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2:53 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

'My Lunches With Orson' Puts You At The Table With Welles

Central Press Getty Images

If you asked me to name my favorite movie scene, I'd choose the one in Citizen Kane when newspaper owner Charles Foster Kane steals his rivals' best reporters, then throws a party in his own honor. As musicians literally sing his praises, we watch Kane dance with chorus girls wearing a look of radiant delight. It's a moment bursting with promise and cockiness and joie de vivre, made all the more exuberant because Kane's pleasure is so obviously shared by Welles himself.

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NPR Story
1:42 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

12-Year-Old Learns Perils Of Day Trading In New Novel

In her new book for young adults, “The Short Seller,” Elissa Brent Weissman gives us the ultimate “short seller”: 12-year-old Lindy Sachs (excerpt below).

Math bores her until her father starts teaching her how to trade on the stock market.

When Lindy is home sick with a bout of mono, he gives her her very own account and $100 to invest however as she likes, and she quickly gets in over her head.

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NPR Story
1:42 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

A New Kind Of Second Opinion — At A Price

(surroundsound5000/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 4:04 pm

Psychologist Sandor Gardos had seen 80 experts, including Nobel prize winners, but none were able to diagnose his serious medical condition — much less offer any effective treatment.

That’s when a friend told him about a new firm, MetaMed, which specializes in a different kind of second opinion. It offers personalized research for a price to people with difficult medical conditions.

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NPR Story
1:41 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

How The Timing Of Meals Affects Our Waistlines

(Nicole Salow/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 2:54 pm

A growing body of evidence suggests that it’s not just what we eat that’s important. It’s also when we eat that influence our health and waistlines.

We take a look at the science, in a conversation with NPR’s food and health correspondent Allison Aubrey.

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The Two-Way
1:25 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Royal Baby Gets A Name: George Alexander Louis

Britain's Prince William, right, and Kate, Duchess of Cambridge hold the Prince of Cambridge on Tuesday as they pose for photographers outside St. Mary's Hospital in London.
Kirsty Wigglesworth AP

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 3:15 pm

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have now named their new baby boy: The third in line for the British throne was given the name George Alexander Louis.

"The baby will be known as His Royal Highness Prince George of Cambridge," the crown said in a press release.

By historical standards, this is an expedited naming. In the past, royals have waited weeks to announce a name. Prince Charles' name wasn't known for a month; Prince William's name wasn't made public for seven days.

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The Two-Way
1:25 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

U.S. Is 'Through The Worst Of Yesterday's Winds,' Obama Says

President Obama during his address Wednesday at Knox College in Galesburg, Ill.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 2:26 pm

President Obama on Wednesday launched another effort to lay out his vision for how to strengthen the U.S. economy with a midday speech at Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., in which he hit themes familiar to those who followed his 2008 and 2012 presidential campaigns.

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The Salt
1:18 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Chow Down In Sync With Your Circadian Clock

The time of day you eat really does make a difference when it comes to health outcomes.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 3:34 pm

We've already nudged you this week about the benefits of breakfast. And this got us thinking more about the timing of our meals.

There's a growing body of evidence to suggest that when we eat during a 24-hour cycle is likely more important for our health than we realized.

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Author Interviews
1:01 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

After WWII, Europe Was A 'Savage Continent' Of Devastation

In his latest book, Savage Continent, Keith Lowe takes a look at Europe in the years directly following World War II.
Picador

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 5:59 pm

In the introduction to his book, Savage Continent, Keith Lowe writes:

Imagine a world without institutions. No governments. No school or universities. No access to any information. No banks. Money no longer has any worth. There are no shops, because no one has anything to sell. Law and order are virtually non-existent because there is no police force and no judiciary. Men with weapons roam the streets taking what they want. Women of all classes and ages prostitute themselves for food and protection.

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The Two-Way
12:47 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Sales Of New Homes Rise Again, Hit Five-Year High

A new home that was under construction earlier this year in San Mateo, Calif.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 1:35 pm

Note added on Aug. 23, 2013: When we wrote this post and its headline — "Sales Of New Homes Rise Again, Hit Five-Year High" — the data said that was true. Now, the agencies that produce the numbers have issued revisions that indicate sales of new homes in June were the second-best in the last five years. Go here to read about that.

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All Tech Considered
12:46 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Finland-Based Startup Will Let You 'Pay With Your Face'

Outside of a John Woo film like Face/Off, starring John Travolta and Nicolas Cage, it's nearly impossible for someone to steal your face.
Chris Pizzello AP

In our "Weekly Innovation" blog series, we explore an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Previously we featured the sink-urinal and Smart Bedding.

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