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Around the Nation
8:01 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Blasts Don't Stop 78-Year-Old Marathoner In Boston

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 2:04 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep, with congratulations to Bill Iffrig, who ran the Boston Marathon at age 78. He was approaching the finish line when he saw the explosions. Video footage shows him tumbling down. Mr. Iffrig saw scrambled images, smoke in the air, maybe a fragment of what he thought was a bomb, but he stood up and walked the last few feet to the end. He told the Herald of Everett, Washington: When you've run 26 miles, you're not going to stop there.

Around the Nation
8:01 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Violating His Own Rule, Judge Fines Himself

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 2:04 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The Two-Way
7:58 am
Tue April 16, 2013

The Cruelest Month: Boston Blasts Join List Of Dark Incidents

Oklahoma City Bombing: The Albert P. Murrah Federal Building shows the devastation caused by a fuel and fertilizer truck bomb on April 19, 1995. The blast killed 168 people and injured more than 500.
Bob Daemmrich AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

Howard Berkes is an NPR correspondent based in Salt Lake City.

It may have been the dumbest thing I ever said. On April 19, 1999, I stood before an audience at Idaho State University in Pocatello, talking about the cruelest month. April, I pointed out, and April 19 in particular, have provided celebrated, infamous and sometimes horrific moments in our history.

What was it about the month, I wondered, or the time of year, that made April so meaningful and at times so cruel? Back then, the list was relatively short:

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The Two-Way
6:33 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Boston Marathon Explosions: Latest Developments

A marathon runner, wrapped in a blanket to stay warm after the race, watched Monday as authorities investigated the bombings that shook the finish line area at the Boston Marathon. At least three people were killed and dozens were wounded.
Nicolaus Czarnecki Barcroft Media /Landov

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 6:59 am

The day after two bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, investigators began to unravel some of the details of what happened, and we began to learn about the lives of the three people who were killed.

FBI Special Agent in Charge Richard DesLauriers said that they believed the devices used in the attack may have been pressure-cooker bombs stuffed with BBs and nails. Investigators said the bombs may have been left inside nylon bags or backpacks.

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Around the Nation
5:29 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Authorities Comb Evidence For Clues In Boston Blasts

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 2:04 pm

Steve Inskeep talks to Juan Zarate, former deputy national security adviser for combating terrorism, about what investigators are looking for the day after the explosions at the Boston Marathon.

Around the Nation
5:29 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Store Manager Was Close To Blasts In Boston

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 2:04 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

I'm David Greene.

Let's work through what we know about yesterday's explosions at the Boston Marathon.

INSKEEP: Hours of struggle and accomplishment changed in an instant. Mirabelle Garcia had just finished running her ninth Boston Marathon.

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Around the Nation
5:29 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Deadly Blasts Punctuate Boston Marathon's Finish Line

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 2:03 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

The lead agency in yesterday's Boston Marathon explosions is the FBI. Federal investigators say this morning they are doing all they can to get answers, but there is still much they do not know.

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The Two-Way
4:28 am
Tue April 16, 2013

NPR.org Hacked; 'Syrian Electronic Army' Takes Credit

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 12:30 pm

The Two-Way, NPR.org and some of NPR's Twitter accounts were hacked late Monday by an organization that's said to support Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime, as this statement from NPR reports:

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Planet Money
3:55 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Most People Are Supposed To Pay This Tax. Almost Nobody Actually Pays It.

Amazon doesn't charge sales tax in most states — but you may still be on the hook to pay the tax.
Scott Sady AP

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 2:17 pm

The majority of Americans have now filed their taxes. And the majority of Americans have done so incorrectly.

There is one mistake, in particular, that lots of people made: They bought tax-free things online or in another state — and they failed to pay tax on their purchase in their home state.

It's called a use tax. As far as I can tell, accountants and tax lawyers are some of the only people who pay it.

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Author Interviews
3:53 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Is The United States A 'Dispensable Nation'?

Michael Krinke iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 2:04 pm

In The Dispensable Nation: American Foreign Policy In Retreat, former State Department adviser Vali Nasr describes veteran diplomat Richard Holbrooke being all but frozen out by President Obama's inner circle, for whom Nasr believes diplomacy was a "lost art."

Instead of engaging civilians to find political solutions in Afghanistan and beyond, they would look first to the military and intelligence agencies for solutions that were politically popular — that includes getting U.S. troops out of Afghanistan.

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