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The Two-Way
8:07 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Egypt Tense After Bloody Crackdown On Protests

Mourners attend the funeral of Ammar Badie, son of the Muslim Brotherhood's Supreme Guide, at the Katameya cemetery in the New Cairo district on Sunday. Badie was killed in clashes with security forces.
Ed Giles Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 1:51 am

This post was updated 1:00 a.m. ET Monday

The Egyptian government says at least 36 people were killed Sunday — Islamists who had been in custody of security forces, according to a report in The New York Times.

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Middle East
6:41 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Cairo Mosque Is A Protest Flashpoint

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 4:07 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. At least 800 people have been killed in Egypt since the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi last month and the subsequent protests launched by his supporters. Yesterday, a Cairo mosque was the scene of a struggle between police and soldiers and Morsi supporters who had taken shelter there.

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NPR Story
6:39 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Bucking Conventional Sports Wisdom

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 4:07 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SPORTS THEME MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Sports, like anything, really, has its conventional wisdom. If you spend more on your team, they'll win more games. If you had a dismal season last year, this year you're probably not going to the playoffs. So on and so forth.

NPR's Mike Pesca says not so. He joins us now to explain what on Earth he means. Hey, Mike.

(LAUGHTER)

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Wait a minute. You set up a scenario whereby you question what on Earth I mean. But you're the one asking that, so yeah.

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NPR Story
6:39 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Why The Government Blocked The Airline Merger

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 4:07 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Last week, the Justice Department put the breaks on a deal that could create the world's largest airline. The government has blocked a proposed merger between American Airlines and US Airways with a lawsuit. The action elicited some surprise because the airline industry has had a major run of mergers in recent years.

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NPR Story
6:39 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Japan Seeks 'Escape From Postwar Regime'

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 4:07 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

On Aug. 15, 1945, Emperor Hirohito announced Japan's surrender to Allied forces, putting an end to World War II. With the peace deal, Japan was forced to demilitarize.

Now, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is suggesting it may be time for Japan to shake off its postwar identity. This past week, Abe sent senior officials to a shrine glorifying Japan's soldiers, including some who were prosecuted for war crimes. The government of China protested. South Korea, which also suffered under Japan during the war, is concerned as well.

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Movies
5:31 am
Sun August 18, 2013

'Cutie And The Boxer': Two Lives Entwined At Home, In Art

Ushio Shinohara is best known for his "boxing paintings" — performance pieces often created for an audience, in which he strikes at his canvases with gloves dipped in pigments — and for his fanciful, brightly colored sculptures of motorcycles adorned with all manner of extras.
Radius/TWC

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 7:14 pm

Japanese painter and sculptor Ushio Shinohara was the bad boy of the avant-garde when he came to the U.S. more than 50 years ago. He knew Andy Warhol, hung with Red Grooms and polarized audiences with his vivid work.

And Ushio met his wife, Noriko Shinohara, not long after arriving here. She's an artist, too, but she's spent most of her career living in his shadow.

Less so recently, though. Noriko is coming into her own. And now the story of their life together is the subject of an intimate new documentary called Cutie and the Boxer.

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Middle East
5:29 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Obama Struggles To Find Effective Egypt Policy

President Obama delivers a statement on Egypt at his vacation home on Martha's Vineyard on Thursday.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 7:00 pm

The Obama administration is in a difficult situation with its Egypt policy.

President Obama, who often talks about free speech and human rights, has cancelled joint military exercises with Egypt but has stopped short of cutting off aid to the Egyptian military. As the violence continues in the streets of Cairo and other Egyptian cities, all sides seem unhappy with the U.S. approach.

In 2009, on his first trip to the Middle East as president, in the same year he won the Nobel Peace Prize, Obama spoke of a new approach to relations with the Islamic world.

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Parallels
5:29 am
Sun August 18, 2013

What's Next For Egypt: 3 Scenarios

Supporters of the deposed Egyptian president, Mohammed Morsi, carry an injured demonstrator who was shot during clashes in Ramses Square in Cairo on Friday. Dozens were killed nationwide in escalating violence.
AMR ABDALLAH DALSH Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 12:27 pm

For two years, the conversation on Egypt centered on how to build a democracy. Suddenly the discussion has turned much darker, with some wondering aloud whether the largest Arab nation is hurtling toward civil war.

The bloody crackdown by Egypt's security forces has raised the specter of a protracted conflict pitting the military against the Muslim Brotherhood, the country's most powerful political force.

Egypt's escalating crisis is far too volatile for any declarative statements, analysts say. But here are three possible scenarios that could play out:

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Sun August 18, 2013

A Musical Power Couple With A Dozen-Strong Entourage

Mark Seliger Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 4:07 pm

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Author Interviews
5:47 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

What Drove Wild West's Jesse James To Become An Outlaw?

Jesse James, seen here in his 1874 wedding portrait, fought in the American Civil War before he formed a gang and started robbing banks.
AP

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 5:57 pm

Tales of Jesse James's exploits have grown to almost mythological proportions since the actual man and his gang galloped over the plains stealing horses, holding up trains, and robbing banks in the years after the Civil War. Shot All To Hell: Jesse James, The Northfield Raid, and the Wild West's Greatest Escape is a new book about the legendary man.

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