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Health
7:47 am
Sun October 20, 2013

With Addiction, Breaking A Habit Means Resisting A Reflex

Addiction can come in a lot of forms, but the characteristics are the same.
aurumarcus Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 11:27 am

The pull of addiction can come from many directions: from food to alcohol to the Internet. So what connects those dependencies?

"Addiction is a memory, it's a reflex. It's training your brain in something which is harmful to yourself," says Dr. Charles P. O'Brien, co-founder of the Center for Studies of Addiction at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Code Switch
6:14 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Asian-American Band Fights To Trademark Name 'The Slants'

The Slants' band members are all of Asian descent.
Courtesy of The Slants

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 10:08 am

The Slants, a six-member band from Portland, Ore., calls their sound "Chinatown Dance Rock" — a little bit New Order, a little bit Depeche Mode. They describe themselves as one of the first Asian-American rock bands. Their music caters to an Asian-American crowd, they've spoken at various Asian-American events, and they're proud of all of it.

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Media
6:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

What Glenn Greenwald Could Gain From New Media Venture

Glenn Greenwald, who first reported the disclosures of U.S. surveillance programs, is now leaving The Guardian to work with eBay founder Pierre Omidyar on a new journalism venture.
Silvia Izquierdo AP

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 8:58 am

Glenn Greenwald, who broke the story about the U.S. government's massive surveillance program, is quitting The Guardian. He's leaving the British daily and joining a journalism startup with eBay founder and billionaire philanthropist Pierre Omidyar.

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Technology
6:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

When Playing Video Games Means Sitting On Life's Sidelines

The reSTART center for Internet addiction is in the woods outside Seattle. The initial, inpatient part of the program is held on a property that has a treehouse and a garden.
Rachel Martin NPR

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 4:49 pm

A facility outside Seattle, surrounded by pine trees, is a refuge for addicts — of technology.

There are chickens, a garden and a big treehouse with a zip line. A few guys kick a soccer ball around between therapy appointments in the cottage's grassy backyard.

The reSTART center was set up in 2009. It treats all sorts of technology addictions, but most of the young men who come through here — and they are all young men — have the biggest problem with video games.

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World
6:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Saudi Act Of Protest Stuns U.N., And Some Observers

The U.N. Security Council votes on a resolution requiring Syria to give up its chemical weapons last month in New York. Last week, Saudi Arabia turned down a chance to take a seat on the Council.
Craig Ruttle AP

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 8:58 am

Known for quiet diplomacy, Saudi Arabia is taking an unusual and very public step to protest the international community's failure to resolve the crisis in Syria and other issues that interest Riyadh.

On Thursday, Saudi Arabia was elected to become a non-permanent member of the United Nations Security Council, which the Saudi ambassador to the U.N. initially called a defining moment in his nation's history.

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Parallels
6:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

You Have Questions About The NSA; We Have Answers

A sign outside the National Security Agency campus in Fort Meade, Md.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 4:48 pm

Four months have passed since former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden began spilling secrets about the NSA's surveillance programs, but many Americans still don't know what to think about the disclosures.

For good reason. The surveillance programs are highly technical, involving the bulk interception of huge volumes of communication data as they traverse multiple links and networks. The laws governing what the NSA can do are complex and open to conflicting interpretations.

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The Salt
6:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Unleashed On Halloween, Monster Cereals Haunt Hoarders

This Halloween season, the three big Monster Cereals will be joined by Frute Brute and Fruity Yummy Mummy, which haven't been on the market in decades.
Dan Pashman

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 3:11 pm

This Halloween season, the cereal monsters are on the loose. Count Chocula, Boo Berry and Franken Berry have consumers in their grasp — for a limited time only.

General Mills' line of "Monster Cereals" originally hit the market in the early '70s, but the company decided in 2010 they would only be available during the Halloween season.

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NPR Story
6:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Through 'Smoke And Mirrors,' Brett Dennen Looks For Himself

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 8:58 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
6:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Longtime Mexico-U.S. Rivalry Heats Up With Race To World Cup

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 8:58 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It's time now for sports, and it's been a crazy week for Mexico's soccer team. Struggling to make the World Cup, it looked like they were out of it for sure. And then, boom, they are back in the hunt, all thanks to their longtime rivals, the good old U.S. of A. NPR's Mike Pesca joins us now from New York to talk more of this. Good morning.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hey.

MARTIN: So, what happened?

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NPR Story
6:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Hillary Clinton Pays The Piper For London Parking Ticket

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 8:58 am

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was slapped with a $130 fine after parking illegally in London. Though most diplomats ignore such fees, Clinton ponied up the money (the amount was cut in half because it was paid within two weeks).

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