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6:49 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Artist's Fake Diploma To Be Sold At Auction

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:55 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. You can spend tens of thousands on a liberal arts degree, or just buy a fake diploma. The artist David Hockney's fake diploma is expected to sell at auction this week for up to $27,000. He created it in 1962 when he was denied a real degree by the Royal College of Art because he refused to write a final essay. And who know? The work of a famous artist might end up worth more in the long run than a real diploma.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
6:44 am
Mon June 24, 2013

'Everything Possible' Being Done For Ailing Nelson Mandela

Prayers for Nelson Mandela: At Regina Mundi church in Soweto township, South Africa, on Sunday, congregants prayed for the former South African leader.
Dai Kurokawa EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 8:19 am

South Africans, and millions more people around the world, are waiting anxiously for further word about Nelson Mandela and praying for the former president and anti-apartheid icon.

Mandela, 94, remains in critical condition at a hospital in Pretoria where he's being treated for a recurring respiratory infection.

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National Security
6:43 am
Mon June 24, 2013

NSA Leaker Edward Snowden Is A Man On The Move

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

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Europe
6:11 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Authorities Find Clues To Bridge Disappearance

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene with a story that perfectly fits the headline: only in Russia.

A 23-year-old in the north of that country was looking to find some scrap metal. You know, to make an extra buck. So he stole a small metal bridge which he took home and cut up with a welding torch. Authorities looking for the culprit and the missing pedestrian bridge didn't have to search very hard. He had dragged the bridge with his tractor, leaving a trail all the way to his house.

Business
4:49 am
Mon June 24, 2013

DuckDuckGo Benefits From Internet Searchers Wanting Privacy

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:55 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The leaks this month by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden revealed just how widespread government surveillance of phone and online information actually is. The revelations of the government's PRISM program have been raising the concerns about privacy, but also have boom to companies that promise greater privacy online.

Emma Jacobs of member station WHYY in Philadelphia has this report.

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Shots - Health News
4:45 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Proposed Changes In Organ Donation Stir Debate

Hospitals and organ banks could get more leeway in decisions about donations.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:55 am

The nation's organ transplant network will consider a controversial proposal Monday to overhaul the guidelines for an increasingly common form of organ donation.

The board of directors of the United Network for Organ Sharing will open a two-day meeting at the organization's headquarters in Richmond, Va., to consider new guidelines for donation after cardiac death.

Donation after cardiac death involves removing organs minutes after life-support has been stopped for patients who still have at least some brain activity.

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Energy
4:45 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Can An Old Massachusetts Fishing Port Light The World Again?

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick joined state officials, clean energy advocates and union representatives to break ground for the New Bedford Marine Commerce Terminal.
Jesse Costa WBUR

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 4:21 pm

A shabby old fishing port on the South Coast of Massachusetts was once known as the City That Lit the World. Its whale oil powered candles and lamps around the country.

Now, the city is trying to rekindle that flame with an alternative form of energy: offshore wind.

A Distant History Of Wealth

New Bedford's glory days are long gone. The city suffers from a long list of woes — high crime, persistent unemployment and poor public schools.

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Around the Nation
4:45 am
Mon June 24, 2013

In Chicago, Public Housing Experiment Enters New Phase

The last high rise at Chicago's Cabrini-Green public housing complex was demolished in 2011.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 12:25 pm

The Chicago Housing Authority has torn down all of its high rises and says it's close to completing its plans to transform public housing. Now, city leaders are moving to the next part of their plan: using public housing funds not just to build homes for poor families, but stores where they could shop and work. Some residents, however, say the city is breaking a promise to provide affordable housing.

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Joe's Big Idea
4:45 am
Mon June 24, 2013

For Sharpest Views, Scope The Sky With Quick-Change Mirrors

Before And After: These near-infrared images of Uranus show the planet as seen without adaptive optics (left) and with the technology turned on (right).
Courtesy of Heidi B. Hammel and Imke de Pater

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:55 am

It used to be that if astronomers wanted to get rid of the blurring effects of the atmosphere, they had to put their telescopes in space. But a technology called adaptive optics has changed all that.

Adaptive optics systems use computers to analyze the light coming from a star, and then compensate for changes wrought by the atmosphere, using mirrors that can change their shapes up to 1,000 times per second. The result: To anyone on Earth peering through the telescope, the star looks like the single point of light it really is.

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Shots - Health News
4:45 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Gloomy Thinking Can Be Contagious

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 10:59 am

When students show up at college in the fall, they'll have to deal with new classes, new friends and a new environment. In many cases, they will also have new roommates — and an intriguing new research study suggests this can have important mental health consequences.

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