpiPen price hike, the Wells Fargo scam and the rumored sale of Twitter.

Marketplace for Friday, September 23, 2016

Sep 23, 2016
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Gigi Douban

On today's show: how Yahoo protected passwords, how Facebook measured video — and the shortfalls of both. Plus, a chat with one of Donald Trump's trade advisers and a wrap of the week's business news.

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Kim Adams

The presidential campaigns will be spending the weekend preparing for Monday’s presidential debate. The candidates are readying their one liners and prepared rebuttals, and their ad teams are developing strategies to capitalize on what’s expected to be a record audience watching on TV, and following online.

On today's show, we'll talk about why unprotected passwords may not have been included in the Yahoo hack; tomorrow's opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture in D.C.; and the psychology of gas shortages. 

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Reuters/U.S. Air Force/Staff Sgt. Joely Santiago/Handout 

The completion of a US weapons deal with Israel worth $38 billion clears the way for two of Israel's Arab neighbors to buy US fighter jets.

Qatar wants to buy 36 Boeing F-15 fighter jets. Kuwait has been waiting to buy 24 F/A-18E/F Super Hornets. “Those have been on hold for years now,” says journalist Dan De Luce, who follows defense matters for Foreign Policy.

A Complete Guide To Early And Absentee Voting

Sep 23, 2016


What Does Early Voting Data Tell Us?

For those who can't wait to get this election over with, there's good news — early voting is starting.

The bad news: That only applies to you if you live in one of 37 states that offer some kind of early voting (in person, absentee or by mail) without an excuse needed.

More than 1 in 3 people is expected to cast a ballot early this year. On Friday, voters in Minnesota and South Dakota can start turning in absentee ballots. On Saturday, they can do so in Vermont, and ballots will go out in New Jersey.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will be together on stage for the first time on Monday. Both candidates have a lot at stake when they meet at Hofstra University in New York for the first of three presidential debates, this one with moderator Lester Holt of NBC News.

Each has different opportunities and challenges in the debates. Here are four things Clinton will have to think about. We also looked at four things to watch for Trump.

On Monday, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton will face off in their first debate at Hofstra University in New York. In a race this close and with as many as 100 million people watching, the debates present both candidates with chances to seize momentum but potential pitfalls as well.

Here are four things to think about as Donald Trump prepares for the debates. We also looked at four things to watch for Clinton.

The economic impact of a major new museum

Sep 23, 2016
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Nancy Marshall-Genzer

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is a somber and celebratory look at the history of African-Americans in this country.  

It’s expected to draw huge crowds. And they’ll be bringing their wallets.

There’s a pretty straightforward way to analyze a museum’s economic impact. Analysts check out what people spend getting to the museum and how much money they drop there.

Keeping The Dead In Their Place

Sep 23, 2016

Runaway coffins. It's an issue floating to the surface with increasing frequency in Louisiana. It happened again last month when two feet of rain fell in less than 72 hours in some parts of the state. Towns were flooded — as were their cemeteries.

Back in the 1980s, Davao City was a largely lawless city on the largely lawless island of Mindanao, known to the wider world mostly for its Muslim and communist insurgencies.

Hip-hop artist Amisho Baraka, who performs as Sho Baraka, is one African-American man who feels left out by both major political parties — and he says this will affect his vote come November.

American lives have been getting steadily longer, and since the 1960s that trend has been driven mostly by a remarkable reduction in heart disease. But those improvements have slowed dramatically. Scientists are now wondering whether we're approaching the end of the trend of longer, healthier lives.

That's because the steady decline in heart disease is fading.

Almost two decades ago, Dr. Lars Aanning sat on the witness stand in a medical malpractice trial and faced a dilemma.

The South Dakota surgeon had been called to vouch for the expertise of one of his partners whose patient had suffered a stroke and permanent disability after an operation. The problem was that Aanning had, in his own mind, questioned his colleague's skill. His partner's patients had suffered injuries related to his procedures. But Aanning understood why his partner's attorney had called him as a witness: Doctors don't squeal on doctors.

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Lane Wallace

Hillary Clinton’s campaign is out with a proposal to raise the estate tax for the largest estates. She’d already suggested an expansion of the tax; new details appeared on her website Thursday proposing to up the top rate to 65 percent.

Manufacturing lags overall economy

Sep 23, 2016
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Mitchell Hartman

Manufacturing has been a lagging economic sector in the past year. 

The biggest problem for the sector right now, said economist Steve Murphy at Capital Economics, is the strong U.S. dollar. It makes U.S. exports more expensive for overseas companies and consumers, and puts competing suppliers from countries with weaker currencies at an advantage.

Murphy said the strong dollar began taking a toll on U.S. manufacturers in early 2016. And even automobile production can’t be counted on to spark a rebound in manufacturing, he said. 

How a gas shortage got worse with panic buying

Sep 23, 2016
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Emily Siner

If you drove past a gas station in Nashville last weekend, you might have seen bags over the pumps or else a really long line of cars. Not even minor celebrities were spared.

At an Exxon station on Monday — which had gas and no lines — Tennessee Titans punter Brett Kern was finally filling up. His car was almost on empty.

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Marketplace

On today's show, we'll talk about Hillary Clinton's plans for an inheritance tax; how Yahoo's massive data breach will affect Verizon's plans to purchase the company for $5 billion; and why one listener, as part of our "Secretary of the Future" series, thinks we should keep an eye on autonomous cars.  

Marketplace Tech for Friday, September 23, 2016

Sep 23, 2016
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Marketplace

On today's show, we'll talk about Yahoo's data breach and the possible origins of the hack. We'll also play this week's Silicon Tally with Rhonda Milrad, the CEO and founder of Relationup, a company that lets you text experts for relationship advice.

Protests in Charlotte, N.C., continued for a third night — without the violence of earlier demonstrations. Police officers and National Guard troops shared the streets with marchers protesting a fatal police shooting earlier this week.

Jay Price of member station WUNC describes the mood as "mellow," and says that police and protest leaders worked to keep the marchers moving, doing laps of uptown Charlotte.

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Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters

For more than 50 years, Cuba was an enemy of the United States. But not every American has seen Cuba as a threat.  

“You know, I tell folks all the time, I wake up every morning worried about something, but being invaded by Cuba is not one of them,” says Larry Wooten, president of the North Carolina Farm Bureau.

Harvard University reported that its endowment fund saw a loss of 2 percent, or $1.9 billion, on its investments for fiscal 2016. It's the single largest annual decline since the financial crisis.

Israelis are closely following the US election, but in newspapers read by ultra-Orthodox Jews, there are no photos of Hillary Clinton — and some editors say that won't change, even if she becomes president.

Beni Rabinovich, a staff writer at the Yated Neeman newspaper, says publishing pictures of Clinton just isn’t done at his daily.

“If we write about Clinton and Trump, it’s much easier to run a picture of Trump,” Rabinovich says.

The shooting of Keith Lamont Scott, a 43-year-old African-American man, by Charlotte, N.C., police is under investigation and the circumstances are very much in dispute, but when you listen to protesters, you hear that their frustration isn't about just this one case.

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Courtesy Project Runway

Fashion designer Roberi Parra is familiar with widespread shortages of food, supplies, and medicine. But as a contestant on this season's "Project Runway," he's a world away from his hometown of Caracas, Venezuela. 

The show's first episode featured a surprise challenge: The hosts of the series welcome the designers at a launch party. The designers are then a bit startled to learn that the decor for the party will also serve as materials for their looks.

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