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It's All Politics
12:18 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Democrats Face The Two States Of Texas: Urban And Rural

Texas is beginning to trend urban (downtown Houston, left), which could be good news for Democrats, who tend not to do well in rural areas like Wise County near Boyd (right).
David J. Phillip (left)/LM Otero (right) AP

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 2:32 pm

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Parallels
11:59 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Nelson Mandela's Prison Adventures

Near the end of his 27 years in prison, Nelson Mandela was taken to secret meetings with government officials and for drives around Cape Town. Here, he returned to his Robben Island prison cell for a visit in 1994, shortly before he became South Africa's first black president.
Louise Gubb Corbis

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 7:15 pm

On Christmas Eve 1986, a South Africa prison commander responsible for watching over Nelson Mandela casually asked the world's most famous prisoner, "Mandela, would you like to see the city?"

Mandela was completely surprised, but agreed. The prison commander, Lt. Col. Gawie Marx, promptly put Mandela in his car for a leisurely drive around Cape Town, one of the world's most scenic cities.

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The Two-Way
11:51 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Jailed Tunisian Rapper Is Freed; Song Called Police 'Dogs'

Tunisian rapper Ala Yaacoubi, also known by his rap name Weld El 15, left, speaks alongside his lawyer, Ghazi Mrabet, before his trial last month.
Fethi Belaid AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 3:29 pm

A Tunisian appeals court has freed rapper Ala Yaacoubi, who last month was sentenced to two years in prison for insulting police officers with his song "The Police Are Dogs."

Critics had said the arrest of Yaacoubi, 25, who performs under the name Weld El 15, was a sign of repression in Tunisia, where mass rallies overthrew former leader Zine El Abidine Ben Ali at the start of the Arab Spring in 2011. As NPR reported that summer, several rap songs became anthems for that shift.

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Shots - Health News
11:10 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Savory And Sweet: A Taste For Infertility

Humans have long relied on the sense of taste in the struggle to survive and multiply. A bitter taste alerts us to a plant that may be poisonous. A sweet taste tells us that a plant is likely high in calories and can help sustain us.

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The Two-Way
8:45 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Top Stories: Fallen Firefighters Honored; Heat Wave Continues

Oh, baby it's hot: The sun shines down on people standing atop the roof of the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles, one of the cities in the grips of a dangerous heat wave.
Jonathan Alcorn Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 9:44 am

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The Two-Way
8:45 am
Tue July 2, 2013

VIDEOS: Solemn Salutes To Fallen Firefighters In Arizona

Holding on to each other: Firefighters hug during a memorial service Monday in Prescott, Ariz. They were honoring 19 others who died Sunday.
Michael Nelson EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 9:43 am

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Deceptive Cadence
8:03 am
Tue July 2, 2013

In Search Of The Great American Symphony

Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony have been consistent champions of American music of all shapes and sizes. Are there — or will there be — American symphonies that stand with those of Mozart and Beethoven, Mahler and Shostakovich?
Bill Swerbenski San Francisco Symphony

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 1:53 pm

Critics and fans love a good debate over the great American novel or great American movie. But what about the great American symphony?

Is there one? If not, why? If so, which symphonies are good candidates for the title? (Check out our Spotify list for some contenders.) And in the land of the melting pot, what does it mean for a symphony to be "American" in the first place?

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A Blog Supreme
8:03 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Facing Illness, An Improviser Learns The Art Of Patience

Dayna Stephens.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 10:07 am

Dayna Stephens is a patient musician. The 34-year-old tenor saxophonist and composer fashions supple, searching improvisations that brim with melodic cogency. His compositions often exude a widescreen sensibility with languid, narrative-like passages, suspenseful interludes and sumptuous harmonies.

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The Two-Way
7:34 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Pressure Builds On Egypt's Morsi To Compromise Or Step Down

Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators gathered in Cairo's Tahrir Square again Monday during a protest calling for the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi.
Mohamed El-Shahed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 9:37 am

With about 24 hours to go before the deadline set by Egypt's military to work with opponents and craft a roadmap that moves the country past its political problems or have one created for him by the army, Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi is under intense pressure. He must either "reach some kind of compromise" with those protesting against his government "or step aside," NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson tells our Newscast Desk.

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Around the Nation
7:20 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Sign Maker Misspells Florida, Twice

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 8:36 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. Florida's Department of Transportation ordered a new sign for Interstate 95. It read: Exit 344, University of Florida, Florida State College South Campus. Only one issue. Both times, Florida was spelled wrong. It read: Flordia. The sign manufacturer in Arkansas made that mistake. According to First Coast News, the company has agreed to fix the sign for free. They also might want to get off at that exit and head back to school.

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