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The Two-Way
7:28 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Book News: Story By 'Catch-22' Author Published For The First Time

Author Joseph Heller in his publisher's office in New York City on Oct. 9, 1974.
Jerry Mosey AP

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 10:29 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Parallels
7:09 am
Tue July 23, 2013

An Afghan Minister Fires Back At Impeachment Attempt

Ghulam Mujtaba Patang speaks at a news conference Monday after being dismissed from his post as Afghanistan's interior minister. He will stay in the post until the country's Supreme Court rules on the legality of his dismissal.
Mohammad Ismail Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 11:13 am

If you think it's tough being a Cabinet secretary in the U.S., having to deal with the demands of a fiercely partisan Congress and testify a few times a year, try being the Afghan interior minister.

"I have been summoned by the lower house 93 times, and 79 times by the upper house," says Ghulam Mujtaba Patang, who for the past 10 months has been in charge of the ministry that oversees the Afghan National Police.

"Based on this calculation, I have had one day in a week to work for the people," he says.

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The Two-Way
7:03 am
Tue July 23, 2013

James? George? What Will 'Baby Cambridge' Be Named?

Outside the London hospital where the newest prince was born, betting parlors have been advertising the odds on names.
Chris Jackson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 12:51 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Philip Reeves reports on the royal birth

Now that he's been born, the next big moments in little Baby Cambridge's life will be when he's seen in public and when the world hears what his name will be.

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Parallels
6:47 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Which Nations Hate The U.S.? Often Those Receiving U.S. Aid

A protester denounces President Obama during a march near Cairo's Tahrir Square on July 7. Bitter rivals in Egypt tend to be united in opposition to the U.S. government, which has been a leading aid donor to the country for decades.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 8:28 am

To figure out which countries dislike the U.S., one quick way is to simply look at which ones are getting the largest dollops of U.S. aid.

This wasn't the focus of a recent survey by the Pew Research Center. But it did emerge when Pew spoke to people in 39 countries about the U.S. and China, asking respondents if they had a favorable view of these two countries.

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Asia
6:29 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Japanese Commuters Save A Life During Rush Hour

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. At a station in Japan, a bunch of rush-hour commuters kept the train running on time and saved a life. When a woman stepping off the train fell between the stopped car and platform, about 40 commuters went into action. Along with transit workers, the passengers pushed the 32-ton train far enough away that the woman could be pulled up, pretty much unhurt. And the train? It left only eight minutes late. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Shots - Health News
6:28 am
Tue July 23, 2013

A Scientist Debunks The 'Magic' Of Vitamins And Supplements

Ads often tout dietary supplements and vitamins as "natural" remedies. But studies show megadoses of some vitamins can actually boost the risk of heart disease and cancer, warns Dr. Paul Offit.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 4:21 pm

A pediatrician who spent years defending childhood vaccines against the likes of actress/activist Jenny McCarthy has launched an assault on megavitamins and dietary supplements.

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Pop Culture
5:56 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Seventh Try's The Charm For Hemingway Look-Alike

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:37 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

I mean, isn't it every white haired, husky, bearded man's ambition to look like Hemingway? Sure seemed that way at the annual Papa Hemingway Look-Alike Contest. The annual event was just held at Sloppy Joe's, a favorite Hemingway watering hole on Key West. The winner: software developer Stephen Terry. He beat out more than a hundred hopefuls, including the husband of chef Paula Deen. Those who didn't win, take heart, it was Terry's seventh try. Now that's one earnest effort.

NPR Story
5:06 am
Tue July 23, 2013

What's Different About The Latest Push For Middle East Talks

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 8:28 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Secretary of State John Kerry is trying to bring Israeli and Palestinian officials to Washington to discuss a possible resumption of peace talks. Kerry announced on Friday that the two sides have tentatively agreed to preliminary talks but when and if actual peace negotiations will occur is uncertain. White House spokesman Jay Carney said yesterday he hopes the parties will be in Washington in the coming weeks.

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NPR Story
5:06 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Political Reporters Hit The (Bike) Trail In Iowa

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:37 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Okay. Political stories often come from the White House and they often take our political correspondents, say, to Iowa. That's where three of them are right now. But not for an election cycle, but actually to cycle. NPR's Don Gonyea, Scott Horsley and Brian Naylor are all on vacation together, pedaling across the state of Iowa, hundreds of miles with thousands of other cyclists. It's an annual summertime ritual known as RAGBRAI.

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NPR Story
5:06 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Republicans Pin Hopes On Senate Turnover In 2014

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Washington, D.C. the next election always seems just around the corner, even in the middle of summer when it seems a long way away to everyone else. Republicans are in the Senate minority today, but about now they're feeling confident about their prospects to pick up seats and maybe even regain the majority in 2014. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson reports.

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