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Politics
5:52 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

New York Turns To Old Voting Machines For Upcoming Primary

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 6:54 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

Now to New York State where there have been other election problems. Election officials there say it's taking too long to finalize race results using electronic machines. So they're going old school and bringing out those with mechanical levers. WNYC's Brigid Bergin has the story.

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The Two-Way
4:53 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

Ailing Nelson Mandela Is Reportedly Improving

A man signs a large birthday card at Loftus Stadium in Pretoria for ailing former South African President Nelson Mandela's upcoming July 18 birthday. 'Madiba' is Mandela's clan name.
Alexander Joe AFP/Getty Images

Nelson Mandela remains hospitalized, but his health is reportedly improving after spending five weeks in a Pretoria hospital with a lung infection.

Former South African President Thabo Mbeki, who succeeded Mandela, the country's first black president, says that the former anti-apartheid and Nobel laureate could be discharged soon.

Mandela has been in critical condition since June 8 when he was hospitalized with the recurring infection, which he first contracted during his 27 years as a political prison.

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Law
4:49 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

Pennsylvania's Voter ID Law Gets Its Day In Court

The Penndot Drivers License Center in Butler, Pa., displays signs promoting the requirement for voters to show an acceptable photo ID at the polls. On Monday, a judge will rule on the constitutionality of the state's controversial voter ID law.
Keith Srakocic AP

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 11:13 pm

Pennsylvania's voter ID law will be back in state court Monday after more than a year of legal limbo. A state judge will decide whether the 2012 law — which hasn't been enforced — violates the state's constitution.

The measure requires voters to show a particular state-issued photo ID before casting ballots. Last week, civil rights advocates like the NAACP's John Jordan railed against the requirement.

"It's a ploy to take votes away from people who deserve them — veterans, seniors, students, people with disabilities, people of color and hard-working folk," Jordan said.

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News
4:49 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

The Civil Rights Stand Of A Young Gerald Ford

President Gerald Ford finishes giving a speech on Jan. 13, 1975. Ford was born 100 years ago Sunday.
Marion S. Trikosko Courtesy of Library of Congress

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 6:54 pm

President Gerald R. Ford, the only American to serve as both vice president and president without ever being elected to either office, was born 100 years ago Sunday.

Ford will be remembered for his role in the turbulent post-Watergate era. But a little-known story from his college days might also serve to define Ford's character.

The Gerald Ford We Know

In 1973, Ford was a congressman from Grand Rapids, Mich., who had risen through the ranks to become House minority leader. In those days before C-SPAN, Ford was barely known to most Americans.

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The Two-Way
3:23 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

'Harry Potter' Author Conjures Pseudonym For Debut Crime Novel

British author J.K. Rowling pictured at the 2013 Wimbledon Championships tennis tournament in June.
Glyn Kirk AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 1:11 pm

Amazon describes Robert Galbraith's best-selling novel, The Cuckoo's Calling, as "a brilliant debut mystery in a classic vein." But as brilliant and classically inclined as it might be, the real mystery until now has been all about the author.

It turns out that Robert Galbraith is the nom de plume of none other than J.K. Rowling, the famous creator of the phenomenally successful Harry Potter books.

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Author Interviews
3:22 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

Racing Hearts, Fluttering Wings: American 'Butterfly People'

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 6:54 pm

During the mid-19th century, an unexpected craze swept America: butterfly collecting. Eager to move on from the Civil War and driven by Europe's long-standing fascination with the insect, the movement captured the interest of Americans from all ages and walks of life.

In an extensive book, Butterfly People: An American Encounter with the Beauty of the World, William Leach documents this butterfly phenomenon — from its founders and followers, to its eventual fall.

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The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

Syrian Army Shelling Reportedly Traps Hundreds In Mosque

Rebel fighters take positions during clashes with pro-government forces in Aleppo earlier this month.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

At least 200 people are trapped inside a mosque in the Syrian capital, Damascus, as government forces rain artillery on rebel-held areas.

Rasha Elass, in Beirut, reports for NPR that the Syrian opposition has pleaded with the United Nations to intervene.

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All Tech Considered
1:28 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

Why A Symbol For 'The' Probably Won't Take Off

This new symbol for "the" probably won't become a new trend.
Youtube

An Australian restaurant owner-turned-innovator has created a character to replace the word "the" in the English language. Similar to how the ampersand replaces "and" and the "@" symbol replaces the word "at," Paul Mathis' character looks to simplify the most common word in the English language.

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The Two-Way
1:10 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

Typhoon Lashes China, Adding To Flood Woes

Huge typhoon-driven waves surge up the coastline of Huangqi Peninsula in China's eastern Fujian province on Saturday.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Hundreds of thousands of people in southeast China have been evacuated after a powerful typhoon barreled into the region, packing strong winds and heavy rain.

Typhoon Soulik made landfall in China's Fujian province Saturday afternoon after sweeping across Taiwan.

The typhoon comes as China is already battling torrential rainfall across large parts of the country, especially in Sichuan province. Some 200 people have been killed in floods, the worst in some areas of Sichuan in 50 years.

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The Two-Way
12:11 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

Civil Rights Groups Call Zimmerman Verdict A 'Miscarriage'

Supporters of Treyvon Martin wait in front of the Seminole County Criminal Justice Center before the not-guilty verdict was announced in the George Zimmerman murder trial on Saturday in Sanford, Fla. Now, the NAACP and other groups are calling for the Department of Justice to bring a civil rights case against George Zimmerman.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 3:48 pm

Civil rights groups reacted with disappointment to the not-guilty verdict in the George Zimmerman murder trial.

After the outcome became known late Saturday, the NAACP Legal Defense Fund said it would push for the Department of Justice to bring civil rights charges against Zimmerman, who was accused in the fatal shooting of 17-year-old black youth Trayvon Martin.

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