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NPR Story
7:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Bringing Extreme WIFI To Remote Places

Google scientists have been testing a way to link computers to the internet in rural, war torn or disaster areas where high speed internet does not exist. We hear from Steven Levy, a senior writer with Wired magazine who was embedded with the Google team.

NPR Story
7:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Police Clear Protesters In Istanbul Park

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 10:40 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
7:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Lebanon Feels The Pain Of Syrian War Spillover

Weekend Edition Sunday Host Rachel Martin talks to Michael Young, the opinion page editor of the Daily Star newspaper in Beirut, about the spillover of Syria's conflict into Lebanon.

NPR Story
7:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Colorado Springs Learns To Live With Fire

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Colorado is often the site of devastating forest fires, but the city of Colorado Springs has been hit particularly hard as of late. In the span of just one year, more than 800 homes have been destroyed from wildfires in and around the city. This time last year, it was the Waldo Canyon fire, and now it's the Black Forest fire. NPR's Kirk Siegler spent the week in Colorado Springs and sent this report.

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NPR Story
7:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Syria, Economy Top The G8 Agenda

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

President Obama leaves tonight on a quick trip to Europe. He'll attend a G8 summit of industrialized nations in Northern Ireland. He'll also pay a visit to Germany, where his plans include a public speech at the historic Brandenburg Gate.

NPR's Scott Horsley will be traveling with the president. He joins us now. Hi, Scott.

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: Good to be with you, Rachel.

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NPR Story
7:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Putting Up A Good Front For The G8

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Like a lot of Northern Ireland, County Fermanagh, where the G8 Summit is being held has been hit hard by the recession in recent years. A lot of businesses there have had to close their doors. But before world leaders started pouring in for the G8 Summit, county officials decided to give their town a bit of a facelift. With money from a government grant, they put fake storefronts on some of the shuttered businesses. Imagine big stickers plastered to store windows to make them look like thriving stores; a real butcher shop or a busy cafe.

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NPR Story
7:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Will America Need Boots On The Ground In Syria?

Middle East analyst Andrew Tabler talks to Weekend Edition Sunday Host Rachel Martin about the U.S.'s decision this week to arm the Syrian rebels.

NPR Story
7:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

The Tragedy Of The Pina Colada

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

There are a lot of things that get a bad rap and then will never shake said bad rap no matter what: canned beanie-weanies come to mind, for example. They're never going to be thought of as high cuisine, let's face it. The song "Escape" by Rupert Holmes - though it has a kicking chorus - probably will not become a better song with time.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ESCAPE")

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NPR Story
7:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

When Should The Majors Pull Talent From The Minors?

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

MARTIN: Time for sports, and we're talking baseball this morning because it is an important time of year for aspiring major leaguers - time when the biggest stars from the minor leagues get called up to the big leagues. But, like most things in baseball, it's full of complicated twists and crazy rules, which means we need to call in Mike Pesca to explain. Hi, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hi. Thanks for the call-up.

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NPR Story
7:30 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Will The NSA Rethink Its Data Collection System?

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 7:38 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We've started hearing from some of the Internet companies implicated in the NSA data collection scandal. On Friday, Facebook and Microsoft disclosed for the first time that last year they received thousands of requests from the government to hand over information about their users. Meanwhile, the National Security Agency is still on the defensive. The agency's head spoke on Capitol Hill last week in an effort to reassure lawmakers that the NSA is not spying on Americans.

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