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NPR Story
7:36 am
Sun September 15, 2013

The Olympics Has A Big Problem

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:50 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

MARTIN: NPR's Mike Pesca was in Buenos Aires last week for the International Olympic Committee's big announcement of who will host the 2020 Olympics. It's Tokyo, by the way. While he was there, it really set in for him that the Olympics has a problem. He thinks he knows a way to fix it. He joins us now. Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: I just talked to smart, informed people. I didn't really come up with it...

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NPR Story
7:36 am
Sun September 15, 2013

The Language You Use Might Save You Money

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:50 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The language we speak affects much of how we understand the world and probably in more ways than you think. Keith Chen is a professor of economics at UCLA and he's been studying some examples of this. He's found that the way language is structured can influence our eating habits, our likelihood of smoking, even the way we spend or save our money. Keith Chen, welcome to the program.

KEITH CHEN: Thank you. It's excited to be here.

MARTIN: So, explain how this works.

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NPR Story
7:36 am
Sun September 15, 2013

Traveling By Cargo, With Lots Of Reading Time

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:50 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

WEEKEND EDITION's travel segment Winging It aims to bring you advice and ideas about different ways to spend your free time and profiles of people embarking of adventures of all kinds. A few months, ago we introduced you to Rebecca Hall. When we spoke with her, Hall was getting ready to set out on an unusual journey - traveling from Greece to Hong Kong on a cargo ship.

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The Sunday Conversation
5:39 am
Sun September 15, 2013

Compensation Funds For Victims Of Tragedy A 'Small Solace'

Kenneth Feinberg speaks at a press conference on the One Fund, established for victims of the Boston Marathon bombings.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:50 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

In so many American tragedies, from the attacks of Sept. 11 to the Boston Marathon bombings, victims who survive and the families of those who don't are offered compensation. And when it comes time to figure out who should be compensated and how much, time and time again, Kenneth Feinberg's phone rings.

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Author Interviews
5:27 am
Sun September 15, 2013

Read The Rainbow: 'Roy G. Biv' Puts New Spin On Color Wheel

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:50 am

There are a lot of fascinating details hiding below the surface in the world of color. For instance, scientists once thought the average color of the entire universe was turquoise — until they recalculated and realized it was beige.

In Japan, you wait at a stoplight until it turns from red to blue, even though it's the same green color as American stoplights.

And in World War II, the British painted a whole flotilla of warships pinkish-purple so they'd blend in with the sky at dusk and confuse the Germans. That's right — pink warships.

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Television
5:15 am
Sun September 15, 2013

The Voice Of Rocky And Natasha Earns An Emmy

Voice actress June Foray will receive the Governor's Award at the Creative Arts Emmys.
Amanda Edwards UCLA/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:50 am

The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show featured a fearless flying squirrel and his slow-witted moose sidekick. They did battle with two scheming but incompetent Soviet spies named Boris and Natasha.

The cartoon is an American classic, beloved for a wry sense of humor that appeals to kids and their parents. It originally aired from 1959 until 1964, but has been in syndication ever since, most recently on the Cartoon Network and Boomerang.

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Sun September 15, 2013

Mike Doughty Annuls The 'Dark Marriage' Of His Former Band

Mike Doughty's latest album, Circles Super Bon Bon, revisits songs from his years fronting the band Soul Coughing.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:50 am

Mike Doughty spent the 1990s as the gravel-voiced frontman for Soul Coughing. Fusing elements of pop, jazz, hip-hop and house music, the band had a sound all its own — but Doughty says he was never satisfied with it.

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The U.S. Response To Syria
6:15 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

Breaking Down Chemical Weapons, One Fact At A Time

A U.S. Marine carries a light flame-thrower while wearing experimental clothing designed to protect against atomic, biological and chemical warfare in 1960.
Keystone Getty Images

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 8:00 pm

Saturday, the U.S. and Russia announced an agreement on the destruction of Syria's chemical weapons. The country has a week to detail its chemical arsenal and has until the middle of 2014 to destroy its stockpile. The State Department has published a framework for the plan.

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Animals
5:47 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

In France's Camargue, Bulls Are A Passion And A Way Of Life

The black, long-horned Camargue bull is just one of two breeds of fighting bulls in Europe. The bulls are shown here at the Roman arena in Arles, southern France.
Eleanor Beardsley NPR

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 8:00 pm

Amid streaks of lightning and startling thunder claps on a recent day, I head out into the middle of the marshy wetlands known as the Camargue. I'm with a group of tourists, piled on hay bales in the back of a flatbed trailer pulled by a massive tractor.

The delta in southern France where two branches of the Rhone River meet the sea, the Camargue is the biggest Mediterranean delta after the Nile. The stunning ecosystem is home to pink flamingos, rice paddies and salt, which has been harvested here since the Middle Ages.

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Sports
5:47 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

For Rich NFL Players, Do Fines Matter?

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 6:15 pm

The NFL has fined Detroit Lions defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh $100,000 for an illegal low block behind an opponent's knee. Suh, twice voted the league's "dirtiest player" by fellow players in a Sporting News poll, is appealing the fine, the largest ever for on-the-field conduct. The question for Suh and fellow athletes is whether fines change behavior.

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