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Africa
4:22 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

What Lies Ahead For Egypt

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 9:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

To talk more about the changes in Egypt, we turn to Michele Dunne. She's director of the Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East at the Atlantic Council, a think tank here in Washington. Welcome to the program.

DR. MICHELE DUNNE: Thanks, Audie.

CORNISH: So let's go back to the interim president, Adly Mansour. He was the supreme justice of Egypt's Supreme Constitutional Court. Tell us more about him and some of his ties to previous regimes.

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Africa
4:22 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

In Post-Coup Egypt, Morsi Allies Feel Effects

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:38 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

Egypt has a new interim president.

ADLY MANSOUR: (Foreign language spoken)

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Around the Nation
4:22 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

The Statue Of Liberty Reopens

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:38 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish. The Statue of Liberty is once again welcoming visitors to New York Harbor. Lady Liberty reopened for tours today for the first time since Hurricane Sandy, more than eight months ago. While the statue itself was not harmed, the storm did cause extensive damage to the island below it.

The National Park Service has been working towards today's reopening ever since. Here's NPR's Joel Rose.

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Politics
4:22 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Ted Cruz And His Texas Electorate At Odds On Immigration

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:38 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish. Happy 4th of July. And we begin the hour by taking the nation's political temperature on a couple of points. First, immigration, and how that issue is playing in a key border state. In our series, Texas 2020, we've been covering the implications of changing demographics. One of the rising political stars in Texas is the son of a foreign-born father and American mother.

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Found Recipes
4:22 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Hard Crab Stew, No Longer Hard (Or Messy)

Hard crabs, like these blue crabs, are used in Bill Smith's Crab Stew recipe.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 9:58 pm

Some of the greatest summer food experiences take you outside. Whether it's shucking corn and barbecuing or spitting watermelon seeds, an outdoor setting can add a whole new dimension to food.

Bill Smith, chef at Crook's Corner in Chapel Hill, N.C., says some of his favorite summer food memories took place at picnic tables over messy bowls of his grandmother's crab stew. He shared a recipe for All Things Considered's Found Recipes series.

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Shots - Health News
3:03 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Gut Bacteria We Pick Up As Kids Stick With Us For Decades

Streptococcus bacteria, like this strain, can be found in our guts.
Janice Haney Carr CDC Public Health Image Library

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 9:06 am

Most of the microbes in our guts appear to remain stable for years, perhaps even most of our lives, researchers reported Thursday.

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Fourth Of July: When The Piccolo Gets To Shine

Jim Walker plays the piccolo. (www.jimwalkerflute.com)

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 4:47 pm

Fourth of July means we’ll be hearing a lot of John Philip Sousa’s famous military march “Stars and Stripes Forever.”

The big highlight comes toward the end, when the piccolos in the orchestra stand and let loose over the rest of the orchestra.

But imagine being the piccolo player who has to play that part over and over.

“The first time I played it was in the seventh grade,” Jim Walker, the retired principal flutist and piccolo player for the Los Angeles Philharmonic told Here & Now.

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Is Your DNA Private? It Might Not Be

Vickie Chaplin loads patient samples into a machine for testing at Myriad Genetics Friday, May 31, 2002, in Salt Lake City. (Douglas C. Pizac/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 6:02 pm

Would you want your girlfriend’s parents to be able to test your DNA to find out your ancestry? What if the grad school you were applying to wanted to test for tendencies for mental illness?

Within a few years, the cost of DNA sequencing may be just a few hundred dollars. When it gets that cheap, it will be easy for anyone to get a test.

But should there be legal restrictions on it? And is there a way to keep our DNA private?

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

The Rowing Team That Stunned the World

This photo from the 1936 Olympic Games shows the University of Washington eight-oar boat (top) crossing the finish line just ahead of second-place Italy and third-place Germany. (University of Washington Libraries, Special Collection)

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 6:02 pm

In 1936, a rowing team from the University of Washington stunned the world by winning a gold medal in eight-oar crew at the Berlin Olympics in front of a crowd that included Adolph Hitler and Joseph Goebbels.

The sons of American loggers, farmers and shipyard workers defeated elite European teams, grabbing the attention of millions of Americans and transforming the sport.

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NPR Story
1:43 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

How To Shoot Photos Of Fireworks

Bill Sandidge, left, and Nancy Koughan, of Decatur, Ga., watch a fireworks display on the field following a baseball game between the Chicago Cubs and the Atlanta Braves, Wednesday, July 4, 2012, in Atlanta. (David Goldman/AP)

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 4:47 pm

Spectacular firework displays are the grand finale of big Fourth of July celebrations.

Boston Globe freelance photographer Aram Boghosian will be at Boston’s Charles River Esplanade for tonight’s event and has some tips for how to take great photographs.

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