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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Fourth Of July: When The Piccolo Gets To Shine

Jim Walker plays the piccolo. (www.jimwalkerflute.com)

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 4:47 pm

Fourth of July means we’ll be hearing a lot of John Philip Sousa’s famous military march “Stars and Stripes Forever.”

The big highlight comes toward the end, when the piccolos in the orchestra stand and let loose over the rest of the orchestra.

But imagine being the piccolo player who has to play that part over and over.

“The first time I played it was in the seventh grade,” Jim Walker, the retired principal flutist and piccolo player for the Los Angeles Philharmonic told Here & Now.

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Is Your DNA Private? It Might Not Be

Vickie Chaplin loads patient samples into a machine for testing at Myriad Genetics Friday, May 31, 2002, in Salt Lake City. (Douglas C. Pizac/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 6:02 pm

Would you want your girlfriend’s parents to be able to test your DNA to find out your ancestry? What if the grad school you were applying to wanted to test for tendencies for mental illness?

Within a few years, the cost of DNA sequencing may be just a few hundred dollars. When it gets that cheap, it will be easy for anyone to get a test.

But should there be legal restrictions on it? And is there a way to keep our DNA private?

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

The Rowing Team That Stunned the World

This photo from the 1936 Olympic Games shows the University of Washington eight-oar boat (top) crossing the finish line just ahead of second-place Italy and third-place Germany. (University of Washington Libraries, Special Collection)

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 6:02 pm

In 1936, a rowing team from the University of Washington stunned the world by winning a gold medal in eight-oar crew at the Berlin Olympics in front of a crowd that included Adolph Hitler and Joseph Goebbels.

The sons of American loggers, farmers and shipyard workers defeated elite European teams, grabbing the attention of millions of Americans and transforming the sport.

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NPR Story
1:43 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

How To Shoot Photos Of Fireworks

Bill Sandidge, left, and Nancy Koughan, of Decatur, Ga., watch a fireworks display on the field following a baseball game between the Chicago Cubs and the Atlanta Braves, Wednesday, July 4, 2012, in Atlanta. (David Goldman/AP)

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 4:47 pm

Spectacular firework displays are the grand finale of big Fourth of July celebrations.

Boston Globe freelance photographer Aram Boghosian will be at Boston’s Charles River Esplanade for tonight’s event and has some tips for how to take great photographs.

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NPR Story
1:43 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

'House Jackers' Work To Save Homes From The Next Sandy

Greg Patterson shovels dirt near the foundation of a home that he and his father are elevating eight feet. (Tracey Samuelson/WHYY)

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 6:02 pm

The Fourth of July is one of the busiest times of the year on the Jersey Shore. Of course this year, many communities are still recovering from Superstorm Sandy.

Determined to be prepared for the next big storm, some property owners are lifting their homes and businesses higher above sea level.

The people who do this work are called “house jackers.” And they are in high demand these days.

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NPR Story
1:43 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Meningitis Vaccination Effort Aimed At Gay Men

Allen Smith, 21, from West Hollywood, Calif., gets a free vaccine against bacterial meningitis at the AIDS Healthcare Foundation in West Hollywood, Calif., Monday, April 15, 2013. (Damian Dovarganes/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 6:02 pm

There have been 22 cases in the past three years of a deadly new strain of meningitis that has spread in New York’s gay, bisexual and MSM (men who have sex with men) communities.

Seven of the men who contracted the illness died.

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The Salt
12:17 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Fizz And Fireworks: Make A Patriotic Homemade Soda For The Fourth

Audie Cornish for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:38 pm

If you haven't heard the buzz — or maybe it's the fizz — handmade sodas have been experiencing a full-on revival over the past few years. Whether they're mixed at home with a Soda Stream-like device or made at an old-fashioned soda fountain, the rise of homemade sodas has been driven by a general shift toward less-processed foods.

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Interviews
11:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Emmylou Harris And Rodney Crowell: Harmonizing To That 'Old Yellow Moon'

Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell have been friends and collaborators since the 1970s. Their new album together is called Old Yellow Moon.
David McClister Nonesuch Records

This interview was originally broadcast on March 28, 2013.

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The Two-Way
10:37 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Here She Is: Statue Of Liberty Reopens On Independence Day

She's open for visitors again.
Reena Rose Sibayan The Jersey Journal/Landov

It's an even more notable July 4th this year on Liberty Island in New York Harbor, where the Statue of Liberty is open for the first time since Superstorm Sandy pummeled the Mid-Atlantic region last fall.

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The Two-Way
10:32 am
Thu July 4, 2013

As Southwest Finally Cools, Southeast Gets Drenched

That's a lot of hail: the scene in Santa Rosa, N.M., after the storm blew through Wednesday.
Santa Rosa, N.M., Fire Department

The good news from the National Weather Service:

"The Western U.S. will begin to cool on Wednesday after several days of record-high temperatures. Temperatures will still be hot in many locations, but will be closer to normal for this time of year."

The not-so-good news if you're in the Southeast and have outdoor plans on Independence Day:

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